TableDisplay

TitleDescriptionOral History ID
Joe Ames Oral HistoryThe first part of this interview with Joe Ames is not transcribed and begins already in progress. Ames recalls the last years of President Zander and the highlights of those years are discussed. The controversy behind Leo Kramer’s book Labor’s Paradox is discussed as well as the making of the book and reaction to it after it was published. The union conventions of the 1960’s are discussed in detail along with the elections procedures and the aftermath of the elections. The last part of the interview covers the interest that Zander had in public housing and the union’s interest in those projects.WPR 0001
Roy Kubista Oral HistoryThis interview takes place in two parts. Part I discusses the Kubista’s early life and education. Kubista began to work for the Wisconsin State Employees Association in 1934 conducting research on a part-time basis. Kubista discusses his research and the state of the Association during that period and the early days of the AFSCME. Kubista recalls Arnold Zander and describes his experiences with the leader. In part II Kubista discusses the role of AFSCME employee Colonel Alva E. Garey. The impact of WWII is mentioned as is the Associations involvement during and after the war. Kubista held the position of Executive-Secretary from 1936-1970, that latter part of the interview deals with his experience in that position and his role in the Association.WPR 0002
William J. McEntee Oral HistoryWilliam J. McEntee began his career as a union activist in 1924 after getting a job with the city of Philadelphia as a street cleaner. The street cleaners first organized under the Teamsters. The affiliation did not last and the cleaners were briefly organized under the city. The new city run union soon ran into problems, and after striking the union joined the State, County and Municipal Employees under the AF of L and became Local 222. McEntee discusses his position at Local 222 as a Business Agent and later as President of District Council 3. He discusses the rate of growth of the Council in the 1940’s. McEntee recalls his relationship and experiences working with International President Arnold Zander and the highlights of his experiences with the Council and the Union. McEntee retired in 1968, he shares his union involvement and life after retirement.WPR 0003
Dr. Joseph Mire Oral HistoryDr. Joseph Mire was an economist and the first Education and Research Director of the AFSCME from 1943-1955. Dr. Mire was born and raised in Vienna, Austria and was active in the European labor movement. He emigrated to the U.S. in 1941 and taught economics at the School for Workers in Madison, WI. In 1943 Arnold Zander hired Dr. Mire as an economist/educator/researcher for the AFSCME. Dr. Mire compares the European labor movement to the American movement. He discusses the differences in labor education, research services, and political and social involvement in the labor movement. Dr. Mire left the AFSCME in 1955 to become the Director of the National Institute of Labor Education.WPR 0004
Rose Claffy Oral HistoryAFT-sponsored series of interviews with leading figures in the union. Topics discussed include the rise of the militant teacher, early collective bargaining and strikes, AFT political structure, Shanker vs. Selden fight and Oceanhill-Brownsville.WPR 0005
Charles Cogen Oral HistoryAFT-sponsored series of interviews with leading figures in the union. Topics discussed include the rise of the militant teacher, early collective bargaining and strikes, AFT political structure, Shanker vs. Selden fight and Oceanhill-Brownsville.WPR 0006
Patrick Daly Oral HistoryAFT-sponsored series of interviews with leading figures in the union. Topics discussed include the rise of the militant teacher, early collective bargaining and strikes, AFT political structure, Shanker vs. Selden fight and Oceanhill-Brownsville.WPR 0007
David Elsila Oral HistoryAFT-sponsored series of interviews with leading figures in the union. Topics discussed include the rise of the militant teacher, early collective bargaining and strikes, AFT political structure, Shanker vs. Selden fight and Oceanhill-Brownsville.WPR 0008
John Fewkes Oral HistoryAFT-sponsored series of interviews with leading figures in the union. Topics discussed include the rise of the militant teacher, early collective bargaining and strikes, AFT political structure, Shanker vs. Selden fight and Oceanhill-Brownsville.WPR 0009
Catherine McGourty Oral HistoryAFT-sponsored series of interviews with leading figures in the union. Topics discussed include the rise of the militant teacher, early collective bargaining and strikes, AFT political structure, Shanker vs. Selden fight and Oceanhill-Brownsville.WPR 0010
Carl Megel Oral HistoryAFT-sponsored series of interviews with leading figures in the union. Topics discussed include the rise of the militant teacher, early collective bargaining and strikes, AFT political structure, Shanker vs. Selden fight and Oceanhill-Brownsville.WPR 0011
Robert Porter Oral HistoryAFT-sponsored series of interviews with leading figures in the union. Topics discussed include the rise of the militant teacher, early collective bargaining and strikes, AFT political structure, Shanker vs. Selden fight and Oceanhill-Brownsville.WPR 0012
Mary Ellen Riordan Oral HistoryAFT-sponsored series of interviews with leading figures in the union. Topics discussed include the rise of the militant teacher, early collective bargaining and strikes, AFT political structure, Shanker vs. Selden fight and Oceanhill-Brownsville.WPR 0013
Herrick Roth Oral HistoryAFT-sponsored series of interviews with leading figures in the union. Topics discussed include the rise of the militant teacher, early collective bargaining and strikes, AFT political structure, Shanker vs. Selden fight and Oceanhill-Brownsville.WPR 0014
David Selden Oral HistoryAFT-sponsored series of interviews with leading figures in the union. Topics discussed include the rise of the militant teacher, early collective bargaining and strikes, AFT political structure, Shanker vs. Selden fight and Oceanhill-Brownsville.WPR 0015
William Simmons Oral HistoryAFT-sponsored series of interviews with leading figures in the union. Topics discussed include the rise of the militant teacher, early collective bargaining and strikes, AFT political structure, Shanker vs. Selden fight and Oceanhill-Brownsville.WPR 0016
Rebecca Simonson Oral HistoryAFT-sponsored series of interviews with leading figures in the union. Topics discussed include the rise of the militant teacher, early collective bargaining and strikes, AFT political structure, Shanker vs. Selden fight and Oceanhill-Brownsville.WPR 0017
Mary and Charles Smith Oral HistoryAFT-sponsored series of interviews with leading figures in the union. Topics discussed include the rise of the militant teacher, early collective bargaining and strikes, AFT political structure, Shanker vs. Selden fight and Oceanhill-Brownsville.WPR 0018
Marjorie Stern Oral HistoryAFT-sponsored series of interviews with leading figures in the union. Topics discussed include the rise of the militant teacher, early collective bargaining and strikes, AFT political structure, Shanker vs. Selden fight and Oceanhill-Brownsville.WPR 0019
Raoul Teihet Oral HistoryAFT-sponsored series of interviews with leading figures in the union. Topics discussed include the rise of the militant teacher, early collective bargaining and strikes, AFT political structure, Shanker vs. Selden fight and Oceanhill-Brownsville.WPR 0020
St. Paul Federation of Teachers Strike Oral HistoriesInterview with four participants in the first organized teachers’ strike in the United States, conducted in 1974 as part of the History of Minnesota Labor Project.WPR 0021
Albert Shanker Oral HistoryInterview with the AFT president, focusing on New York City politics during the 1970’s, conducted by Miriam Shore as part of the “New York Jews in Politics” project sponsored by the American Jewish Committee.WPR 0022
Joseph Jablonower Oral HistoryInterview conducted under the auspices of Columbia University, 1965. Transcript in Box 8 of the Jablonower Collection.WPR 0023
Auto-Lite Strike Oral HistoriesInterviews conducted by Philip A. Korth and others at Michigan State University as part of his research on the 1934 Auto-Lite strike in Toledo, Ohio, 1973. Some interviews contain releases.WPR 0024
Adrian Falk Oral HistoryInterview describes the wholesale grocery business.WPR 0025
Ernesto Galaraza Oral HistoryInterview covers the United Farm WorkersWPR 0026
Mary Gallagher Oral HistoryInterview covers the IWW and Tom MooneyWPR 0027
Elsie Martinez Oral HistoryInterview covers the San Francisco Bay Area Writers and ArtistsWPR 0028
Jennie Matjas Oral HistoryInterview covers the ILGWUWPR 0029
Frances Albrier Oral HistoryMrs. Francis Albrier was the first black women welder and member of the International Brotherhood of Boilermakers, Iron Ship Builders and Helpers of the AFL-CIO in Richmond, CA during WWII. In this interview Albrier recalls the problems she had finding employment at the ship yards because of her race. Albrier did obtain a position as a welder but was also not allowed to join the union due to its color bar. She shares the letters she wrote to President Roosevelt and the reaction of the union after the federal government intervened. Albrier’s correspondence is included in the oral history.WPR 0030
Robert “Buddy” Battle Oral HistoryRobert Battle was the President of the Trade Union Leadership Council and second vice-president of the UAW Ford Local 600. This interview describes his work with the Ford Motor Company and the employment of blacks, Ford Organizing Drive, and origins of the TULC (Trade Union Leadership Council) and of NALC (Negro American Labor Council). Battle also recalls the relationship of UAW and TULC and blacks and apprenticeship training.WPR 0031
Joseph Billups Oral HistoryJoseph Billups was one of the earliest black members of UAW Ford Local 600. In this interview Billups discusses pre-UAW auto unionism, black and left-wing activities, and Detroit during the Depression. Also included are discussions on the Ford Hunger March, the Ford Organizing Drive, and Nat Turner clubs.WPR 0032
Geraldine Bledsoe Oral HistoryGeraldine Bledsoe was the former director of Equal Employment Opportunity Michigan Employment Security Commission. In this interview Bledsoe describes the CIO and the black community, the Detroit chapter of the NAACP, Reverend Charles Hill and civil rights organization from 1935-1945.WPR 0033
Joseph Coles Oral HistoryJoseph Coles was a Black Democratic leader and former assistant director of the Detroit Commission on Community Relations. In this interview he describes the Sweet trials, the black political shift from Republican to Democratic Party, and the Detroit city government in relation to blacks. Also included are his recollections on housing, the Sojourner Truth Riot, the Detroit Race Riot of 1943, and Mayor Jeffries.WPR 0034
George Crockett Oral HistoryIn this interview George Crockett describes the Detroit Recorder’s Court, his youth and education, and activities as attorney for FEPC. Crockett also recalls his experiences as executive director of the UAW’s Fair Practice Committee and the involvement of blacks in Detroit politics.WPR 0035
Malcolm Dade Oral HistoryFather Dade was a priest at St. Cyprian’s Presbyterian Evangelical Church in Detroit. This interview discusses his involvement with the Ford Motor Co. and the black Church, the Ford organizing drive and the relationship of the UAW to black community.WPR 0036
Nick DiGaetano Oral HistoryNick DiGaetano is a UAW Local 7 retiree. This interview discusses DiGaetano’s recollections of the ethnic groups among Detroit workers, the IWW-Industrial Workers of the World, and blacks in the auto plants and in the UAW.WPR 0037
Edward L. Doty Oral HistoryEdward Doty was a plumber and black unionist in Chicago Illinois. In this interview Doty recalls the problem of discrimination in the Chicago area building trades, especially in electricians’ and plumbers’ unions. Doty also describes the organization of the all-black Consolidated Trades Council.WPR 0038
Snow Grigsby Oral HistorySnow Grigsby was a Black church and labor leader and a former post office employee. In this interview Grigsby recalls the race relations in Detroit following World War I and the organization and activities of the Detroit Civic League, particularly in opening jobs for blacks.WPR 0039
Ray Hatcher Oral HistoryRay Hatcher was the Deputy Director of the Detroit Regional office of Housing and Urban Development Department. In this interview he describes his role with the Detroit Urban League in the early 1940’s, discrimination in housing and Sojourner Truth and the Detroit Race Riots of 1942 and 1943. Hatcher also recalls Royal Oak Township’s efforts to become a self-sufficient all black community and the results of the efforts.WPR 0040
Rev. Charles Hill Oral HistoryThe Reverend Charles Hill was the late pastor of the Hartford Ave Baptist Church in Detroit. This interview recalls his involvement with the Ford Motor Co. and the black church, the Ford Organizing Drive and the role blacks in the unions. Reverend Hill discusses the expansion of housing opportunities for blacks, the Detroit Race Riot of 1943, and black political activities in Detroit.WPR 0041
Dorothy Jones Oral HistoryDorothy Jones, a faculty member at Rutgers State University, recalls her role as an educator and labor activist. This interview describes her involvement with the United Federation of Teachers, Dr. Kenneth Clark, and the Northern school desegregation. Jones also discusses the Brownsville episode, the Black Caucus of AFT, and activist Al Shanker.WPR 0042
William Lattimore Oral HistoryWilliam Lattimore recalls his involvement with the Federal Mediation and Conciliation Service and the organization of Local 3 under the UAW. Lattimore also describes his role with the “Dirty Nickel” Strike of Dodge foundry workers, the black caucus at the UAW, the Grand Rapids Convention of 1944, and UAW factionalism and the black community.WPR 0043
Jack Lever Oral HistoryJack Lever is a former labor educator and organizer. He recalls his involvement with cooperatives, union organizing in the IAM-International Association of Machinists and the relationship between the IAM and black workers. Lever also discusses the Brookwood Labor College, Ben Fletcher, the IWW, the longshoremen’s Association and the Steelworkers Organizing Committee. The transcript also includes an addendum.WPR 0044
David Livingston Oral HistoryIn this interview David Livingston recalls his activities as President of District 65, Distributive Workers of America. Livingston discusses his roles with the Distributive Workers, the Textile Workers Union and the organizing of black and Puerto Rican workers.WPR 0045
Eleanor Macki Oral HistoryIn this interview Eleanor Macki discusses her membership with the American Youth Congress Civil Rights Federation and the Civil Rights Congress. Macki recalls the Detroit riots, the Sojourner Truth housing episode, and her involvement with the American Federation of Teachers in the 1930’s and 1940’s.WPR 0046
Frank Marquart Oral HistoryFrank Marquart, a former labor educator with the UAW, recalls relocating to Detroit in 1914 with his father in search of employment with the Ford Motor Co. after hearing about the Ford $5.00 per day wage announcement. In this interview Marquart describes the conditions with black workers and Ford and recalls the role of radicalism in the pre-World War II period. Marquart discusses the Proletarian Party, blacks and communism, and UAW educational activities.WPR 0047
Hodges Mason Oral HistoryThis interview with Hodges Mason, one of the first black presidents of a UAW local, takes place in two parts. Part I deals with the participation of blacks in sit-down strikes, the 1938 strike at Bohn Aluminum, and blacks and left-wing activities. Mason also discusses UAW conventions, especially 1937, 1942, 1943, organizing at the Ford Rouge Plant, and factionalism in UAW in the 1930’s-40’s. Part II of the interview deals with Masons involvement with the placing of the first black women in war production in the Detroit area.WPR 0048
Arthur McPhaul Oral HistoryArthur McPhaul is the former Executive Secretary of the Civil Rights Congress of Michigan. In this interview McPhaul describes his experiences with the Ford Organizing Drive, the Civil Rights Federation, National Negro Congress, and Civil Rights Congress. McPhaul recalls the black community in the 1930’s including the role of the Black Legion, police brutality, and the Sojourner Truth Riot.WPR 0049
James Neeley Oral HistoryJames Neeley was an International representative for the UAW at time of death in 1969. In this interview Neeley recalls the upgrading of black workers in war production jobs in Detroit area in 1940s. Also included are a discussion of the hate strikes at Packard Motor Co., the 1943 Race Riot, and Neeleys views on separatism.WPR 0050
Arthur Osman Oral HistoryArthur Osman is the Former president of the District 65 Distributive Workers of America. In this interview Osman recalls the conditions in the dry goods industry in New York in the early 1930’s, the AFL-CIO split in later 30’s, and the organizing of black workers in the industry. Osman describes his involvement with the adoption of a hiring hall system and policy on sending black job applicants, democratic practices in the union, the changing racial make-up of union, and the relationship with clothing industry unions and with the Teamsters.WPR 0051
Jack Raskin Oral HistoryJack Raskin was the former executive secretary of the Civil Rights Congress of Michigan. In this interview Raskin recalls his involvement with the Civil Rights Congress and its predecessor organizations in 1940’s and early 1950’s. Raskin describes his interest and work in racial problems including the Sojourner Truth project, the infiltration at neighborhood improvement association meetings, the National Negro Congress and the Presidential campaign of 1944.WPR 0052
Zeline Richard Oral HistoryZeline Richard was a member and former Vice-President of the Detroit Board of Education and was prominent in leadership of the New Caucus of AFT-American Federation of Teachers. In this interview she recalls her involvement with the growth of Detroit Federation of Teachers, the national AFT conventions from 1964-1969, and the “Racism in Education” Conference of 1966. Mrs. Richards also discusses the role of Ed Simpkins in AFT, the Detroit Federation and its response to needs of black teachers, and her opinion of Al Shanker and the New York AFT situation.WPR 0053
George Robertson Oral HistoryOral history interview with George Robertson, President of the UAW Local 235 Detroit. In this interview Robertson describes his experiences as production worker at Chevrolet Gear and Axle in the late 1940’s and discusses the attitude of local union toward grievances of black workers, then and now.WPR 0054
Horace Sheffield Oral HistoryIn this interview Horace Sheffield, an administrative assistant with the UAW discusses his involvement with the organizing campaign at Ford, the involvement of NAACP on union’s side, and black and left wing political activities. Sheffield recalls various UAW conventions and the question of a black board member, especially in 1943, 1959, and 1962. He describes the organization of TULC- Trade Union Leadership Council, its subsequent development, and the NALC-National Association of Letter Carriers - and its relation to TULC.WPR 0055
C. LeBron Simmons Oral HistoryC. LeBron Simmons was a practicing Detroit attorney at the time of this interview. Simmons recalls the events of the Sojourner Truth housing project and police brutality in the 1930’s. Simmons describes his presidency with the Detroit Chapter of the National Negro Congress and how he became involved in the congress. Also included in the interview is a discussion of Simmons work as an assistant prosecutor.WPR 0056
Birney Smith Oral HistoryBernie Smith was a retired Juvenile Court probation officer. In this interview Smith recalls black life in Detroit in early the 1900’s, the organization of Detroit Urban League, and black politics at the turn of the century. Mr. Smith discusses the reactions to the black influx of World War I, his relationships with John Dancy, Forrester Washington, and St. Matthews Church and Father Daniel.WPR 0057
Shelton Tappes Oral HistoryShelton Tappes was the Assistant Director for the UAW Fair Practices Department. In this interview Tappes recalls the Automobile industry before unionization, “Negro” jobs in the auto industry, and the Ford Organizing Drive. Tappes describes the role of black in growth of Local 600, the black caucuses in the UAW, and the history of Fair Practices Department.WPR 0058
Beulah Whitby Oral HistoryBeulah Whitby was a social worker and former assistant director of the Detroit Commission on Community Relations. In this interview Whitby recalls her employment as the Assistant Executive Secretary with the then segregated YWCA and casework with the Detroit welfare department under the Office of Civilian Defense. She describes Detroit in Depression, the Sojourner Truth episode, the 1943 Race Riot, the NAACP, the Urban League, and the black community.WPR 0059
John W. Anderson Oral History1933 Briggs strike. Contains a release.WPR 0060
William V. Banks Oral History1933 Briggs strike. Contains a release.WPR 0061
Fred Valle Oral History1933 Briggs strike.WPR 0062
Arlene Altman Oral HistoryChild care and child development in metropolitan Detroit.WPR 0063
Ethel Childs Baker Oral HistoryChild care and child development in metropolitan Detroit.WPR 0064
Louise “Sally” Brown Oral HistoryChild care and child development in metropolitan Detroit.WPR 0065
Esther Callard Oral HistoryChild care and child development in metropolitan Detroit.WPR 0066
Leslie De Pietro Oral HistoryChild care and child development in metropolitan Detroit.WPR 0067
Florence Duhn Oral HistoryChild care and child development in metropolitan Detroit.WPR 0068
Alva Dworkin Oral HistoryChild care and child development in metropolitan Detroit.WPR 0069
Marion Edman Oral HistoryChild care and child development in metropolitan Detroit.WPR 0070
Sharon Elliott Oral HistoryChild care and child development in metropolitan Detroit.WPR 0071
Arthur Enzmann Oral HistoryChild care and child development in metropolitan Detroit.WPR 0072
Mary and Don Frew Oral HistoryChild care and child development in metropolitan Detroit.WPR 0073
David C. Hollister Oral HistoryChild care and child development in metropolitan Detroit.WPR 0074
Nicholas Hood Oral HistoryChild care and child development in metropolitan Detroit.WPR 0075
Teola Hunter Oral HistoryChild care and child development in metropolitan Detroit.WPR 0076
Kaye Koulouras Oral HistoryChild care and child development in metropolitan Detroit.WPR 0077
Anne Linn Oral HistoryChild care and child development in metropolitan Detroit.WPR 0078
Josephine Love Oral HistoryChild care and child development in metropolitan Detroit.WPR 0079
Ginny McCaig Oral HistoryChild care and child development in metropolitan Detroit.WPR 0080
Susie McCarroll Oral HistoryChild care and child development in metropolitan Detroit.WPR 0081
Elenora Moore Oral HistoryChild care and child development in metropolitan Detroit.WPR 0082
Keith Osborn Oral HistoryChild care and child development in metropolitan Detroit.WPR 0083
Bert Pryor Oral HistoryChild care and child development in metropolitan Detroit.WPR 0084
Carole Quarterman Oral HistoryChild care and child development in metropolitan Detroit.WPR 0085
Annmarie Roeper Oral HistoryChild care and child development in metropolitan Detroit.WPR 0086
Marjorie Sanger Oral HistoryChild care and child development in metropolitan Detroit.WPR 0087
Dave Weikert Oral HistoryChild care and child development in metropolitan Detroit.WPR 0088
Roger Baldwin Oral HistoryColumbia University / New York Times Oral HistoriesWPR 0089
John Brophy Oral HistoryColumbia University / New York Times Oral HistoriesWPR 0090
William Davis Oral HistoryColumbia University / New York Times Oral HistoriesWPR 0091
Julius Emspack Oral HistoryColumbia University / New York Times Oral HistoriesWPR 0092
Albert Hayes Oral HistoryColumbia University / New York Times Oral HistoriesWPR 0093
Benjamin F. McLaurin Oral HistoryColumbia University / New York Times Oral HistoriesWPR 0094
Harry Mitchell Oral HistoryColumbia University / New York Times Oral HistoriesWPR 0095
A. Muste Oral HistoryColumbia University / New York Times Oral HistoriesWPR 0096
John O’Hara Oral HistoryColumbia University / New York Times Oral HistoriesWPR 0097
William Pollack Oral HistoryColumbia University / New York Times Oral HistoriesWPR 0098
Max Schachtman Oral HistoryColumbia University / New York Times Oral HistoriesWPR 0099
Norman Thomas Oral HistoryColumbia University / New York Times Oral HistoriesWPR 0100
Eva Valesh Oral HistoryColumbia University / New York Times Oral HistoriesWPR 0101
Roy Wilkins Oral HistoryColumbia University / New York Times Oral HistoriesWPR 0102
Douglas Fraser Oral HistorycorrespondenceWPR 0103
Ron Mestdagh Oral HistorycorrespondenceWPR 0104
Harriet Alpern Oral HistoryInterviews with Detroit-area second-wave feminists conducted by Sarah Arvey.WPR 0105
Gerry Barrons Oral HistoryInterviews with Detroit-area second-wave feminists conducted by Sarah Arvey.WPR 0106
Patricia Burnett Oral HistoryInterviews with Detroit-area second-wave feminists conducted by Sarah Arvey.WPR 0107
Marcia Cron Oral HistoryInterviews with Detroit-area second-wave feminists conducted by Sarah Arvey.WPR 0108
Margot Duley Oral HistoryInterviews with Detroit-area second-wave feminists conducted by Sarah Arvey.WPR 0109
Marcia Federbush Oral HistoryInterviews with Detroit-area second-wave feminists conducted by Sarah Arvey.WPR 0110
Algea Harrison Oral HistoryInterviews with Detroit-area second-wave feminists conducted by Sarah Arvey.WPR 0111
Elizabeth Homer Oral HistoryInterviews with Detroit-area second-wave feminists conducted by Sarah Arvey.WPR 0112
Joan Israel Oral HistoryInterviews with Detroit-area second-wave feminists conducted by Sarah Arvey.WPR 0113
Millie Jeffrey Oral HistoryInterviews with Detroit-area second-wave feminists conducted by Sarah Arvey.WPR 0114
Jean King Oral HistoryInterviews with Detroit-area second-wave feminists conducted by Sarah Arvey.WPR 0115
Diane Leventer Oral HistoryInterviews with Detroit-area second-wave feminists conducted by Sarah Arvey.WPR 0116
Marj Levin Oral HistoryInterviews with Detroit-area second-wave feminists conducted by Sarah Arvey.WPR 0117
Allyn Ravitz Oral HistoryInterviews with Detroit-area second-wave feminists conducted by Sarah Arvey.WPR 0118
Jacqueline Steingold Oral HistoryInterviews with Detroit-area second-wave feminists conducted by Sarah Arvey.WPR 0119
Mary Walsh Oral HistoryInterviews with Detroit-area second-wave feminists conducted by Sarah Arvey.WPR 0120
Jackie Washington Oral HistoryInterviews with Detroit-area second-wave feminists conducted by Sarah Arvey.WPR 0121
Bernice Adams Oral Historyincludes correspondenceWPR 0122
Ralph Brubaker Oral HistoryChrysler Missile Plant, Sahlin Engineering, includes correspondence.WPR 0123
Willie Eaddy Oral HistoryFabricon Products, includes correspondence.WPR 0124
Diane Garner Oral HistoryFord’s Flat Rock Foundry, includes correspondence.WPR 0125
Ruby Kendrick Oral HistoryAl-Craft Engineering, includes correspondence.WPR 0126
Daniel McCarthy Oral HistoryFabricon Products, includes correspondence.WPR 0127
Marilyn McCormick Oral HistoryNorthland Plastic, includes correspondence.WPR 0128
Jim & Dolores McHale Oral HistoryW.H. Case, includes correspondence.WPR 0129
Gabriel Solano Oral HistoryGeneral Motors, includes correspondence.WPR 0130
UAW Local 900 members - Ford Oral HistoryUAW Local 900 members - Ford Oral HistoryWPR 0131
Barbara Benetti Oral HistoryInterviews contain releases.WPR 0132
Hy Fireman Oral HistoryInterviews contain releases.WPR 0133
Leo Mogill Oral HistoryInterviews contain releases.WPR 0134
Albert Oriucci Oral HistoryInterviews contain releases.WPR 0135
Charles Pollack Oral HistoryInterviews contain releases.WPR 0136
Rebecca Rathmer Oral HistoryInterviews contain releases.WPR 0137
Kenneth Rowe Oral HistoryInterviews contain releases.WPR 0138
Edith Segal Oral HistoryInterviews contain releases.WPR 0139
Louis Sirotkin Oral HistoryInterviews contain releases.WPR 0140
Ruth Whitworth Oral HistoryInterviews contain releases.WPR 0141
Ida Bjorkquist Oral HistoryFinnish Socialist History ProjectWPR 0142
Charles Jay Oral HistoryFinnish Socialist History ProjectWPR 0143
James Jukela Oral HistoryFinnish Socialist History ProjectWPR 0144
Elvera Kanerva Oral HistoryFinnish Socialist History ProjectWPR 0145
Ilmi Reynolds Oral HistoryFinnish Socialist History ProjectWPR 0146
Herb Edwards Oral HistoryHerb Edwards talks about his background and experiences as a lumberjack in the Pacific Northwest, his arrest for criminal syndicalism and subsequent prison term in San Quentin as well as memories of Elmer Smith.WPR 0147
Lucy Cloud Oral HistoryLucy Anne Cloud talks about her life as an IWW organizer and her memories of Elmer Smith.WPR 0148
Julia Ruuttila Oral HistoryJulia Ruuttila describes her involvement with the Centralia case and in getting Ray Becker out of jail, her radical background in the labor movement, and her memories of Elmer Smith.WPR 0149
Reginald Ayala Oral HistoryPart 1 [Box 1]WPR 0150
Herman Glass Oral HistoryPart 1 [Box 1]WPR 0151
Joseph Harris Oral HistoryPart 1 [Box 1]WPR 0152
Arthur Johnson Oral HistoryPart 1 [Box 1]WPR 0153
Dorothy Mottley Oral HistoryPart 1 [Box 1]WPR 0154
Marjorie Peebles-Meyers Oral HistoryPart 1 [Box 1]WPR 0155
Elsie Smith Oral HistoryPart 1 [Box 1]WPR 0156
Oretta Todd Oral HistoryPart 1 [Box 1]WPR 0157
Charles Wright Oral HistoryPart 1 [Box 1]WPR 0158
Watson Young Oral HistoryPart 1 [Box 1]WPR 0159
William Anderson Oral HistoryPart 2 [Box 2]WPR 0160
Wilma Brakefield-Caldwell Oral HistoryPart 2 [Box 2]WPR 0161
Henry Bryant Oral HistoryPart 2 [Box 2]WPR 0162
Alice Burton Oral HistoryPart 2 [Box 2]WPR 0163
Waldo Cain Oral HistoryPart 2 [Box 2]WPR 0164
James Collins Oral HistoryPart 2 [Box 2]WPR 0165
Claude & Vivienne Cooper Oral HistoryPart 2 [Box 2]WPR 0166
Gladys Dillard Oral HistoryPart 2 [Box 2]WPR 0167
George Gaines Oral HistoryPart 2 [Box 2]WPR 0168
Leon Gant Oral HistoryPart 2 [Box 2]WPR 0169
Della Goodwin Oral HistoryPart 2 [Box 2]WPR 0170
Frank Iacobell Oral HistoryPart 2 [Box 2]WPR 0171
Horace Jefferson Oral HistoryPart 2 [Box 2]WPR 0172
Sidney Jenkins Oral HistoryPart 2 [Box 2]WPR 0173
Arthur Boddie Oral HistoryPart 2 [Box 2]WPR 0174
Rachel Keith Oral HistoryPart 2 [Box 3]WPR 0175
William Lawson Oral HistoryPart 2 [Box 3]WPR 0176
Josephine Love Oral HistoryPart 2 [Box 3]WPR 0177
Hayward Maben Oral History Jr. Oral HistoryPart 2 [Box 3]WPR 0178
Berna Mason Oral HistoryPart 2 [Box 3]WPR 0179
Suesetta McCree Oral HistoryPart 2 [Box 3]WPR 0180
David Northcross Oral HistoryPart 2 [Box 3]WPR 0181
Ophelia Northcross Oral HistoryPart 2 [Box 3]WPR 0182
Frank Raiford Oral HistoryPart 2 [Box 3]WPR 0183
Rev. Garther Roberson Oral HistoryPart 2 [Box 3]WPR 0184
Rev. Dr. S.L. Roberson Oral HistoryPart 2 [Box 3]WPR 0185
Fannie Starks Oral HistoryPart 2 [Box 3]WPR 0186
Lionel Swan Oral HistoryPart 2 [Box 3]WPR 0187
Irma Webb Oral HistoryPart 2 [Box 3]WPR 0188
Charles Whitten Oral HistoryPart 2 [Box 3]WPR 0189
David Burgess Oral Historyincludes correspondenceWPR 0190
John F. Correll Oral Historyincludes correspondenceWPR 0191
Harold Davey Oral Historyincludes correspondenceWPR 0192
John T. Doherty Oral Historyincludes correspondenceWPR 0193
Harry Fleischman Oral Historyincludes correspondenceWPR 0194
Dale Good Oral Historyincludes correspondenceWPR 0195
James Hoover Oral Historyincludes correspondenceWPR 0196
Lane Kirkland Oral HistoryA series of interviews covering the United States government’s involvement in international labor affairs from the establishment of the State Department’s Labor Attaché program in 1943, includes correspondence.WPR 0197
George Lichtblau Oral HistoryA series of interviews covering the United States government’s involvement in international labor affairs from the establishment of the State Department’s Labor Attaché program in 1943, includes correspondence.WPR 0198
George Lodge Oral HistoryA series of interviews covering the United States government’s involvement in international labor affairs from the establishment of the State Department’s Labor Attaché program in 1943, includes correspondence.WPR 0199
Ray Marshall Oral HistoryA series of interviews covering the United States government’s involvement in international labor affairs from the establishment of the State Department’s Labor Attaché program in 1943, includes correspondence.WPR 0200
Parke Massey Oral HistoryA series of interviews covering the United States government’s involvement in international labor affairs from the establishment of the State Department’s Labor Attaché program in 1943, includes correspondence.WPR 0201
Jay Mazur Oral HistoryA series of interviews covering the United States government’s involvement in international labor affairs from the establishment of the State Department’s Labor Attaché program in 1943, includes correspondence.WPR 0202
Bruce Millen Oral HistoryA series of interviews covering the United States government’s involvement in international labor affairs from the establishment of the State Department’s Labor Attaché program in 1943, includes correspondence.WPR 0203
Dale Povenmire Oral HistoryA series of interviews covering the United States government’s involvement in international labor affairs from the establishment of the State Department’s Labor Attaché program in 1943, includes correspondence.WPR 0204
Herman Rebhan Oral HistoryA series of interviews covering the United States government’s involvement in international labor affairs from the establishment of the State Department’s Labor Attaché program in 1943, includes correspondence.WPR 0205
Roger Schrader Oral HistoryInterview is with both Roger Schrader and Herbert E. WeinerWPR 0206
Ben Stephansky Oral HistoryA series of interviews covering the United States government’s involvement in international labor affairs from the establishment of the State Department’s Labor Attaché program in 1943, includes correspondence.WPR 0207
Gus Tyler Oral HistoryA series of interviews covering the United States government’s involvement in international labor affairs from the establishment of the State Department’s Labor Attaché program in 1943, includes correspondence.WPR 0208
Low Income and Minority Women Oral HistoriesIndexes by race, ethnic group, geographic area and subject available.WPR 0209
Irving Bluestone Oral HistoryCovers Bluestone’s early years in college and Europe at the outbreak of WWII. The interview includes a discussion on the book Negotiating the Future, written by Bluestone and his son.WPR 0210
Douglas Fraser Oral HistoryTom Downs’s interviews with state labor and political figures.WPR 0211
Mildred Jeffrey Oral HistoryTom Downs’s interviews with state labor and political figures.WPR 0212
Tom Downs Oral HistoryInterviews with state labor and political figures.WPR 0213
C. Peter Dougherty Oral HistoryIncludes correspondence and a release.WPR 0215
Wilfird F. “Bill” Doyle Oral HistoryIncludes a release.WPR 0216
George Edwards Oral HistoryIncludes correspondence and a release.WPR 0217
Robert Griffin Oral HistoryTom Downs’s interviews with state labor and political figures.WPR 0218
Adelaide Hart Oral HistoryInterview with Adelaide Hart and Neil StaeblerWPR 0219
Miles Lord Oral HistoryIncludes correspondence and a release.WPR 0220
G. Williams Oral HistoryTom Downs’s interviews with state labor and political figures.WPR 0221
Zolton Ferency Oral HistoryIncludes correspondence and a release.WPR 0222
Edward Allen Oral History“Recollections”. Includes correspondence.WPR 0223
Charles “Tad” Irvine Oral HistoryIncludes correspondence.WPR 0224
Don Stevens Oral HistoryIncludes correspondence.WPR 0225
Jonathon Eddy Oral HistoryJonathon Eddy interviews together with I.L. Kanen. Includes correspondence.WPR 0226
William Farson Oral HistoryJonathon Eddy interviews together with I.L. Kanen. Includes correspondence.WPR 0227
R. F. Gilfillan Oral HistoryIncludes correspondence.WPR 0228
Polish-American Autoworkers Oral HistoriesIncludes releases.WPR 0230
Irwin Baur Oral HistoryUAW Local 306 [Budd Wheel Company]. Also contains correspondence and a releases.WPR 0231
Arthur McPhaul Oral HistoryUAW Local 600. [Ford Rouge plant]. Also contains correspondence and a releases.WPR 0232
Philip Raymond Oral HistoryAuto Workers Union. Also contains correspondence and a releases.WPR 0233
John Zupan Oral HistoryRank and File Movement. Also contains correspondence and a releases.WPR 0234
Marie Baker Oral HistoryVol. 2, Index available in Vol. 1WPR 0235
Betty Boggs Oral HistoryVol. 3, Index available in Vol. 1WPR 0236
Clella Bowman Oral HistoryVol. 4, Index available in Vol. 1WPR 0237
Freda Campbell Oral HistoryVol. 5, Index available in Vol. 1WPR 0238
Norma Cantrell Oral HistoryVol. 6, Index available in Vol. 1WPR 0239
Flora Chavez Oral HistoryVol. 7, Index available in Vol. 1WPR 0240
Beatrice Clifton Oral HistoryVol. 8, Index available in Vol. 1WPR 0241
Alma Dotson Oral HistoryVol. 9, Index available in Vol. 1WPR 0242
Videll Drake Oral HistoryVol. 10, Index available in Vol. 1WPR 0243
Mildred Eusebio Oral HistoryVol. 11, Index available in Vol. 1WPR 0244
Maria Fierro Oral HistoryVol. 12, Index available in Vol. 1WPR 0245
Mern Freige Oral HistoryVol. 13, Index available in Vol. 1WPR 0246
Fanny Hill Oral HistoryVol. 14, Index available in Vol. 1WPR 0247
Marguerite Hoffman Oral HistoryVol. 15, Index available in Vol. 1WPR 0248
Josephine Houston Oral HistoryVol. 16, Index available in Vol. 1WPR 0249
Vera Hunter Oral HistoryVol. 17, Index available in Vol. 1WPR 0250
J. K. Oral HistoryVol. 18, Index available in Vol. 1WPR 0251
Eva Lowe Oral HistoryVol. 19, Index available in Vol. 1WPR 0252
Mary Luna Oral HistoryVol. 20, Index available in Vol. 1WPR 0253
Kathleen MacNeil Oral HistoryVol. 21, Index available in Vol. 1WPR 0254
Lillian March Oral HistoryVol. 22, Index available in Vol. 1WPR 0255
Belen Mason Oral HistoryVol. 23, Index available in Vol. 1WPR 0256
Glad McLeod Oral HistoryVol. 24, Index available in Vol. 1WPR 0257
Margarita McSweyn Oral HistoryVol. 25, Index available in Vol. 1WPR 0258
Adele Milligan Oral HistoryVol. 26, Index available in Vol. 1WPR 0259
Rose Mulligan Oral HistoryVol. 27, Index available in Vol. 1WPR 0260
Bette Murphy Oral HistoryVol. 28 (2), Index available in Vol. 1WPR 0261
Charlcia Neuman Oral HistoryVol. 29, Index available in Vol. 1WPR 0262
Olive Nordquist Oral HistoryVol. 30, Index available in Vol. 1WPR 0263
Isabell Orwin Oral HistoryVol. 31, Index available in Vol. 1WPR 0264
Mildred Owen Oral HistoryVol. 32, Index available in Vol. 1WPR 0265
Harriet Perry Oral HistoryVol. 33, Index available in Vol. 1WPR 0266
Mary Polliard Oral HistoryVol. 34, Index available in Vol. 1WPR 0267
Lupe Purdy Oral HistoryVol. 35, Index available in Vol. 1WPR 0268
Genevieve Roesch Oral HistoryVol. 36, Index available in Vol. 1WPR 0269
Alicia Shelit Oral HistoryVol. 37, Index available in Vol. 1WPR 0270
Etta Simmons Oral HistoryVol. 38, Index available in Vol. 1WPR 0271
Rose Singleton Oral HistoryVol. 39, Index available in Vol. 1WPR 0272
Addie Stangeland Oral HistoryVol. 40, Index available in Vol. 1WPR 0273
Helen Studer Oral HistoryVol. 41, Index available in Vol. 1WPR 0274
Marye Stumph Oral HistoryVol. 42, Index available in Vol. 1WPR 0275
Margaret White Oral HistoryVol. 43, Index available in Vol. 1WPR 0276
Evelyn Widdicombe Oral HistoryVol. 44, Index available in Vol. 1WPR 0277
Emilie Cooke Oral HistoryVol. 45, Index available in Vol. 1. Emilie Cook and Susan Laughlin are Women’s Counselors and interviewed together.WPR 0278
Bill Cooper Oral HistoryInterview on the 1934 Boston Store Strike.WPR 0279
Ralph Eliaser Oral HistoryDirector, SEIU Joint Council #8.WPR 0280
Elinor Glenn Oral HistoryGeneral manager Local 434 and first female International Executive Board member.WPR 0281
Elsie Hannon Oral HistoryService Employees International Union oral History InterviewsWPR 0282
George Hardy Oral HistoryGeorge Hardy, President, SEIU, and Charles C. (Charlie) Levey, International Vice President are interviewed together.WPR 0283
Charles Levey Oral HistoryService Employees International Union oral History InterviewsWPR 0284
Richard Liebes Oral HistoryDirector, SEIU Joint Council #2.WPR 0285
Arline Neal Oral HistoryService Employees International Union Oral History InterviewsWPR 0286
Albert Perry Oral HistoryPresident Local 32J.WPR 0287
Marchel Smiley Oral HistoryPresident Local 722.WPR 0288
John Sorbie Oral HistoryInternational Vice President, Local 50.WPR 0289
Where We Come From - SEIU Local 82 Members Oral HistoriesService Employees International Union oral History InterviewsWPR 0290
Thomas Young Oral HistoryLocal 32B.WPR 0291
Eleanor Baum Oral HistoryDr. Eleanor Baum is Dean of Engineering at The Cooper Union in New York City and Executive Director of the Cooper Union Research Foundation. She is an electrical engineer who received her Ph.D. from Polytechnic Institute of New York in 1964 after undergraduate studies at City College of New York. She earned the distinction of "first woman dean" of an engineering school in the U.S. when she was named Dean of Pratt Institute's School of Engineering in 1984. Baum joined the engineering faculty at Pratt Institute in 1965 as Assistant Professor, and previously served as the Chair of the Electrical Engineering Department in 1971. Baum began her career in the aerospace industry working for Sperry Rand Corporation and General Instrument Corporation. Although she soon entered academia while working on her doctorate, Baum maintained her ties to industry through consulting. Baum has played leadership roles in numerous professional associations and national engineering education initiatives. She is the first female president of the American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE), has served as president of the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology (ABET), has sat on the National Science Foundation's Engineering Advisory Board, and has been involved with the Engineering Manpower Commission. Baum has also garnered many accolades for her work. She is a fellow of ABET, the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, the Society of Women Engineers, and ASEE. In 1988 she won the Emily Warren Roebling Award, presented by the National Women's Hall of Fame; in 1990 she was awarded the SWE Upward Mobility Award; and in 1996 she was inducted into the Women in Technology International Hall of Fame. Nationally recognized for her efforts in advancing engineering education and promoting engineering as a career for women and minorities, Baum has conducted national surveys of women in engineering and undergraduate women engineering students. She frequently writes, speaks, and is interviewed about engineering education issues.WPR 0292
Lois Bey Oral HistoryLois Bey is a chemical engineer who holds the distinction of being the first woman graduate in chemical engineering from the Illinois Institute of Technology in Chicago, where she graduated with honors in 1950. In 2001, Bey received an IIT Distinguished Alumni Award for this accomplishment as well as for her commitment and contributions to the chemical engineering profession. Bey's early career involved a lot of hands-on involvement in lab work as well as experience with large industrial chemical equipment. She worked for a succession of companies including Edwal Laboratories, Underwriters Laboratories and the Armour Research Institute (now IIT Research Institute) with responsibilities ranging from lab technician to assistant engineer. From 1956-1960, Bey was employed as a sales engineer for a Midwest chemical process equipment manufacturer, F.M. De Beers, Assoc. where she sold and trouble-shooted equipment. After taking a job with Baxter Laboratories in 1960, Bey earned a master's degree in Library and Information Science. Until her retirement in 1993, Bey successfully combined both her degrees toward a career as an information specialist in chemical company research & development departments, first at Baxter and later at Stepan Chemical Company. Bey joined SWE in 1953 and is a life member. She was also an active member of the American Institute of Chemical Engineers and the American Society of Information Science.WPR 0293
Patricia Brown Oral HistoryPatricia Brown is a chemical engineer whose career took a different path than most. Graduating as the first woman chemical engineer from Southwestern Louisiana Institute, Brown went on to earn her master's in chemistry from the University of Texas. After graduation, Brown briefly taught chemistry at Smith College and then became a research associate at Albany Medical College, after which she worked for Ethyl Corporation in Detroit. While at Ethyl her career as a technical information resources specialist began. In 1955 she took a job as a technical writer at Westinghouse's Bettis Atomic Power Division. After Westinghouse, Brown joined Texas Instruments as Information Services Supervisor in 1957, where she had overall responsibility for administration of the library. She left Texas Instruments for a research career in information storage and retrieval at Battelle Memorial Institute, and later accepted a position in technical information management at Baxter Laboratories in Illinois. Brown remained in the field of information and research for the rest of her career until her retirement from Stepan Company, becoming skilled in data analysis, system design, reporting and publishing, computer operations and management. An early member of SWE, Brown has been very active in the society, serving as its president from 1961-1963. She has also been affiliated with the American Society for Information Science, the American Chemical Society, and the Society for Technical Communication.WPR 0294
Yvonne Clark & Irene Sharpe Oral HistoryYvonne Young Clark first became interested in engineering when she was a member of the Civil Air Patrol in high school during the Second World War. She originally considered studying aeronautics engineering but decided instead to pursue mechanical engineering at Howard University. In 1951 she became the first woman at Howard to complete her B.S.M.E. She became a licensed professional engineer and was the first woman to receive a master's degree in engineering management from Vanderbilt University. Clark began her career working at Frankford Arsenal-Gage Laboratories in Philadelphia and RCA in New Jersey. She moved to Nashville with her husband in 1955 but found few opportunities available to her in industry. She accepted a position as a mechanical engineering instructor and became the first female faculty member in the College of Engineering and Technology at Tennessee State University. Clark has taught at TSU for over 50 years, where she served twice as department chair and eventually became an associate professor. During summer breaks at TSU Clark has worked in the field for numerous organizations including the Marshall Space Flight Center, NASA, Westinghouse, and Ford Motor Company. Clark joined the Society of Women Engineers in 1952 and has served on its Executive Committee. She was elected to the College of Fellows in 1984 and received the Distinguished Engineering Educator Award from SWE in 1998. Clark is also an active member of the American Society of Engineering Education and the Society of Mechanical Engineers. Irene Sharpe recognizes the irony in her career choice, given that her childhood home did not have electricity until she was in middle school. While her family wanted her to become a math teacher Sharpe chose instead to study electrical engineering at Howard University, earning her degree in 1963. Sharpe spent the first 14 years of her career designing power distribution and control systems for the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation, the Bureau of Land Management, and the National Park Service. In 1977 Sharpe changed the focus of her career, working on automotive electrical systems at Ford Motor Company and later at General Motors Corporation in metropolitan Detroit. In 1988 she joined United Technologies, where she remained until her retirement as a principle engineer in 1999. Sharpe has been a member of the Society of Women Engineers since 1962 and was elected to the College of Fellows in 1990. She has been an officer for several sections, served on the national Executive Committee, and chaired the 1982 national convention. Sharpe is also an active member of the Society of Automotive Engineers.WPR 0295
Stella Daniels Oral HistoryStella Lawrence Daniels' career spans both industry and academia. With a master's in mathematics and physics from New York University, Daniels went on to pursue engineering. Before graduating with a master's in electrical engineering from the Polytechnic Institute of Brooklyn in 1952, Daniels began her engineering career as a development engineer and mathematician during WWII. It was during her post-war tenure at Bell Telephone Laboratories that Daniels began teaching electrical circuits in the evenings at Pratt Institute and physics in the evenings at The City College of New York. Daniels made the full-time switch to academia a couple of years later, becoming an assistant professor in electrical engineering technology at Bronx Community College where she retired as full professor in 1988.Even though the bulk of her career was in teaching engineering, Daniels maintained her ties to industry with consulting jobs, such as one at NASA during her summers between 1975 - 1992. A charter member of SWE, Daniels holds distinctions in several other professional engineering societies. She is a fellow and first woman member of the Brooklyn Engineers Club; a senior member, 20-year executive committee member, and 1978 Professional Achievement award winner of IEEE; and was the first woman president of the Technical Societies Council Of New York 1970-72.WPR 0296
Margaret Eller Oral HistoryMargaret Eller spent her career in the field of engineering graphics and drafting. Having first attended the University of Michigan School of Architecture, Eller went on to receive a B.S. from Wayne State University and a M.S. in engineering graphics from the Illinois Institute of Technology. She worked as a draftsman, engineering illustrator, and technical writer from during WWII until the mid 1950s. Working for such companies as General Motors, Eller conducted and supervised the design layout of tools, fixtures, aircraft parts, and auto bodies. In the 1950s, Eller began her teaching career at a local high school where she taught architectural and mechanical drafting before moving on to an assistant professorship at Ferris State University in engineering graphics. Eller retired from academia at Louisiana State University in 1980, where she also taught engineering graphics as the first female faculty in the College of Engineering. After retirement, she again worked in industry as an associate design draftsman in charge of patent drawings for SoGraph Design in Baton Rouge, LA. Eller was a 1952 charter member of the Detroit SWE section and was active both nationally and locally within SWE for 30 years. She was recognized in 1987 by the Society of Engineering Illustrators for outstanding contributions to the engineering illustration profession.WPR 0297
Ann Fletcher Oral HistoryAnn Fletcher chose engineering as a second career option, after teaching music for nearly ten years. Her career switch is a good example of the new opportunities that opened up to women as a result of WWII. She attended Wayne State University's College of Engineering from 1942-44, joining Bendix Aviation Corporation Research Labs in 1943 as a patent draftsman. In 1947 Fletcher began work as an industrial illustrator and patent draftsman at Ford Motor Company where she worked for 21 years. As the only industrial illustrator at Ford, she worked closely with inventors to produce illustrations for product, design, chemical, and metallurgical inventions, among others. Her last position before retiring in 1978 was as Technical Assistant to Chief Engineer at the Shatterproof Glass Corporation. Her assignment entailed duties from various technical analyses to reports and surveys for the Environmental Protection Agency. An early member of SWE, Fletcher experienced several "firsts" in her profession. It was during her position at Shatterproof that she became one of two women in the Society of Engineering Illustrators, serving two terms as president. She also became the first woman elected as fellow of the Engineering Society of Detroit and later to its board of directors. Fletcher received statewide recognition when in 1975 she was appointed to the Michigan State Registration Board of Professional Community Planners, the first woman to assume that responsibility.WPR 0298
Evelyn Fowler Oral HistoryEvelyn Fowler was part of the small group of women who were the earliest members of SWE. She was a charter member of the New York Section in 1949, a founding member of SWE national in 1950, and a founding member of the Connecticut Section in 1954. Fowler graduated from the Art School of Pratt Institute in 1942 and later returned to study chemical engineering she married an engineer. Upon gaining her bachelor's degree she went to work for her husband's company, the American Actuator Corporation of New York as a drafter and later secretary-treasurer.WPR 0299
Isabelle French & Elaine Pitts Oral HistoryThe daughter of a contractor, Isabelle French became interested in engineering at a young age. She graduated in 1944 from Tri-State College with a degree in radio engineering, the first woman at Tri-State to do so. She received an honorary doctorate from her alma mater in 1966. French began her career in 1944 working on the engineering and development of radar tubes at Sylvania in Massachusetts. She remained there until 1952 and held held a similar position at Capehart-Farnsworth in Indiana for another two years. In 1954 she joined Bell Telephone Laboratories in Allentown, Pennsylvania, where she remained until her retirement more than 40 years later. French has been an active member of the Society of Women Engineers since 1951 and has attended nearly every national conference. In addition to serving as SWE President from 1964-1966, she has also served as the chairman or president of several sections, national secretary and treasurer, and has sat on the national executive committee. French was elected to the SWE College of Fellows in 1981. After studying industrial engineering at the Illinois Institute of Technology and studying design at the Art Institute in Chicago, in 1943 Elaine Pitts applied to be a “secretary willing to be trained as a packaging engineer” at Aldens, Inc. in Chicago. In 1945 Pitts joined Spiegel, Inc. in Chicago as a senior packaging engineer, where she remained until 1952. The following year she began a long career at the Sperry and Hutchinson Company, where she organized and installed its packaging department. In 1970 she was appointed the Vice President of Corporate Relations. Nine years later she and a friend moved to California to open their own packaging company, Dalton/ Pitts Associates. A member of the Society of Women Engineers since 1964, Pitts has served on its Executive Board and was elected to the College of Fellows in 1981. She is a past president of the American Women in Radio and Television and of Women Executives in Public Relations. A Fellow of the Society of Packaging and Handling Engineers, she was the first woman to serve as that organization's Chairman of the Board.WPR 0300
Cornelius PittsOral history interview.WPR 0767
Lois Graham Oral HistoryLois Graham was an engineering educator for 36 years during a time when women were not even allowed as engineering students in many schools. She was the first woman to graduate in engineering from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI) in 1945; the first to receive a M.S.M.E. from the Illinois Institute of Technology (IIT); and the first to receive a Ph.D. in mechanical engineering in the country. Upon graduating from RPI Graham went to work for the Carrier Corporation as a test engineer. After 18 months she returned to academia for a graduate assistantship at IIT, where she would spend her entire teaching career. When she became an instructor in 1949 she was the first woman faculty member in the mechanical engineering department. When Graham became full professor in 1975 she was one of but a few woman in the country with that rank. In addition to instruction in such subjects as aeronautics, thermodynamics, and heat transfer, Graham served as Assistant Dept. Chair and briefly as Acting Dept. Chair. She was also appointed Assistant Director for Engineering and Science in 1974 and Program Center Director in 1977 of the Education and Experience in Engineering (E3) Program, a multidisciplinary, project-based curriculum program. Graham was also actively involved in recruiting minority students. She served as Chairman of the Women's Engineering Program; as Program Coordinator of the Early Identification Spring Program; Director of the Minorities in Engineering Program, an innovative program that received national recognition; and as Director of Motivation and Support for the Greater Chicago Area Program for increasing Minorities in Engineering by working with high school students. Graham's many professional affiliations include SWE, of which she is a fellow and past president (1955-56), the American Society of Mechanical Engineers, the American Society of Heating, Refrigeration and Air Conditioning Engineers, and the American Society for Engineering Education. She has earned several honors and has published extensively in engineering, scientific, educational, and management subjects.WPR 0302
Arminta Harness Oral HistoryLt. Col. Arminta Harness blazed a trail for women engineers in the Armed Forces during her 24 year career in the U.S. Air Force. Graduating with an aeronautical engineering degree from the University of Southern California in 1955, she became the Air Force's first woman engineer, rising to the rank of Lieutenant Colonel. Her assignments varied in responsibility from designing intelligence-gathering equipment for the U-2 aircraft to providing management direction for the $2 billion Space and Missile Systems Organization budget. As a lieutenant assigned to the Aerial Reconnaissance Laboratory at Wright Paterson Air Force Base, she was the first woman on orders as a test engineer during flight testing of experimental equipment, which she designed. In 1963 Harness was assigned to work on the Gemini manned space program at Air Force Space Systems. As a Major, she served as Deputy Chief of Engineering, and later, as Lieutenant Colonel, as Chief of Program Control for the $80 million Gemini Target Vehicle Program the unmanned spacecraft used as a docking target by the Gemini astronauts in space. It was during this assignment that she became the first woman to receive the specialty rating of Staff Development Engineer and the first woman to receive both Senior and Master Missileman Badges. Harness' military awards include the National Defense Service Medal, Air Force Commendation Medal, Joint Services Commendation Medal, and Air force Meritorious Service Medal. During her service, she was also recognized as a Fellow of the Institute for the Advancement of Engineering and received their 1971 Engineering Achievement Merit Award. Harness joined Westinghouse Hanford Company in 1974 following retirement from military service. In her five years with the company, she was Technical Assistant to the company president and Manager of Laboratory Planning for their nuclear development lab. A Fellow Life Member of SWE, Harness served as its president from 1976 - 1978 and in many other leadership roles on the local and national level. Following her second retirement in 1979, Harness remained active in SWE. She is the designer of the SWE's Resnik Challenger Medal, given upon merit, to an engineer whose contributions have broadened the frontiers of space exploration.WPR 0303
Ivy F. Hooks Oral HistoryIvy Hooks began her twenty-year-plus career as an aerospace engineer at the NASA Manned Spacecraft Center in Houston, TX. A 1965 master's graduate of the University of Houston in math and physics, she was involved in the early stages of aerodynamics of space shuttle flight. An original space shuttle design team member, Hooks went on to hold a number of management positions, including Separation System Integration Manager and Manager of Flight Software Verification. While at NASA she was the recipient of the Arthur S. Flemming Award for Outstanding Young Civil Servant, NASA Outstanding Speaker Award, and the NASA Medal. Leaving NASA in 1984, Hooks started her own software systems consulting firm, Compliance Automation, Inc. and now serves as its president and CEO. An internationally recognized expert in Requirement Engineering she has published many articles on the subject and co-authored "Customer-Centered Products: Creating Successful Products Through Smart Requirement Management." Hooks is a SWE Fellow, a charter member of the International Council on Systems Engineering, and holds membership in the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics, IEEE, and the Project Management Institute.WPR 0304
Suzanne Jenniches Oral HistorySuzanne Jenniches has been a leader in manufacturing innovation and producibility engineering for Northrop Grumman Corp. for more than 30 years, establishing many "firsts" for women within the company. Her responsibilities have included computer test engineering, electronic assembly, advanced robotic manufacturing, radar systems, and defense programs. She received a patent in 1980 for laser soldering and in 1981 she led operations for the B-1B bomber offensive radar, overseeing production of the first electronically scanned antenna for production aircraft in the world. Jenniches has served in many managerial roles at the company, including the vice presidencies of Automation and Information Systems, Communications Systems for the Electronic Systems sector, and the Government Systems Division. Engineering was Jenniches's second career choice, having begun her professional life as a high school biology teacher after graduating from Clarion State College in 1970. She made the transition to engineering industry as she pursued a master's degree in environmental engineering from Johns Hopkins University, which she received in 1979. Shortly after, Jenniches conducted extensive postgraduate work in Defense Decision Making and International Affairs at Catholic University and has attended the Harvard Business School Program for Management Development for Executive Management. An active Fellow and life member of SWE, Jenniches has served on many national committees as well as the society's 1988-89 president. She was awarded both the Distinguished New Engineer Award in 1983 and the Achievement Award in 2000. She has been equally active outside of SWE promoting engineering as a career, specifically for women. She has served on the American Association of Engineering Societies Board of Governors and as an expert witness before Congress on numerous occasions, in support of engineering and technology issues for NASA, NIST, AAES, and SWE.WPR 0305
Barbara “Bobbi” Johnson Oral HistoryBarbara "Bobbie" Johnson was a women pioneer in the defining years of the U.S. missile and space program. Graduating in 1946 as the first woman graduate in general engineering from the University of Illinois, Johnson immediately began work in the field of aerospace engineering. In her 36 year career at Rockwell International Space Division, she made significant contributions to four of the nation's most prominent systems and technology ventures. Early assignments involved design and research projects that included flight dynamics studies for programs such as Dyna-Soar, the recovery of hypersonic gliders, lunar reentry vehicle research, and orbital rendezvous. In five short years Johnson moved up from Mathematician to Senior Engineer, Aerodynamics, where she participated in the design and development of the Navaho missile, one of the country's first missile efforts. Johnson then worked on another major missile project, the Hound Dog air-to-ground guided missile as project leader responsible for wind tunnel programs, performance and stability analysis, and aerodynamic loads. It was the Apollo Lunar Landing Program that began Barbara Johnson's participation in manned space flight programs and defined her expertise in atmospheric entry, which garnered her widespread recognition. When she was named as manager of Mission Requirements and Evaluation on the Apollo Program in 1968 it was the highest post ever held by a woman in her division. Responsible for more than 100 engineers, Johnson worked closely with NASA on the Lunar Landing, Skylab, and Apollo-Soyuz (joint USA-USSR) programs. She received a medallion in 1973 from NASA in recognition of the major role she played in the Apollo 11 mission, mankind's first successful attempt to land on the moon. In her last position before retirement in 1982, Johnson was Manager of Mission Requirements and Integration of the space shuttle program where she was responsible for Shuttle system and Orbiter Project mission-related analysis. It was during this time that she received the American Astronautical Society's "Dick Brower Award," the Institute for the Advancement of Engineering's Outstanding Engineer Merit Award for contributions to aeronautical engineering, the University of Illinois College of Engineering's Distinguished Alumni Merit Award, and the 1974 SWE Achievement Award. A Fellow of the Institute for the Advancement of Engineering, an Associate Fellow of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics, and SWE Fellow, Barbara Johnson served both locally and nationally to promote engineering as a career, especially for women.WPR 0306
Margaret Kipilo Oral HistoryMargaret Kipilo is an electrical engineer who graduated from Pennsylvania State College during WWII. She went to work for Westinghouse Electric Corporation as an Assistant Engineer in System Studies followed by employment at the Pennsylvania Electric Company. An early member of SWE, Kipilo also was long active in the American Institute of Electrical Engineers.WPR 0307
Anna Longobardo Oral HistoryIn 1949 Anna Longobardo was the first woman to receive a B.S. in mechanical engineering from Columbia University. She also received her master's degree from Columbia in 1952. She quickly entered the new area of analog and digital computer applications and has since made major contributions to the aerospace engineering field. Her many specializations include the utilization of engineering resources. After 15 years as a systems engineer at American Bosch Arma Corporation, where she worked on guidance systems for space vehicles, Longobardo joined Sperry Rand Corp. In her 25-plus years at Sperry, which became Unisys Corporation in 1986, Longobardo held a number of positions in areas of technology management, at one time directing a staff of 750. Longobardo holds many distinctions as a woman engineer. In 1963 Governor Rockefeller appointed her to the New York State Women's Council; from 1966-1970 she was Director of the Technical Societies Council of New York; and she was named one of New York's "100 Women of Influence" by New York Woman magazine in 1986. She has been an active member of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers, the Joint Engineering Management Committee, the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics, as well as SWE, of which she was one of the original charter student members.WPR 0308
Alva Matthews Oral HistoryDuring her engineering career, Dr. Alva Matthews conducted original research, development studies, and consultation services in a variety of fields. She is best known for her significant contributions to the field of engineering mechanics and applied mathematics in the areas of shock analysis, elasticity and structural design, for which she won the SWE Achievement Award in 1971. In addition to her accomplishments in industry, Dr. Matthews also taught for many years at the university level. Matthews received her education at Middlebury and Barnard Colleges, earning a B.S. and M.S. in Science, and at Columbia University, earning a PhD. in Engineering Science. While an undergraduate in the 1950s, she worked as an engineer at a conduit construction firm and later as a design and research engineer for a prestigious firm during her graduate years. As a graduate student Matthews taught civil engineering at Columbia University, becoming their first woman engineering instructor. She continued to lecture at Columbia, the University of Rochester, and Swarthmore College after she received her doctorate, and became an Associate Professor in the Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Sciences at the University of Rochester. As a research engineer and consultant for Rochester Applied Science Associates and Paul Weidlinger Consulting Engineer, Matthews carried out fundamental research on the mechanical behavior of materials and wave propagation in solids, extending to nuclear weapons effects on structures. Other areas of effort include the development and adaptation of large computer codes, structural design of thin shell concrete, application of Potential Theory to underwater acoustics, and computer programming in the development of the Telstar tracking antenna and of helicopter blade design. Her publications have won recognition as pioneering efforts in the area of wave propagation and vibrations in elastic media. Matthews has held a number of offices in SWE, was a member of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers and the NY State Society of Professional Engineers, and served on the board of directors of the Engineers Joint Council from 1964-65.WPR 0309
Naomi McAfee Oral HistoryNaomi McAfee was a pioneer in the field of reliability and quality engineering. She received her B.S. degree in physics from Western Kentucky University in 1956. After graduation she joined Westinghouse Defense and Electronic Systems Center in Baltimore, MD. as a mathematician in the Reliability Engineering Section. McAfee went on to work on a variety of airborne missile control and radar systems as well as communication satellites. In subsequent supervisory engineering roles, she was responsible for the reliability, maintainability and safety engineering activities for all Defense and Space Center Programs. She was the first woman to hold such a supervisory engineer position at the company and headed the group responsible for developing the television camera system used on Skylab and other U.S. space programs. McAfee was also a leader in many professional organizations. She held several offices in SWE including the national presidency during 1972-74. She became the first woman elected officer of the American Society for Quality Control, was the 1978-79 president of the Federation of Organizations for Professional Women, served on the 1975-79 board of the Engineers Joint Council, and was involved in the Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers. She has been on the advisory council of engineering schools at Princeton University, Clarkson College of Technology, and Pennsylvania State University.WPR 0310
Dorothy Morris Oral HistoryDorothy Morris began her career in the engineering field as an administrative assistant in 1950 after graduating with a degree in business and accounting from Concordia Junior College. Concurrent with her early work life, Morris returned to college to study engineering and in just eight years she became Vice President and General Manager of Colvin Laboratories, Inc., an aerospace industry electronics manufacturer. At that time, she represented only a handful of women engineering management executives in the country, and she remains today an excellent example of the upward mobility of women in engineering. In addition to her tenure at Colvin Labs, Morris was General Manager, Treasurer, and Vice President of Victory Engineering Corporation and went on to establish her own consulting firm, Morris Associates, acting as its president. In the 1970s she was a member and SWE representative to the Engineering Manpower Commission, where she worked to advance engineering as a profession for women, becoming the commission's first women president. A longtime member of SWE, Morris has served in many local and national offices and is today a member of the Board of Trustees.WPR 0311
Maryly Peck Oral HistoryMaryly Van Leer Peck is President Emeritus of Polk Community College, where in 1982 she served as its first woman president, and consequently the first woman president of a Florida institution of higher learning. Throughout her over 45-year career, Dr. Peck established many other firsts for women in engineering. In 1951 Dr. Peck was the first woman to graduate with a degree in chemical engineering from Vanderbilt University. She went on to also become the first woman to receive a M.S. and Ph.D. in chemical engineering from the University of Florida. Peck began her career in the aerospace industry as a research engineer, working for the Washington, D.C. Naval Research Laboratory and Rocketdyne Corporation in California. She was also very early on involved in academia, teaching courses in engineering, chemistry, and math at various southern U.S. colleges. Peck accomplished all of this while working on her Ph.D., raising four children, and at the same time serving as SWE's national vice president. Before her tenure in Florida's higher education system, Dr. Peck lived on the island of Guam for 11 years. There, she became the first woman dean of the College of Business and Applied Technology at the University of Guam and founder and dean of what is now the Community College of Guam. A long-time SWE member, Peck has been featured in Life Magazine, named Distinguished Alumnus of the University of Florida in 1991, and received recognition and awards for her work in the advancement and awareness of engineering as a profession for women. She currently serves on the Chemical Engineering Advisory Council at the University of Florida.WPR 0312
Irene Peden Oral HistoryDr. Irene Peden is Professor Emerita of Electrical Engineering at the University of Washington. She joined the faculty in 1962 and served terms as Associate Dean of the College of Engineering and Associate Chairman of the EE Dept., in addition to her teaching and research. She has long been an outspoken advocate for women in engineering and science. Her efforts lead to the #1 U.S. ranking of UW in the 1990s for number of women faculty in an electrical engineering department. A graduate of electrical engineering from the University of Colorado in 1947, Peden earned both a M.S. and Ph.D. from Stanford University. Following her graduate studies Peden began as Assistant Professor at UW, taking time off from the university in the early 1990s to serve two years as Director of the Division of Electrical and Communications Systems at the National Science Foundation. Her research interests cover several fields: applied electromagnetics, radio science, antennas and subsurface remote sensing, and she has published widely on these subjects. In 1970, in pursuit of her research, Peden became the first American woman engineer or scientist to conduct field research in the Antarctic interior. In addition to being a SWE Fellow, Peden is a Fellow in the IEEE, holding a number of positions in that organization. She has served as board member and chair of several science and engineering associations, including the American Association for the Advancement of Science and the Engineering Accreditation Commission, as well as several university engineering departments. Among her many honors, she was the National Science Foundation's 1993 Engineer of the Year and one of 40 inductees to the ASEE Engineering Educators Hall of Fame, as well as the recipient of several IEEE awards and SWE's Achievement Award (1973).WPR 0313
Carolyn Phillips Oral HistoryCarolyn Phillips was a recognized leader in health & safety issues in the early days of environmental engineering and industrial hygiene. In 1960 she graduated from Pratt Institute with a mechanical engineering degree, where she was one of three women studying engineering. Phillips' first position was with the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission, working for two years as a reactor engineer on SNAP (Safety Systems for Nuclear Auxiliary Power). In 1962 she became the only woman engineer in the Division of Industrial Hygiene of the New York State Department of Labor. Her job included fieldwork, during which she collected samples of industrial wastes by climbing tall smokestacks and down into rock quarries. During this time Phillips also earned her Master's in civil engineering from New York University, with a concentration on sanitation. In the 1970s, Phillips was a student at NYU's Institute for Environmental Medicine and School of Engineering, working toward a Ph.D. While there, she served as Assistant Research Scientist at the Institute, conducting inhalation studies, and worked as a consultant with Environmental Analysts, Inc, participating in various health and environmental projects. From there, Phillips moved on to a long career at Shell Oil Company as an Industrial Hygienist, retiring in a management position. While at Shell, she worked on a special year-long assignment in the Netherlands where she was responsible for evaluation and development of an international occupational hygiene program. After retirement she worked as a health & safety consultant providing litigation support for both Shell and the Chemical Manufacturing Association. Throughout her career, Phillips maintained active membership and leadership in a number of professional organizations including SWE, ASME, and the American Industrial Hygiene Association. She has taught courses in industrial hygiene as an adjunct assistant professor at the University of Texas School of Public Health. Phillips has also received several appointments and honors from such organizations as the National Science Foundation, the U.S. Department of Education, ASME, and SWE.WPR 0314
Elizabeth “Pete” Plunkett Oral HistoryElizabeth "Pete" Plunkett was a successful engineer in the aviation and astronautical fields. She attended the University of Washington and began working for the Boeing Company her sophomore year. Plunkett stayed with the company her entire 37-year career, beginning as a draftsman and working her way up to Engineering Technical Laboratory Manager, where she oversaw two laboratories that provided experimental test facilities for all commercial airplanes. For several years she worked as a research analyst and test director for aeroelastic models of hypersonic orbital and space flight systems during the very beginning of the U.S. space program. During her career, Plunkett was an officer in both the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics and SWE, in which she remains a member.WPR 0315
Betty Preece Oral HistoryBetty Preece is a distinguished secondary and college educator in science, math, and engineering. In 1947 she was the first female electrical engineering graduate of the University of Kentucky and upon graduation worked as an engineer for General Electric and then as a project engineer/section chief of surveillance systems for the Air Force Missile Test Center at Cape Canaveral during the early years of the aerospace program. Preece went on to serve as editor of the Indian River Engineer for the Institute of Radio Engineers in the early 1960s and thereafter worked in academia, upon earning a M.S. in Science Education. She served simultaneously as a high school physics teacher and adjunct faculty at the Florida Institute of Technology for over 20 years. An early SWE member and a longstanding member of several professional organizations, Preece has been actively involved in career guidance for women engineers and scientists, leading workshops on the local, state, national, and international levels since 1965. She was a member of the Working Panel of Women as Engineering Technicians, Office of Emergency Planning, Office of the President of the United States from 1962-64; and selected to the Florida Advisory Council for Science Education in 1986 in recognition of her work in science education.WPR 0316
Gloria Reinish Oral HistoryGloria Reinish was the first woman to receive an undergraduate degree, a master’s degree (both in electrical engineering), and a doctorate (in bioengineering) from Columbia University. She began her career in industry, working for Bell Labs, primarily in research and development of radar systems and telephone repeaters, and Sperry Gyroscope, where she earned a patent on radar ranging systems. Reinish turned to academia as a career when she was completing her Ph.D. At Fairleigh Dickinson University since 1961, Reinish has taught both electrical and biomedical engineering, becoming a full professor in 1976. Her own research focuses on the electrical properties of bone and electrical stimulation of bone growth. She served as the chairperson of the electrical engineering department, the first woman appointed to that position, and chair of the bioengineering program for a number of years in the 1970s and 1980s. Reinish is a life member of IEEE and SWE where she has been very active with student members.WPR 0317
Margaret Taber Oral HistoryMargaret Taber is an electrical and electronics engineering educator whose career nearly parallels the development of electronic, or computer, technology. She graduated from Cleveland State University in 1958 with two bachelor degrees, one in electrical engineering, and the other in engineering science, with an emphasis on math. During college and for a few years after, Taber worked in industry at the Tocco Division of The Ohio Crankshaft Company as an engineering trainee and Development Engineer. After obtaining her Master's of Science in Engineering from the University of Akron in 1967, Taber worked briefly as a digital systems consultant for Design and Development Inc. It was during this time that Taber also began working in academia as an instructor in Electrical-Electronic Engineering at Cuyahoga Community College. She went on to become an assistant, associate, and full professor as well as Chairperson of Engineering Technologies at the college. In 1976, Taber received an Ed.D. from Nova Southeastern University in Fort Lauderdale, Florida and in 1979 she became both an Associate Professor at Purdue University and an Educational Consultant and Writer for the Cleveland Institute of Electronics. Taber was the only woman faculty member of the University's Department of Electrical Engineering Technology, but quickly received tenure as an associate professor, was made full professor (1983-2000), and became a Professor Emeritus in 2000. She has designed, developed, and taught many fundamental and advanced microprocessor courses. She has also written several books/manuals and articles on computer programming. Taber has been extremely supportive of women in engineering, establishing awards at Purdue given annually to the best women students in Electrical Engineering Technology and Mechanical Engineering Technology. She has had computer labs named in her honor and received many distinctions, including outstanding alumni awards and SWE's 1987 Distinguished Engineering Educator Award. A licensed professional engineer and certified engineering technologist, Taber is a Fellow Life Member of SWE; a Life Member of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers; and member of the American Society for Engineering Education and the American Technical Education Association.WPR 0318
Josephine “Jo” Webb Oral HistoryJosephine Webb graduated from Purdue University in 1940 and became a Buhl Research Fellow in the Electrical Engineering Department of the Carnegie Institute of Technology for two years. In 1942 she joined Westinghouse Electric Corporation as a Design Engineer, where among other duties, she worked on the electrical grids for the Coulee, Hoover, and Boulder Dams. It was during her tenure with the company that she obtained two patents for oil circuit breaker contact design. In 1946, Webb became Director of Development for the Facsimile Development Laboratory at the Alden Products Company where she designed an eighteen-inch, full newspaper size fax machine with exceptional resolution for that time. Following a brief tenure at the Foxboro Instrument Company, Webb went into business for herself, co-founding Webb Consulting Company with her husband, also an electrical engineer. They specialized in electrical-electronic measurement instrumentation, communications applications, and photographic test devices, working for clients as diverse as Boeing and the U.S. Bureau of Mines. In addition to the consulting business, Webb also took a position in 1977 with North Idaho College where she began development of a Computer Center and worked on several government grants for enhancing the campus and its educational programs. Webb holds four patents for her innovative work and has been active in many professional organizations including IEEE, NSPE, and SWE where she holds Fellows status.WPR 0319
George Gaines Oral HistoryOral history interview.WPR 0765
Jean Ernst Mayfield Oral HistoryOral history interview.WPR 0766
Robert Brown Oral HistoryInterviews conducted between 1979-1982 related to the establishment and growth of the Migrant Ministry. Transcripts located in Boxes 2-3 of the Sydney D. Smith Collection.WPR 0321
John Crossley Oral HistoryInterviews conducted between 1979-1982 related to the establishment and growth of the Migrant Ministry. Transcripts located in Boxes 2-3 of the Sydney D. Smith Collection.WPR 0322
Rev. James Drake Oral HistoryInterviews conducted between 1979-1982 related to the establishment and growth of the Migrant Ministry. Transcripts located in Boxes 2-3 of the Sydney D. Smith Collection.WPR 0323
Bill Drew Oral HistoryInterviews conducted between 1979-1982 related to the establishment and growth of the Migrant Ministry. Transcripts located in Boxes 2-3 of the Sydney D. Smith Collection.WPR 0324
Benjamin Fraticelli Oral HistoryInterviews conducted between 1979-1982 related to the establishment and growth of the Migrant Ministry. Transcripts located in Boxes 2-3 of the Sydney D. Smith Collection.WPR 0325
Chris Hartmire Oral HistoryInterviews conducted between 1979-1982 related to the establishment and growth of the Migrant Ministry. Transcripts located in Boxes 2-3 of the Sydney D. Smith Collection.WPR 0326
Pat Hoffman Oral HistoryInterviews conducted between 1979-1982 related to the establishment and growth of the Migrant Ministry. Transcripts located in Boxes 2-3 of the Sydney D. Smith Collection.WPR 0328
Pat and Cecil Hoffman Oral HistoryPat and Cecil Hoffman interview together.WPR 0329
Joseph Hough Oral HistoryInterviews conducted between 1979-1982 related to the establishment and growth of the Migrant Ministry. Transcripts located in Boxes 2-3 of the Sydney D. Smith Collection.WPR 0330
Karl Irvin Oral HistoryInterviews conducted between 1979-1982 related to the establishment and growth of the Migrant Ministry. Transcripts located in Boxes 2-3 of the Sydney D. Smith Collection.WPR 0331
Mary McFarland Oral HistoryInterviews conducted between 1979-1982 related to the establishment and growth of the Migrant Ministry. Transcripts located in Boxes 2-3 of the Sydney D. Smith Collection.WPR 0332
Dr. Richard Norberg Oral HistoryInterviews conducted between 1979-1982 related to the establishment and growth of the Migrant Ministry. Transcripts located in Boxes 2-3 of the Sydney D. Smith Collection.WPR 0333
Henry Pavian Oral HistoryInterviews conducted between 1979-1982 related to the establishment and growth of the Migrant Ministry. Transcripts located in Boxes 2-3 of the Sydney D. Smith Collection.WPR 0334
Rev. Walter Press Oral HistoryInterviews conducted between 1979-1982 related to the establishment and growth of the Migrant Ministry. Transcripts located in Boxes 2-3 of the Sydney D. Smith Collection.WPR 0335
Dr. Jon Regier Oral HistoryInterviews conducted between 1979-1982 related to the establishment and growth of the Migrant Ministry. Transcripts located in Boxes 2-3 of the Sydney D. Smith Collection.WPR 0336
Don Reynolds Oral HistoryInterviews conducted between 1979-1982 related to the establishment and growth of the Migrant Ministry. Transcripts located in Boxes 2-3 of the Sydney D. Smith Collection.WPR 0337
Sandy Sample Oral HistoryInterviews conducted between 1979-1982 related to the establishment and growth of the Migrant Ministry. Transcripts located in Boxes 2-3 of the Sydney D. Smith Collection.WPR 0338
Ted and Blanch Schmidt Oral HistoryTed and Blanch Schmidt interview together.WPR 0339
Rev. William Scholes Oral HistoryInterviews conducted between 1979-1982 related to the establishment and growth of the Migrant Ministry. Transcripts located in Boxes 2-3 of the Sydney D. Smith Collection.WPR 0340
Rev. David Sholin Oral HistoryInterviews conducted between 1979-1982 related to the establishment and growth of the Migrant Ministry. Transcripts located in Boxes 2-3 of the Sydney D. Smith Collection.WPR 0341
Rev. Douglas Still Oral HistoryInterviews conducted between 1979-1982 related to the establishment and growth of the Migrant Ministry. Transcripts located in Boxes 2-3 of the Sydney D. Smith Collection.WPR 0342
Keith & Fran Taeger Oral HistoryInterviews conducted between 1979-1982 related to the establishment and growth of the Migrant Ministry. Transcripts located in Boxes 2-3 of the Sydney D. Smith Collection.WPR 0343
Dr. Forest Weir Oral HistoryInterviews conducted between 1979-1982 related to the establishment and growth of the Migrant Ministry. Transcripts located in Boxes 2-3 of the Sydney D. Smith Collection.WPR 0344
Dr. Harold Wilson Oral HistoryInterviews conducted between 1979-1982 related to the establishment and growth of the Migrant Ministry. Transcripts located in Boxes 2-3 of the Sydney D. Smith Collection.WPR 0345
Winthrop Yinger Oral HistoryInterviews conducted between 1979-1982 related to the establishment and growth of the Migrant Ministry. Transcripts located in Boxes 2-3 of the Sydney D. Smith Collection.WPR 0346
Lester Fox Oral HistoryInterviews conducted by Loren E. Pennington as part of his research on Studebaker.WPR 0347
T. Forrest Hanna Oral HistoryInterviews conducted by Loren E. Pennington as part of his research on Studebaker.WPR 0348
J.D. “Red” Hill Oral HistoryInterviews conducted by Loren E. Pennington as part of his research on Studebaker.WPR 0349
George Hupp Oral HistoryInterviews conducted by Loren E. Pennington as part of his research on Studebaker.WPR 0350
C.M. MacMillan Oral HistoryInterviews conducted by Loren E. Pennington as part of his research on Studebaker.WPR 0351
William Ogden Oral HistoryInterviews conducted by Loren E. Pennington as part of his research on Studebaker.WPR 0352
Archie Acciacca Oral HistoryInterviews conducted by Judith Stepan-Norris and Maurice Zeitlin for their book, Talking Union, a history of the organization and early years of UAW Local 600., the local representing workers at Ford’s Rouge plant.WPR 0353
Ken Bannon Oral HistoryInterviews conducted by Judith Stepan-Norris and Maurice Zeitlin for their book, Talking Union, a history of the organization and early years of UAW Local 600., the local representing workers at Ford’s Rouge plant.WPR 0354
Ann & Paul Boatin Oral HistoryInterviews conducted by Judith Stepan-Norris and Maurice Zeitlin for their book, Talking Union, a history of the organization and early years of UAW Local 600., the local representing workers at Ford’s Rouge plant.WPR 0355
Walter Dorosh Oral HistoryInterviews conducted by Judith Stepan-Norris and Maurice Zeitlin for their book, Talking Union, a history of the organization and early years of UAW Local 600., the local representing workers at Ford’s Rouge plant.WPR 0356
William Johnson Oral HistoryInterviews conducted by Judith Stepan-Norris and Maurice Zeitlin for their book, Talking Union, a history of the organization and early years of UAW Local 600., the local representing workers at Ford’s Rouge plant.WPR 0357
John Mando Oral HistoryInterviews conducted by Judith Stepan-Norris and Maurice Zeitlin for their book, Talking Union, a history of the organization and early years of UAW Local 600., the local representing workers at Ford’s Rouge plant.WPR 0358
Henry McCusker Oral HistoryInterviews conducted by Judith Stepan-Norris and Maurice Zeitlin for their book, Talking Union, a history of the organization and early years of UAW Local 600., the local representing workers at Ford’s Rouge plant.WPR 0359
Arthur McPhaul Oral HistoryInterviews conducted by Judith Stepan-Norris and Maurice Zeitlin for their book, Talking Union, a history of the organization and early years of UAW Local 600., the local representing workers at Ford’s Rouge plant.WPR 0360
David Moore Oral HistoryInterviews conducted by Judith Stepan-Norris and Maurice Zeitlin for their book, Talking Union, a history of the organization and early years of UAW Local 600., the local representing workers at Ford’s Rouge plant.WPR 0361
Stanley & Margaret Nowak Oral HistoryInterviews conducted by Judith Stepan-Norris and Maurice Zeitlin for their book, Talking Union, a history of the organization and early years of UAW Local 600., the local representing workers at Ford’s Rouge plant.WPR 0362
John Orr Oral HistoryInterviews conducted by Judith Stepan-Norris and Maurice Zeitlin for their book, Talking Union, a history of the organization and early years of UAW Local 600., the local representing workers at Ford’s Rouge plant.WPR 0363
George Pluhar Oral HistoryInterviews conducted by Judith Stepan-Norris and Maurice Zeitlin for their book, Talking Union, a history of the organization and early years of UAW Local 600., the local representing workers at Ford’s Rouge plant.WPR 0364
Victor Reuther Oral HistoryInterviews conducted by Judith Stepan-Norris and Maurice Zeitlin for their book, Talking Union, a history of the organization and early years of UAW Local 600., the local representing workers at Ford’s Rouge plant.WPR 0365
Deloris & Kenneth Roche Oral HistoryInterviews conducted by Judith Stepan-Norris and Maurice Zeitlin for their book, Talking Union, a history of the organization and early years of UAW Local 600., the local representing workers at Ford’s Rouge plant.WPR 0366
John Saari Oral HistoryInterviews conducted by Judith Stepan-Norris and Maurice Zeitlin for their book, Talking Union, a history of the organization and early years of UAW Local 600., the local representing workers at Ford’s Rouge plant.WPR 0367
Horace Sheffield Oral HistoryInterviews conducted by Judith Stepan-Norris and Maurice Zeitlin for their book, Talking Union, a history of the organization and early years of UAW Local 600., the local representing workers at Ford’s Rouge plant.WPR 0368
Shelton Tappes Oral HistoryInterviews conducted by Judith Stepan-Norris and Maurice Zeitlin for their book, Talking Union, a history of the organization and early years of UAW Local 600., the local representing workers at Ford’s Rouge plant.WPR 0369
Thomas Yeager Oral HistoryInterviews conducted by Judith Stepan-Norris and Maurice Zeitlin for their book, Talking Union, a history of the organization and early years of UAW Local 600., the local representing workers at Ford’s Rouge plant.WPR 0370
Mike Zarro Oral HistoryInterviews conducted by Judith Stepan-Norris and Maurice Zeitlin for their book, Talking Union, a history of the organization and early years of UAW Local 600., the local representing workers at Ford’s Rouge plant.WPR 0371
Mary Baker Oral HistoryAugusta Building Trades CouncilWPR 0372
Sara Barron Oral HistoryACWAWPR 0373
Mary Callahan Oral HistoryIUEWPR 0374
Sophie Cohen Oral HistoryIWWWPR 0375
Belulah Compton Oral HistoryWaitresses’ UnionWPR 0376
Catherine Conroy Oral HistoryCWAWPR 0377
Clara Day Oral HistoryIBTWPR 0378
Jessie La Cruz Oral HistoryUFWWPR 0379
Evelyn Dubrow Oral HistoryILGWUWPR 0380
Mary Elkuss Oral HistoryACWAWPR 0381
Marie Fese Oral HistoryBRACWPR 0382
Sara Fredgrant Oral HistoryACWAWPR 0383
Caroline Gladstein Oral HistoryCAWIUWPR 0384
Charlotte Graham Oral HistoryILGWUWPR 0385
Dorothy Haener Oral HistoryUAWWPR 0386
Lilian Herstein Oral HistoryAFTWPR 0387
Mildred Jeffrey Oral HistoryUAWWPR 0388
Brownie Jones Oral HistoryALESWPR 0389
Maida Kemp Oral HistoryILGWUWPR 0390
Ola Kennedy Oral HistoryUSWAWPR 0391
Elizabeth Kimmel Oral HistoryILGWUWPR 0392
Dorothy & Henry Kraus Oral HistoryUAWWPR 0393
Mollie LeVitas Oral HistoryOPEIUWPR 0394
Carmen Lucia Oral HistoryUHCMWWPR 0395
Minnie Lunsford Oral HistoryUMWWPR 0396
Florence Lynch Oral HistoryURWWPR 0397
Julia Maietta Oral HistoryACWAWPR 0398
Joyce Maupin Oral HistoryUnion WAGEWPR 0399
Ah McElrath Oral HistoryILWUWPR 0400
Eula McGill Oral HistoryACWAWPR 0401
Barbara Merrill Oral HistoryACTWUWPR 0402
Julie Mount Oral HistoryUCAPAWAWPR 0403
Arline Neal Oral HistorySEIUWPR 0404
Fannie Neal Oral HistoryAFL-CIOWPR 0405
Pauline Newman Oral HistoryILGWUWPR 0406
Elizabeth Nord Oral HistoryTWUAWPR 0407
Rose Norwood Oral HistoryWTULWPR 0408
Karen Nussbaum Oral History9 to 5WPR 0409
Rose Palmquist Oral HistoryIBTWPR 0410
Esther Peterson Oral HistoryACWAWPR 0411
Florence Peterson Oral HistoryUAWWPR 0412
Alice Peurala Oral HistoryUSWAWPR 0413
Celia Pincus Oral HistoryAFTWPR 0414
Antoinette Podojil Oral HistoryTWUAWPR 0415
Geraldine Roberts Oral HistoryUDWAWPR 0416
Lillian Roberts Oral HistoryAFSCMEWPR 0417
Dollie Robinson Oral HistoryACWAWPR 0418
Margaret Scattergood Oral HistoryAFLWPR 0419
Frieda Schwenkmeyer Oral HistoryACWAWPR 0420
Bonnie Segal Oral HistoryILGWUWPR 0421
Anna Sullivan Oral HistoryTWUAWPR 0422
Gertrude Sweet Oral HistoryHEREWPR 0423
Pauline Taylor Oral HistoryProgressive PartyWPR 0424
Lucille Thornburgh Oral HistoryTWUAWPR 0425
Doris Turner Oral History1199 / SEIUWPR 0426
Regina Urdaneta Oral HistoryACWAWPR 0427
Angela Ward Oral HistoryOWUWPR 0428
Barbara Wertheimer Oral HistoryEducatorWPR 0429
Ruth Wiencek Oral HistoryCWAWPR 0430
Nelle Wooding Oral HistoryCWAWPR 0431
Florence Luscomb Oral HistoryWTULWPR 0432
George F. Addes Oral HistoryConducted by Jack W. Skeels between 1959 and 1963 as part of a University of Michigan - Wayne State University Institute of Labor and Industrial Relations project to document the early years of the United Automobile Workers union. All interviews contain releases.releases.WPR 0433
Stanley Gregory Oral HistoryConducted by Jack W. Skeels between 1959 and 1963 as part of a University of Michigan - Wayne State University Institute of Labor and Industrial Relations project to document the early years of the United Automobile Workers union. All interviews contain releases.releases.WPR 0434
Joseph Pagano Oral HistoryConducted by Jack W. Skeels between 1959 and 1963 as part of a University of Michigan - Wayne State University Institute of Labor and Industrial Relations project to document the early years of the United Automobile Workers union. All interviews contain releases.releases.WPR 0435
Louis Adkins Oral HistoryConducted by Jack W. Skeels between 1959 and 1963 as part of a University of Michigan - Wayne State University Institute of Labor and Industrial Relations project to document the early years of the United Automobile Workers union. All interviews contain releases.releases.WPR 0436
Carl Haessler Oral HistoryConducted by Jack W. Skeels between 1959 and 1963 as part of a University of Michigan - Wayne State University Institute of Labor and Industrial Relations project to document the early years of the United Automobile Workers union. All interviews contain releases.WPR 0437
F. Palmer Oral HistoryConducted by Jack W. Skeels between 1959 and 1963 as part of a University of Michigan - Wayne State University Institute of Labor and Industrial Relations project to document the early years of the United Automobile Workers union. All interviews contain releases.WPR 0438
John Anderson Oral HistoryConducted by Jack W. Skeels between 1959 and 1963 as part of a University of Michigan - Wayne State University Institute of Labor and Industrial Relations project to document the early years of the United Automobile Workers union. All interviews contain releases.WPR 0439
Fred Haggard Oral HistoryConducted by Jack W. Skeels between 1959 and 1963 as part of a University of Michigan - Wayne State University Institute of Labor and Industrial Relations project to document the early years of the United Automobile Workers union. All interviews contain releases.WPR 0440
John Panzner Oral HistoryConducted by Jack W. Skeels between 1959 and 1963 as part of a University of Michigan - Wayne State University Institute of Labor and Industrial Relations project to document the early years of the United Automobile Workers union. All interviews contain releases.WPR 0441
Kenneth F. Bannon Oral HistoryConducted by Jack W. Skeels between 1959 and 1963 as part of a University of Michigan - Wayne State University Institute of Labor and Industrial Relations project to document the early years of the United Automobile Workers union. All interviews contain releases.WPR 0442
Ed Hall Oral HistoryConducted by Jack W. Skeels between 1959 and 1963 as part of a University of Michigan - Wayne State University Institute of Labor and Industrial Relations project to document the early years of the United Automobile Workers union. All interviews contain releases.WPR 0443
William Payne Oral HistoryConducted by Jack W. Skeels between 1959 and 1963 as part of a University of Michigan - Wayne State University Institute of Labor and Industrial Relations project to document the early years of the United Automobile Workers union. All interviews contain releases.WPR 0444
John Bartee Oral HistoryConducted by Jack W. Skeels between 1959 and 1963 as part of a University of Michigan - Wayne State University Institute of Labor and Industrial Relations project to document the early years of the United Automobile Workers union. All interviews contain releases.WPR 0445
Matthew Hammond Oral HistoryConducted by Jack W. Skeels between 1959 and 1963 as part of a University of Michigan - Wayne State University Institute of Labor and Industrial Relations project to document the early years of the United Automobile Workers union. All interviews contain releases.WPR 0446
Orrin Peppler Oral HistoryConducted by Jack W. Skeels between 1959 and 1963 as part of a University of Michigan - Wayne State University Institute of Labor and Industrial Relations project to document the early years of the United Automobile Workers union. All interviews contain releases.WPR 0447
Charles Beckman Oral HistoryConducted by Jack W. Skeels between 1959 and 1963 as part of a University of Michigan - Wayne State University Institute of Labor and Industrial Relations project to document the early years of the United Automobile Workers union. All interviews contain releases.WPR 0448
Richard Harris Oral HistoryConducted by Jack W. Skeels between 1959 and 1963 as part of a University of Michigan - Wayne State University Institute of Labor and Industrial Relations project to document the early years of the United Automobile Workers union. All interviews contain releases.WPR 0449
Joseph Piconke Oral HistoryConducted by Jack W. Skeels between 1959 and 1963 as part of a University of Michigan - Wayne State University Institute of Labor and Industrial Relations project to document the early years of the United Automobile Workers union. All interviews contain releases.WPR 0450
J. Beni Oral HistoryConducted by Jack W. Skeels between 1959 and 1963 as part of a University of Michigan - Wayne State University Institute of Labor and Industrial Relations project to document the early years of the United Automobile Workers union. All interviews contain releases.WPR 0451
Joseph Hattley Oral HistoryConducted by Jack W. Skeels between 1959 and 1963 as part of a University of Michigan - Wayne State University Institute of Labor and Industrial Relations project to document the early years of the United Automobile Workers union. All interviews contain releases.WPR 0452
Leon Pody Oral HistoryConducted by Jack W. Skeels between 1959 and 1963 as part of a University of Michigan - Wayne State University Institute of Labor and Industrial Relations project to document the early years of the United Automobile Workers union. All interviews contain releases.WPR 0453
Raymond Berndt Oral HistoryConducted by Jack W. Skeels between 1959 and 1963 as part of a University of Michigan - Wayne State University Institute of Labor and Industrial Relations project to document the early years of the United Automobile Workers union. All interviews contain releases.WPR 0454
Arthur Hughs Oral HistoryConducted by Jack W. Skeels between 1959 and 1963 as part of a University of Michigan - Wayne State University Institute of Labor and Industrial Relations project to document the early years of the United Automobile Workers union. All interviews contain releases.WPR 0455
Adam Poplewski Oral HistoryConducted by Jack W. Skeels between 1959 and 1963 as part of a University of Michigan - Wayne State University Institute of Labor and Industrial Relations project to document the early years of the United Automobile Workers union. All interviews contain releases.WPR 0456
Merlin Bishop Oral HistoryConducted by Jack W. Skeels between 1959 and 1963 as part of a University of Michigan - Wayne State University Institute of Labor and Industrial Relations project to document the early years of the United Automobile Workers union. All interviews contain releases.WPR 0457
William Humphreys Oral HistoryConducted by Jack W. Skeels between 1959 and 1963 as part of a University of Michigan - Wayne State University Institute of Labor and Industrial Relations project to document the early years of the United Automobile Workers union. All interviews contain releases.WPR 0458
Gene Prato Oral HistoryConducted by Jack W. Skeels between 1959 and 1963 as part of a University of Michigan - Wayne State University Institute of Labor and Industrial Relations project to document the early years of the United Automobile Workers union. All interviews contain releases.WPR 0459
Stanley Brams Oral HistoryConducted by Jack W. Skeels between 1959 and 1963 as part of a University of Michigan - Wayne State University Institute of Labor and Industrial Relations project to document the early years of the United Automobile Workers union. All interviews contain releases.WPR 0460
Jack Hurst Oral HistoryConducted by Jack W. Skeels between 1959 and 1963 as part of a University of Michigan - Wayne State University Institute of Labor and Industrial Relations project to document the early years of the United Automobile Workers union. All interviews contain releases.WPR 0461
Edward Purdy Oral HistoryConducted by Jack W. Skeels between 1959 and 1963 as part of a University of Michigan - Wayne State University Institute of Labor and Industrial Relations project to document the early years of the United Automobile Workers union. All interviews contain releases.WPR 0462
Norman Bully Oral HistoryConducted by Jack W. Skeels between 1959 and 1963 as part of a University of Michigan - Wayne State University Institute of Labor and Industrial Relations project to document the early years of the United Automobile Workers union. All interviews contain releases.WPR 0463
R. Ingram Oral HistoryConducted by Jack W. Skeels between 1959 and 1963 as part of a University of Michigan - Wayne State University Institute of Labor and Industrial Relations project to document the early years of the United Automobile Workers union. All interviews contain releases.WPR 0464
Walter Quillico Oral HistoryConducted by Jack W. Skeels between 1959 and 1963 as part of a University of Michigan - Wayne State University Institute of Labor and Industrial Relations project to document the early years of the United Automobile Workers union. All interviews contain releases.WPR 0465
George Burt Oral HistoryConducted by Jack W. Skeels between 1959 and 1963 as part of a University of Michigan - Wayne State University Institute of Labor and Industrial Relations project to document the early years of the United Automobile Workers union. All interviews contain releases.WPR 0466
Forest Innis Oral HistoryConducted by Jack W. Skeels between 1959 and 1963 as part of a University of Michigan - Wayne State University Institute of Labor and Industrial Relations project to document the early years of the United Automobile Workers union. All interviews contain releases.WPR 0467
Philip Raymond Oral HistoryConducted by Jack W. Skeels between 1959 and 1963 as part of a University of Michigan - Wayne State University Institute of Labor and Industrial Relations project to document the early years of the United Automobile Workers union. All interviews contain releases.WPR 0468
Ed Carey Oral HistoryConducted by Jack W. Skeels between 1959 and 1963 as part of a University of Michigan - Wayne State University Institute of Labor and Industrial Relations project to document the early years of the United Automobile Workers union. All interviews contain releases.WPR 0469
Martin Jensen Oral HistoryConducted by Jack W. Skeels between 1959 and 1963 as part of a University of Michigan - Wayne State University Institute of Labor and Industrial Relations project to document the early years of the United Automobile Workers union. All interviews contain releases.WPR 0470
May Reuther Oral HistoryConducted by Jack W. Skeels between 1959 and 1963 as part of a University of Michigan - Wayne State University Institute of Labor and Industrial Relations project to document the early years of the United Automobile Workers union. All interviews contain releases.WPR 0471
Arthur Case Oral HistoryConducted by Jack W. Skeels between 1959 and 1963 as part of a University of Michigan - Wayne State University Institute of Labor and Industrial Relations project to document the early years of the United Automobile Workers union. All interviews contain releases.WPR 0472
Clayton Johnson Oral HistoryConducted by Jack W. Skeels between 1959 and 1963 as part of a University of Michigan - Wayne State University Institute of Labor and Industrial Relations project to document the early years of the United Automobile Workers union. All interviews contain releases.WPR 0473
Victor Reuther Oral Historyincludes correspondenceWPR 0474
James Cleveland Oral HistoryConducted by Jack W. Skeels between 1959 and 1963 as part of a University of Michigan - Wayne State University Institute of Labor and Industrial Relations project to document the early years of the United Automobile Workers union. All interviews contain releases.WPR 0475
Lester Johnson Oral HistoryConducted by Jack W. Skeels between 1959 and 1963 as part of a University of Michigan - Wayne State University Institute of Labor and Industrial Relations project to document the early years of the United Automobile Workers union. All interviews contain releases.WPR 0476
Herbert Richardson Oral HistoryConducted by Jack W. Skeels between 1959 and 1963 as part of a University of Michigan - Wayne State University Institute of Labor and Industrial Relations project to document the early years of the United Automobile Workers union. All interviews contain releases.WPR 0477
Richard Coleman Oral HistoryConducted by Jack W. Skeels between 1959 and 1963 as part of a University of Michigan - Wayne State University Institute of Labor and Industrial Relations project to document the early years of the United Automobile Workers union. All interviews contain releases.WPR 0478
Lloyd Jones Oral HistoryConducted by Jack W. Skeels between 1959 and 1963 as part of a University of Michigan - Wayne State University Institute of Labor and Industrial Relations project to document the early years of the United Automobile Workers union. All interviews contain releases.WPR 0479
John F. Ringwald Oral HistoryConducted by Jack W. Skeels between 1959 and 1963 as part of a University of Michigan - Wayne State University Institute of Labor and Industrial Relations project to document the early years of the United Automobile Workers union. All interviews contain releases.WPR 0480
Charles Conway Oral HistoryConducted by Jack W. Skeels between 1959 and 1963 as part of a University of Michigan - Wayne State University Institute of Labor and Industrial Relations project to document the early years of the United Automobile Workers union. All interviews contain releases.WPR 0481
Robert Kanter Oral HistoryConducted by Jack W. Skeels between 1959 and 1963 as part of a University of Michigan - Wayne State University Institute of Labor and Industrial Relations project to document the early years of the United Automobile Workers union. All interviews contain releases.WPR 0482
Arthur Rohan Oral HistoryConducted by Jack W. Skeels between 1959 and 1963 as part of a University of Michigan - Wayne State University Institute of Labor and Industrial Relations project to document the early years of the United Automobile Workers union. All interviews contain releases.WPR 0483
Jack T. Conway Oral HistoryConducted by Jack W. Skeels between 1959 and 1963 as part of a University of Michigan - Wayne State University Institute of Labor and Industrial Relations project to document the early years of the United Automobile Workers union. All interviews contain releases.WPR 0484
Harvey Kitzman Oral HistoryConducted by Jack W. Skeels between 1959 and 1963 as part of a University of Michigan - Wayne State University Institute of Labor and Industrial Relations project to document the early years of the United Automobile Workers union. All interviews contain releases.WPR 0485
James Roland Oral HistoryConducted by Jack W. Skeels between 1959 and 1963 as part of a University of Michigan - Wayne State University Institute of Labor and Industrial Relations project to document the early years of the United Automobile Workers union. All interviews contain releases.WPR 0486
Alexander Cook Oral HistoryConducted by Jack W. Skeels between 1959 and 1963 as part of a University of Michigan - Wayne State University Institute of Labor and Industrial Relations project to document the early years of the United Automobile Workers union. All interviews contain releases.WPR 0487
Tom Klasey Oral HistoryConducted by Jack W. Skeels between 1959 and 1963 as part of a University of Michigan - Wayne State University Institute of Labor and Industrial Relations project to document the early years of the United Automobile Workers union. All interviews contain releases.WPR 0488
Harry Ross Oral HistoryConducted by Jack W. Skeels between 1959 and 1963 as part of a University of Michigan - Wayne State University Institute of Labor and Industrial Relations project to document the early years of the United Automobile Workers union. All interviews contain releases.WPR 0489
Leonard Klue Oral HistoryConducted by Jack W. Skeels between 1959 and 1963 as part of a University of Michigan - Wayne State University Institute of Labor and Industrial Relations project to document the early years of the United Automobile Workers union. All interviews contain releases.WPR 0490
Paul Russo Oral HistoryConducted by Jack W. Skeels between 1959 and 1963 as part of a University of Michigan - Wayne State University Institute of Labor and Industrial Relations project to document the early years of the United Automobile Workers union. All interviews contain releases.WPR 0491
Harold Cranefield Oral HistoryConducted by Jack W. Skeels between 1959 and 1963 as part of a University of Michigan - Wayne State University Institute of Labor and Industrial Relations project to document the early years of the United Automobile Workers union. All interviews contain releases.WPR 0492
Theodore Laduke Oral HistoryConducted by Jack W. Skeels between 1959 and 1963 as part of a University of Michigan - Wayne State University Institute of Labor and Industrial Relations project to document the early years of the United Automobile Workers union. All interviews contain releases.WPR 0493
Sam Sage Oral HistoryConducted by Jack W. Skeels between 1959 and 1963 as part of a University of Michigan - Wayne State University Institute of Labor and Industrial Relations project to document the early years of the United Automobile Workers union. All interviews contain releases.WPR 0494
Larry Davidow Oral HistoryConducted by Jack W. Skeels between 1959 and 1963 as part of a University of Michigan - Wayne State University Institute of Labor and Industrial Relations project to document the early years of the United Automobile Workers union. All interviews contain releases.WPR 0495
Monroe Lake Oral Historyincludes correspondenceWPR 0496
Frank Sahorske Oral HistoryConducted by Jack W. Skeels between 1959 and 1963 as part of a University of Michigan - Wayne State University Institute of Labor and Industrial Relations project to document the early years of the United Automobile Workers union. All interviews contain releases.WPR 0497
Len DeCaux Oral HistoryConducted by Jack W. Skeels between 1959 and 1963 as part of a University of Michigan - Wayne State University Institute of Labor and Industrial Relations project to document the early years of the United Automobile Workers union. All interviews contain releases.WPR 0498
Russell Leach Oral HistoryConducted by Jack W. Skeels between 1959 and 1963 as part of a University of Michigan - Wayne State University Institute of Labor and Industrial Relations project to document the early years of the United Automobile Workers union. All interviews contain releases.WPR 0499
Walter Schilling Oral HistoryIn a volume with Charles ConwayWPR 0500
Nick DiGaetano Oral HistoryConducted by Jack W. Skeels between 1959 and 1963 as part of a University of Michigan - Wayne State University Institute of Labor and Industrial Relations project to document the early years of the United Automobile Workers union. All interviews contain releases.WPR 0501
Edgar Lee Oral HistoryConducted by Jack W. Skeels between 1959 and 1963 as part of a University of Michigan - Wayne State University Institute of Labor and Industrial Relations project to document the early years of the United Automobile Workers union. All interviews contain releases.WPR 0502
Leo Shaffer Oral HistoryConducted by Jack W. Skeels between 1959 and 1963 as part of a University of Michigan - Wayne State University Institute of Labor and Industrial Relations project to document the early years of the United Automobile Workers union. All interviews contain releases.WPR 0503
Joseph Ditzel Oral HistoryConducted by Jack W. Skeels between 1959 and 1963 as part of a University of Michigan - Wayne State University Institute of Labor and Industrial Relations project to document the early years of the United Automobile Workers union. All interviews contain releases.WPR 0504
Al Leggat Oral HistoryConducted by Jack W. Skeels between 1959 and 1963 as part of a University of Michigan - Wayne State University Institute of Labor and Industrial Relations project to document the early years of the United Automobile Workers union. All interviews contain releases.WPR 0505
Bud Simmons Oral HistoryConducted by Jack W. Skeels between 1959 and 1963 as part of a University of Michigan - Wayne State University Institute of Labor and Industrial Relations project to document the early years of the United Automobile Workers union. All interviews contain releases.WPR 0506
James F. Doherty Oral HistoryIn a volume with Charles ConwayWPR 0507
Frank Manfred Oral HistoryConducted by Jack W. Skeels between 1959 and 1963 as part of a University of Michigan - Wayne State University Institute of Labor and Industrial Relations project to document the early years of the United Automobile Workers union. All interviews contain releases.WPR 0508
Samuel Smith Oral HistoryConducted by Jack W. Skeels between 1959 and 1963 as part of a University of Michigan - Wayne State University Institute of Labor and Industrial Relations project to document the early years of the United Automobile Workers union. All interviews contain releases.WPR 0509
Tracy Doll Oral HistoryConducted by Jack W. Skeels between 1959 and 1963 as part of a University of Michigan - Wayne State University Institute of Labor and Industrial Relations project to document the early years of the United Automobile Workers union. All interviews contain releases.WPR 0510
Michael Manning Oral HistoryConducted by Jack W. Skeels between 1959 and 1963 as part of a University of Michigan - Wayne State University Institute of Labor and Industrial Relations project to document the early years of the United Automobile Workers union. All interviews contain releases.WPR 0511
Harry Southwell Oral HistoryConducted by Jack W. Skeels between 1959 and 1963 as part of a University of Michigan - Wayne State University Institute of Labor and Industrial Relations project to document the early years of the United Automobile Workers union. All interviews contain releases.WPR 0512
Genora Dollinger Oral HistoryOral history interview with Genora Dollinger about her involvement with the Flint sit-down strike, 1936-1937.WPR 0513
Frank Marquart Oral HistoryConducted by Jack W. Skeels between 1959 and 1963 as part of a University of Michigan - Wayne State University Institute of Labor and Industrial Relations project to document the early years of the United Automobile Workers union. All interviews contain releases.WPR 0514
Roy Speth Oral HistoryConducted by Jack W. Skeels between 1959 and 1963 as part of a University of Michigan - Wayne State University Institute of Labor and Industrial Relations project to document the early years of the United Automobile Workers union. All interviews contain releases.WPR 0515
Sol Dollinger Oral HistoryConducted by Jack W. Skeels between 1959 and 1963 as part of a University of Michigan - Wayne State University Institute of Labor and Industrial Relations project to document the early years of the United Automobile Workers union. All interviews contain releases.WPR 0516
Homer Martin Oral HistoryConducted by Jack W. Skeels between 1959 and 1963 as part of a University of Michigan - Wayne State University Institute of Labor and Industrial Relations project to document the early years of the United Automobile Workers union. All interviews contain releases.WPR 0517
William Stevenson Oral HistoryConducted by Jack W. Skeels between 1959 and 1963 as part of a University of Michigan - Wayne State University Institute of Labor and Industrial Relations project to document the early years of the United Automobile Workers union. All interviews contain releases.WPR 0518
Dominic Dornetto Oral HistoryConducted by Jack W. Skeels between 1959 and 1963 as part of a University of Michigan - Wayne State University Institute of Labor and Industrial Relations project to document the early years of the United Automobile Workers union. All interviews contain releases.WPR 0519
Norman Matthews Oral HistoryConducted by Jack W. Skeels between 1959 and 1963 as part of a University of Michigan - Wayne State University Institute of Labor and Industrial Relations project to document the early years of the United Automobile Workers union. All interviews contain releases.WPR 0520
Carl Swanson Oral HistoryConducted by Jack W. Skeels between 1959 and 1963 as part of a University of Michigan - Wayne State University Institute of Labor and Industrial Relations project to document the early years of the United Automobile Workers union. All interviews contain releases.WPR 0521
John Eldon Oral HistoryConducted by Jack W. Skeels between 1959 and 1963 as part of a University of Michigan - Wayne State University Institute of Labor and Industrial Relations project to document the early years of the United Automobile Workers union. All interviews contain releases.WPR 0522
Joseph Mattson Oral HistoryConducted by Jack W. Skeels between 1959 and 1963 as part of a University of Michigan - Wayne State University Institute of Labor and Industrial Relations project to document the early years of the United Automobile Workers union. All interviews contain releases.WPR 0523
Shelton Tappes Oral HistoryConducted by Jack W. Skeels between 1959 and 1963 as part of a University of Michigan - Wayne State University Institute of Labor and Industrial Relations project to document the early years of the United Automobile Workers union. All interviews contain releases.WPR 0524
Frank Fagan Oral HistoryConducted by Jack W. Skeels between 1959 and 1963 as part of a University of Michigan - Wayne State University Institute of Labor and Industrial Relations project to document the early years of the United Automobile Workers union. All interviews contain releases.WPR 0525
Elizabeth McCracken Oral HistoryConducted by Jack W. Skeels between 1959 and 1963 as part of a University of Michigan - Wayne State University Institute of Labor and Industrial Relations project to document the early years of the United Automobile Workers union. All interviews contain releases.WPR 0526
I. Taylor Oral HistoryConducted by Jack W. Skeels between 1959 and 1963 as part of a University of Michigan - Wayne State University Institute of Labor and Industrial Relations project to document the early years of the United Automobile Workers union. All interviews contain releases.WPR 0527
Jess Ferrazza Oral HistoryConducted by Jack W. Skeels between 1959 and 1963 as part of a University of Michigan - Wayne State University Institute of Labor and Industrial Relations project to document the early years of the United Automobile Workers union. All interviews contain releases.WPR 0528
John McDaniel Oral HistoryConducted by Jack W. Skeels between 1959 and 1963 as part of a University of Michigan - Wayne State University Institute of Labor and Industrial Relations project to document the early years of the United Automobile Workers union. All interviews contain releases.WPR 0529
R. Thomas Oral HistoryConducted by Jack W. Skeels between 1959 and 1963 as part of a University of Michigan - Wayne State University Institute of Labor and Industrial Relations project to document the early years of the United Automobile Workers union. All interviews contain releases.WPR 0530
Joseph Ferris Oral HistoryConducted by Jack W. Skeels between 1959 and 1963 as part of a University of Michigan - Wayne State University Institute of Labor and Industrial Relations project to document the early years of the United Automobile Workers union. All interviews contain releases.WPR 0531
Hugh Thompson Oral HistoryConducted by Jack W. Skeels between 1959 and 1963 as part of a University of Michigan - Wayne State University Institute of Labor and Industrial Relations project to document the early years of the United Automobile Workers union. All interviews contain releases.WPR 0532
Bert Foster Oral HistoryConducted by Jack W. Skeels between 1959 and 1963 as part of a University of Michigan - Wayne State University Institute of Labor and Industrial Relations project to document the early years of the United Automobile Workers union. All interviews contain releases.WPR 0533
George Merrelli Oral HistoryConducted by Jack W. Skeels between 1959 and 1963 as part of a University of Michigan - Wayne State University Institute of Labor and Industrial Relations project to document the early years of the United Automobile Workers union. All interviews contain releases.WPR 0534
Frank Tuttle Oral HistoryConducted by Jack W. Skeels between 1959 and 1963 as part of a University of Michigan - Wayne State University Institute of Labor and Industrial Relations project to document the early years of the United Automobile Workers union. All interviews contain releases.WPR 0535
Everett Francis Oral HistoryConducted by Jack W. Skeels between 1959 and 1963 as part of a University of Michigan - Wayne State University Institute of Labor and Industrial Relations project to document the early years of the United Automobile Workers union. All interviews contain releases.WPR 0536
Russell Merrill Oral HistoryConducted by Jack W. Skeels between 1959 and 1963 as part of a University of Michigan - Wayne State University Institute of Labor and Industrial Relations project to document the early years of the United Automobile Workers union. All interviews contain releases.WPR 0537
Art Vega Oral HistoryConducted by Jack W. Skeels between 1959 and 1963 as part of a University of Michigan - Wayne State University Institute of Labor and Industrial Relations project to document the early years of the United Automobile Workers union. All interviews contain releases.WPR 0538
Richard Frankensteen Oral HistoryConducted by Jack W. Skeels between 1959 and 1963 as part of a University of Michigan - Wayne State University Institute of Labor and Industrial Relations project to document the early years of the United Automobile Workers union. All interviews contain releases.WPR 0539
Lewis Michener Oral HistoryConducted by Jack W. Skeels between 1959 and 1963 as part of a University of Michigan - Wayne State University Institute of Labor and Industrial Relations project to document the early years of the United Automobile Workers union. All interviews contain releases.WPR 0540
Raymond Vess Oral HistoryConducted by Jack W. Skeels between 1959 and 1963 as part of a University of Michigan - Wayne State University Institute of Labor and Industrial Relations project to document the early years of the United Automobile Workers union. All interviews contain releases.WPR 0541
Elmer Freitag Oral HistoryConducted by Jack W. Skeels between 1959 and 1963 as part of a University of Michigan - Wayne State University Institute of Labor and Industrial Relations project to document the early years of the United Automobile Workers union. All interviews contain releases.WPR 0542
Paul Miley Oral HistoryConducted by Jack W. Skeels between 1959 and 1963 as part of a University of Michigan - Wayne State University Institute of Labor and Industrial Relations project to document the early years of the United Automobile Workers union. All interviews contain releases.WPR 0543
Frank Wallemann Oral HistoryIn a volume with Charles ConwayWPR 0544
Mort Furay Oral HistoryConducted by Jack W. Skeels between 1959 and 1963 as part of a University of Michigan - Wayne State University Institute of Labor and Industrial Relations project to document the early years of the United Automobile Workers union. All interviews contain releases.WPR 0545
Andrew Montgomery Oral HistoryConducted by Jack W. Skeels between 1959 and 1963 as part of a University of Michigan - Wayne State University Institute of Labor and Industrial Relations project to document the early years of the United Automobile Workers union. All interviews contain releases.WPR 0546
Nat Weinberg Oral HistoryConducted by Jack W. Skeels between 1959 and 1963 as part of a University of Michigan - Wayne State University Institute of Labor and Industrial Relations project to document the early years of the United Automobile Workers union. All interviews contain releases.WPR 0547
Daniel Gallagher Oral HistoryConducted by Jack W. Skeels between 1959 and 1963 as part of a University of Michigan - Wayne State University Institute of Labor and Industrial Relations project to document the early years of the United Automobile Workers union. All interviews contain releases.WPR 0548
Ken Morris Oral HistoryConducted by Jack W. Skeels between 1959 and 1963 as part of a University of Michigan - Wayne State University Institute of Labor and Industrial Relations project to document the early years of the United Automobile Workers union. All interviews contain releases.WPR 0549
Jack Wilse Oral HistoryConducted by Jack W. Skeels between 1959 and 1963 as part of a University of Michigan - Wayne State University Institute of Labor and Industrial Relations project to document the early years of the United Automobile Workers union. All interviews contain releases.WPR 0550
Nat Ganley Oral HistoryConducted by Jack W. Skeels between 1959 and 1963 as part of a University of Michigan - Wayne State University Institute of Labor and Industrial Relations project to document the early years of the United Automobile Workers union. All interviews contain releases.WPR 0551
Wyndham Mortimer Oral HistoryConducted by Jack W. Skeels between 1959 and 1963 as part of a University of Michigan - Wayne State University Institute of Labor and Industrial Relations project to document the early years of the United Automobile Workers union. All interviews contain releases.WPR 0552
Leonard Woodcock Oral HistoryConducted by Jack W. Skeels between 1959 and 1963 as part of a University of Michigan - Wayne State University Institute of Labor and Industrial Relations project to document the early years of the United Automobile Workers union. All interviews contain releases.WPR 0553
Catherine Gelles Oral HistoryConducted by Jack W. Skeels between 1959 and 1963 as part of a University of Michigan - Wayne State University Institute of Labor and Industrial Relations project to document the early years of the United Automobile Workers union. All interviews contain releases.WPR 0554
Stanley Nowak Oral HistoryConducted by Jack W. Skeels between 1959 and 1963 as part of a University of Michigan - Wayne State University Institute of Labor and Industrial Relations project to document the early years of the United Automobile Workers union. All interviews contain releases.WPR 0555
Charles Yaeger Oral HistoryConducted by Jack W. Skeels between 1959 and 1963 as part of a University of Michigan - Wayne State University Institute of Labor and Industrial Relations project to document the early years of the United Automobile Workers union. All interviews contain releases.WPR 0556
William Genske Oral HistoryConducted by Jack W. Skeels between 1959 and 1963 as part of a University of Michigan - Wayne State University Institute of Labor and Industrial Relations project to document the early years of the United Automobile Workers union. All interviews contain releases.WPR 0557
James Oddle Oral HistoryIn a volume with John K. McDanielWPR 0558
Charles Yenney Oral HistoryConducted by Jack W. Skeels between 1959 and 1963 as part of a University of Michigan - Wayne State University Institute of Labor and Industrial Relations project to document the early years of the United Automobile Workers union. All interviews contain releases.WPR 0559
Adolph F. Germer Oral HistoryConducted by Jack W. Skeels between 1959 and 1963 as part of a University of Michigan - Wayne State University Institute of Labor and Industrial Relations project to document the early years of the United Automobile Workers union. All interviews contain releases.WPR 0560
Clayton O’Donohue Oral HistoryIn a volume with John K. McDanielWPR 0561
Lawrence Yost Oral HistoryConducted by Jack W. Skeels between 1959 and 1963 as part of a University of Michigan - Wayne State University Institute of Labor and Industrial Relations project to document the early years of the United Automobile Workers union. All interviews contain releases.WPR 0562
Josephine Gomon Oral HistoryConducted by Jack W. Skeels between 1959 and 1963 as part of a University of Michigan - Wayne State University Institute of Labor and Industrial Relations project to document the early years of the United Automobile Workers union. All interviews contain releases.WPR 0563
Cyril O’Halloran Oral HistoryConducted by Jack W. Skeels between 1959 and 1963 as part of a University of Michigan - Wayne State University Institute of Labor and Industrial Relations project to document the early years of the United Automobile Workers union. All interviews contain releases.WPR 0564
John Zaremba Oral HistoryConducted by Jack W. Skeels between 1959 and 1963 as part of a University of Michigan - Wayne State University Institute of Labor and Industrial Relations project to document the early years of the United Automobile Workers union. All interviews contain releases.WPR 0565
Murvel Grant Oral HistoryIn a volume with John K. McDanielWPR 0566
William Oliver Oral HistoryConducted by Jack W. Skeels between 1959 and 1963 as part of a University of Michigan - Wayne State University Institute of Labor and Industrial Relations project to document the early years of the United Automobile Workers union. All interviews contain releases.WPR 0567
Pat Greathouse Oral HistoryConducted by Jack W. Skeels between 1959 and 1963 as part of a University of Michigan - Wayne State University Institute of Labor and Industrial Relations project to document the early years of the United Automobile Workers union. All interviews contain releases.WPR 0568
Patrick O’Malley Oral HistoryConducted by Jack W. Skeels between 1959 and 1963 as part of a University of Michigan - Wayne State University Institute of Labor and Industrial Relations project to document the early years of the United Automobile Workers union. All interviews contain releases.WPR 0569
James Couser Oral HistoryConducted by Jack W. Skeels between 1959 and 1963 as part of a University of Michigan - Wayne State University Institute of Labor and Industrial Relations project to document the early years of the United Automobile Workers union. All interviews contain releases.WPR 0570
John McGill Oral HistoryConducted by Jack W. Skeels between 1959 and 1963 as part of a University of Michigan - Wayne State University Institute of Labor and Industrial Relations project to document the early years of the United Automobile Workers union. All interviews contain releases.WPR 0571
Ken Bannon Oral HistoryA series of interviews conducted between 1985 and 1998 with eighteen IEB members covering their UAW careers and important events in the history of the union. Some interviews may contain correspondence and releases. UAW logo die from the bindery is presentWPR 0572
Raymond Berndt Oral HistoryA series of interviews conducted between 1985 and 1998 with eighteen IEB members covering their UAW careers and important events in the history of the union. Some interviews may contain correspondence and releases. UAW logo die from the bindery is presentWPR 0573
Owen Bieber Oral HistoryA series of interviews conducted between 1985 and 1998 with eighteen IEB members covering their UAW careers and important events in the history of the union. Some interviews may contain correspondence and releases. UAW logo die from the bindery is presentWPR 0574
Irving Bluestone Oral HistoryA series of interviews conducted between 1985 and 1998 with eighteen IEB members covering their UAW careers and important events in the history of the union. Some interviews may contain correspondence and releases. UAW logo die from the bindery is presentWPR 0575
George Burt Oral HistoryA series of interviews conducted between 1985 and 1998 with eighteen IEB members covering their UAW careers and important events in the history of the union. Some interviews may contain correspondence and releases. UAW logo die from the bindery is presentWPR 0576
Don Ellis Oral HistoryA series of interviews conducted between 1985 and 1998 with eighteen IEB members covering their UAW careers and important events in the history of the union. Some interviews may contain correspondence and releases. UAW logo die from the bindery is presentWPR 0577
Donald Ephlin Oral HistoryA series of interviews conducted between 1985 and 1998 with eighteen IEB members covering their UAW careers and important events in the history of the union. Some interviews may contain correspondence and releases. UAW logo die from the bindery is presentWPR 0578
Daniel Forchione Oral HistoryA series of interviews conducted between 1985 and 1998 with eighteen IEB members covering their UAW careers and important events in the history of the union. Some interviews may contain correspondence and releases. UAW logo die from the bindery is presentWPR 0579
Carolyn Forrest Oral HistoryA series of interviews conducted between 1985 and 1998 with eighteen IEB members covering their UAW careers and important events in the history of the union. Some interviews may contain correspondence and releases. UAW logo die from the bindery is presentWPR 0580
Douglas Fraser Oral HistoryA series of interviews conducted between 1985 and 1998 with eighteen IEB members covering their UAW careers and important events in the history of the union. Some interviews may contain correspondence and releases. UAW logo die from the bindery is presentWPR 0581
Martin Gerber Oral HistoryA series of interviews conducted between 1985 and 1998 with eighteen IEB members covering their UAW careers and important events in the history of the union. Some interviews may contain correspondence and releases. UAW logo die from the bindery is presentWPR 0582
Duane (Pat) Greathouse Oral HistoryA series of interviews conducted between 1985 and 1998 with eighteen IEB members covering their UAW careers and important events in the history of the union. Some interviews may contain correspondence and releases. UAW logo die from the bindery is presentWPR 0583
Olga Madar Oral HistoryA series of interviews conducted between 1985 and 1998 with eighteen IEB members covering their UAW careers and important events in the history of the union. Some interviews may contain correspondence and releases. UAW logo die from the bindery is presentWPR 0584
George Merrelli Oral HistoryA series of interviews conducted between 1985 and 1998 with eighteen IEB members covering their UAW careers and important events in the history of the union. Some interviews may contain correspondence and releases. UAW logo die from the bindery is presentWPR 0585
Ken Morris Oral HistoryA series of interviews conducted between 1985 and 1998 with eighteen IEB members covering their UAW careers and important events in the history of the union. Some interviews may contain correspondence and releases. UAW logo die from the bindery is presentWPR 0586
Marc Stepp Oral HistoryA series of interviews conducted between 1985 and 1998 with eighteen IEB members covering their UAW careers and important events in the history of the union. Some interviews may contain correspondence and releases. UAW logo die from the bindery is presentWPR 0587
Joe Tomasi Oral HistoryA series of interviews conducted between 1985 and 1998 with eighteen IEB members covering their UAW careers and important events in the history of the union. Some interviews may contain correspondence and releases. UAW logo die from the bindery is presentWPR 0588
Leonard Woodcock Oral HistoryA series of interviews conducted between 1985 and 1998 with eighteen IEB members covering their UAW careers and important events in the history of the union. Some interviews may contain correspondence and releases. UAW logo die from the bindery is presentWPR 0589
Nancy Allen Oral HistoryBox 1WPR 0590
Frank Angelo Oral HistoryBox 1WPR 0591
Catherine Carter Blackwell Oral HistoryOral history interview.WPR 0764
Kermit Bailer Oral HistoryBox 1WPR 0592
Sydney Barthwell Oral HistoryBox 1WPR 0593
Dave Bing Oral HistoryBox 1WPR 0594
Helen Nuttall Brown Oral HistoryBlackbotton. Box 1.WPR 0595
James Jenkins Oral HistoryBlackbotton. Box 1.WPR 0596
James Boggs Oral HistoryBox 1WPR 0597
Leon Bradley Oral HistoryBox 1WPR 0598
Gloria Hunter Oral HistoryBrewster Public Housing Project, Box 1.WPR 0599
Eleanor Manlove Oral HistoryBrewster Public Housing Project, Box 1.WPR 0600
Roy Brooks Oral HistoryBox 1WPR 0601
Beatrice Buck Oral HistoryBox 1WPR 0602
Waldo Cain Oral HistoryBox 1WPR 0603
Arthur Carter Oral HistoryCivil Rights, Box 1.WPR 0604
Ernest Goodman Oral HistoryCivil Rights, Box 1.WPR 0605
Alma Hall Oral HistoryCivil Rights, Box 1.WPR 0606
Richard Marks Oral HistoryCivil Rights, Box 1.WPR 0607
Jack White Oral HistoryCivil Rights, Box 1.WPR 0608
Mackie Johnson Oral HistoryBox 1. Crime.WPR 0609
Winston Lang Oral HistoryBox 1. Crime.WPR 0610
Mary McClendon Oral HistoryBox 1. Crime.WPR 0611
Frances Quock Oral HistoryBox 1. Crime.WPR 0612
Wardell Croft Oral HistoryBox 1WPR 0613
James Cummings Oral HistoryBox 1WPR 0614
Austin Curtis Oral HistoryBox 1WPR 0615
Ed Davis Oral HistoryBox 1WPR 0616
Jerrylee Johnson Oral HistoryBox 1, Delta Sigma Theta.WPR 0617
Cecil McFadden Oral HistoryBox 1, Delta Sigma Theta.WPR 0618
Roberta Pickett Oral HistoryBox 1, Delta Sigma Theta.WPR 0619
Carol Puryear Oral HistoryBox 1, Delta Sigma Theta.WPR 0620
Rose Swanson Oral HistoryBox 1, Delta Sigma Theta.WPR 0621
Charles Diggs Oral HistoryBox 1WPR 0622
Ernest Dillard Oral HistoryBox 1WPR 0623
Ofield Dukes Oral HistoryBox 1WPR 0624
William Billups Oral HistoryBox 1. Education.WPR 0625
Earlie Poole Oral HistoryBox 1. Education.WPR 0626
Walter Edwards Oral HistoryBox 1WPR 0627
Henry Biggs Oral HistoryBox 1. Employment.WPR 0628
Reginald Larrie Oral HistoryBox 1. Employment.WPR 0629
Lillian Duplessis Oral HistoryBox 1. Entertainment.WPR 0630
Ollie McFarland Oral HistoryBox 1. Entertainment.WPR 0631
M. Fritz Oral HistoryBox 1WPR 0632
Eleanor Jones Oral HistoryBox 2. Green Pastures Camp.WPR 0633
Ernest Marshall Oral HistoryBox 2. Green Pastures Camp.WPR 0634
Cecil McFadden Oral HistoryBox 2. Green Pastures Camp.WPR 0635
Fred Guinyard Oral HistoryBox 2.WPR 0636
Mary Cosey Oral HistoryBox 2. Hastings Street/Medical Center.WPR 0637
Fred Cureton Oral HistoryBox 2. Hastings Street/Medical Center.WPR 0638
Dorothy Lawson Oral HistoryBox 2. Hastings Street/Medical Center.WPR 0639
Earlie Poole Oral HistoryBox 2. Hastings Street/Medical Center.WPR 0640
Erma Henderson Oral HistoryBox 2.WPR 0641
William Hines Oral HistoryBox 2.WPR 0642
David Holmes Oral HistoryBox 2.WPR 0643
William Howard Oral HistoryBox 2.WPR 0644
William Hurt Oral HistoryBox 2.WPR 0645
Richard King Oral HistoryBox 2.WPR 0646
Francis Kornegay Oral HistoryBox 2.WPR 0647
Hildred Dale Oral HistoryBox 2. Labor Movement.WPR 0648
Gwendolyn Edwards Oral HistoryBox 2. Labor Movement.WPR 0649
Hodges Mason Oral HistoryBox 2. Labor Movement.WPR 0650
Stanley Nowak Oral HistoryBox 2. Labor Movement.WPR 0651
Jack white Oral HistoryBox 2. Labor Movement.WPR 0652
Oscar Lee Oral HistoryBox 2.WPR 0653
Wilfred Little Oral HistoryBox 2.WPR 0654
Nina Mack-Lester Oral HistoryBox 2.WPR 0655
Norman McRae Oral HistoryBox 2.WPR 0656
Ruth Clemons Oral HistoryBox 2. Metropolitan Baptist Church.WPR 0657
Lillian Edwards Oral HistoryBox 2. Metropolitan Baptist Church.WPR 0658
Elma Peddy Oral HistoryBox 2. Metropolitan Baptist Church.WPR 0659
Marsha Mickens Oral HistoryBox 2.WPR 0660
Harold Bowles Oral HistoryBox 2. Music I.WPR 0661
Earl Van Dyke Oral HistoryBox 2. Music I.WPR 0662
Wendell Harrison Oral HistoryBox 2. Music II.WPR 0663
Donald Walden Oral HistoryBox 2. Music II.WPR 0664
Alice Newman Oral HistoryBox 2.WPR 0665
Harold Norris Oral HistoryBox 2.WPR 0666
Mel Ravitz Oral HistoryBox 2.WPR 0667
Lamar Richardson Oral HistoryBox 2.WPR 0668
George Romney Oral HistoryBox 2.WPR 0669
Harry Boglin Oral HistoryBox 2. Sacred Heart Church.WPR 0670
Maryann Humphries Oral HistoryBox 2. Sacred Heart Church.WPR 0671
Emma Johnson Oral HistoryBox 2. Sacred Heart Church.WPR 0672
Anthony McCauley Oral HistoryBox 2. Sacred Heart Church.WPR 0673
Arthur Carter Oral HistoryBox 2. Second Baptist Church.WPR 0674
Nathaniel Leach Oral HistoryBox 2. Second Baptist Church.WPR 0675
Wilhelmina Means Oral HistoryBox 2. Second Baptist Church.WPR 0676
Katherine Reid Oral HistoryBox 2. Second Baptist Church.WPR 0677
Ernestine Wright Oral HistoryBox 2. Second Baptist Church.WPR 0678
Mary Harris Oral HistoryBox 2. Shiloh Baptist Church.WPR 0679
Marguerite McIntosh Oral HistoryBox 2. Shiloh Baptist Church.WPR 0680
Davene McKinney Oral HistoryBox 2. Shiloh Baptist Church.WPR 0681
Mary Ross Oral HistoryBox 2. Shiloh Baptist Church.WPR 0682
Paul Shirley Oral HistoryBox 2.WPR 0683
Gerald Smith Oral HistoryBox 2.WPR 0684
Gerald Blakely Oral HistoryBox 2. Sojourner Truth Homes.WPR 0685
Ken Booker Oral HistoryBox 2. Sojourner Truth Homes.WPR 0686
Robert Bynum Oral HistoryBox 2. Sojourner Truth Homes.WPR 0687
Thornton Jackson Oral HistoryBox 2. Sojourner Truth Homes.WPR 0688
Adam Shakoor Oral HistoryBox 2. Sojourner Truth Homes.WPR 0689
Lionel Swan Oral HistoryBox 2.WPR 0690
Shelton Tappes Oral HistoryBox 2.WPR 0691
Marcena Taylor Oral HistoryBox 2.WPR 0692
Bernard Odell Oral HistoryBox 2. Twelfth Street.WPR 0693
Odis Rencher Oral HistoryBox 2. Twelfth Street.WPR 0694
Ollie Foster Oral HistoryBox 2. Virginia Park.WPR 0695
Herschel Richey Oral HistoryBox 2. Virginia Park.WPR 0696
Walter Rosser Oral HistoryBox 2. Virginia Park.WPR 0697
Margaret Ward Oral HistoryBox 2.WPR 0698
Rosa Wheeler Oral HistoryBox 2.WPR 0699
Anne Williams Oral HistoryBox 2.WPR 0700
Carl Winter Oral HistoryBox 2.WPR 0701
Alexander Jefferson Oral HistoryBox 2. World War II.WPR 0702
Richard Macon Oral HistoryBox 2. World War II.WPR 0703
Ernestine Wright Oral HistoryBox 2.WPR 0704
W.M. “Jack” Anderson Oral HistoryInterview about Anderson’s experiences as the first president of UAW Local 645 in Dallas, TX.WPR 0705
Don Stevens Oral HistoryOral history interview.WPR 0762
Eugene Barnett Oral HistoryInterview about his involvement in the events at Centralia, Washington on Armistice Day, 1919. Supplementing the interview are William Friedland’s note on the provenance of the recording and Archie Green’s account of his 1961 interview with Barnett. Includes bibliography and chronology of Barnett's life.WPR 0706
Walter Bergman Oral HistoryInterview with Warner Plug chronicling his activities as a socialist and an educator in Detroit in the 1920’s and 1930’s, his work with UNRRA in Europe after World War II and his experiences as a Freedom Rider. Also contains correspondence and a release.WPR 0707
Irving Bluestone Oral HistoryInterview with Sidney Kelman relating to Bluestone’s association with Walter Reuther, the Reuther Caucus and issues confronting the UAW from the late 1930’s through the 1940’s. Also contains correspondence and a release.WPR 0708
Grace Boggs Oral HistoryInterview with L. Todd Duncan and Kathryne V. Lindberg about her and husband, James’s revolutionary activism in inner city Detroit and their role in constructing a “black Marxism.” Published in the Summer 2001 issue of Social Text.WPR 0709
Carl Brown Oral HistoryInterview with Howell Harris about the Foreman’s Association of America.WPR 0710
Valery Burati Oral HistoryInternational labor relations specialist’s interview with Philip P. Mason about his early life.WPR 0711
Larry Carlstrom Oral HistoryInterview with John Barnard about UAW organizing and collective bargaining in automobile and farm machinery plants in Wisconsin and Illinois, especially during the 1930’s and 1940’s. Release included.WPR 0712
Paul Cavanaugh Oral HistoryInterview conducted by Ray Borycka with the brother of Detroit mayor, Jerome P. Cavanagh. Also contains correspondence and a release.WPR 0713
Frank Cedervall Oral HistoryInterview with Pete Reagan about his experiences with the IWW.WPR 0714
Cesar Chavez Oral HistoryInterview conducted as part of the oral history program of the John F. Kennedy Presidential Library.WPR 0715
IWW Strike 1927 - Eyewitness InterviewsInterview with six eyewitnesses to the killing of striking IWW miners by guards at the Columbine Mine in Lafayette, Colorado on November 21, 1927, conducted as part of the University of Colorado’s Coal Project.WPR 0716
Jack T. Conway Oral HistoryJack Conway with Larry J. Hackman (John F. Kennedy Presidential Library), 1972.WPR 0718
Francis Dillon Oral HistoryInterview with Dennis East about William Green, AFL organizing in the auto industry and the UAW presidency.WPR 0720
Katherine Ellickson Oral HistoryInterview with Dennis East. Also contains a release.This interview is the second big installment of Ellickson's interviews with the Labor Archives.WPR 0723
Frank Ellis Oral HistoryInterview conducted by the Minnesota Historical Society recounting Ellis’s involvement with the IWW and Packinghouse Workers in Minnesota in the early part of the twentieth century. Also includes a release.WPR 0724
Frank Felt Oral HistoryInterview with Dennis East and Betty Chmaj about Finnish participation in the labor movement.WPR 0725
Richard Frankensteen Oral HistoryInterview with [?] Jones about the 1937 and 1945 Detroit elections.WPR 0726
Sonia Fuentes Oral HistoryInterview with EEOC counsel and early NOW member conducted by Dennis Deslippe for his book, “Rights, Not Roses”: Unions and the Rise of Working-Class Rights & democracy -- Feminism, 1945-80. Also includes a release.WPR 0727
Charles Gentile Oral HistoryInterview with Mike Smith about the Society of Design Engineers and UAW Local 412.WPR 0728
Ray Girardin Oral HistoryInterview with Maurice Kelman about his career as a crime reporter with The Detroit Times and as Detroit police commissioner during the 1967 riot.WPR 0729
Margaret Greenfield Oral HistoryInterview with Aldo Lanza about Brookwood Labor College.WPR 0730
Gloria Johnson Oral HistoryInterview with IUE staffer and CLUW president conducted by Dennis Deslippe for his book, “Rights, Not Roses”: Unions and the Rise of Working-Class Rights & democracy -- Feminism, 1945-80.WPR 0731
Jack Jourdan Oral HistoryInterview on the 1937 sit-down strike at Guide Lamp in Anderson, Indiana conducted by R. T. King as part of the Indiana University Oral History Project on the Indiana economy in the twentieth century.WPR 0732
Percy Llewellyn Oral HistoryThis interview takes place in two parts. Part one is an interview with George Heliker, in 1954. Part two with Dennis East about unionizing Ford Motor Company and the history of UAW Local 600. during the 1940’s and 1950’s.WPR 0733
Olga Madar Oral HistoryInterview with Joe Weaver and Wendy Robbins for (Detroit) TV2 special report on women’s rights.WPR 0735
Irene Young Marinovich Oral HistoryIndividual Oral History InterviewsWPR 0737
Blaine Marrin Oral HistoryReminiscences with an unidentified interviewer by the former president of UAW Local 157.WPR 0738
Wade McCree Oral HistoryInterview with Tara Tappert about his family and education prior to the beginning of his professional career in Detroit after World War II. Also includes correspondence.WPR 0739
Stoyan Menton Oral HistoryInterview with Warren Pflug about his association with the Socialist Party, his experiences as a radical student activist at Wayne State University in the 1930s and his work as education director of UAW Local 400 at Ford’s Highland park plant in the 1940s.WPR 0740
Wyndham Mortimer Oral HistoryInterview conducted as part of the Oral History Program, University of California, Los Angeles.WPR 0741
Dave Miller Oral HistoryInterview with Daniel Brooks about his career as president of UAW Local 22 and his role as leader of UAW retired workers.WPR 0742
Karen Nussbaum Oral HistoryInterview with Kathleen Banks Nutter focusing especially on her role as a co-founder of 9to5 and her work on behalf of working women.WPR 0743
Carrie Overton Oral HistoryInterview conducted by Philip P. Mason with NAACP and Democratic Party Colored Division secretary abour her early life.WPR 0744
Rosa Parks Oral HistoryInterview conducted as part of the Black Women Oral History Project at the Schlesinger Library, Radcliffe.WPR 0745
Philip Raymond Oral HistoryInterview with Shelton Tappes about his work organizing for the United Automobile, Aircraft and Vehicle Workers of America and the UAW.WPR 0746
Roy Reuther Oral HistoryInterview with Sidney Fine about the 1936-1937 Flint Sit-down strike.WPR 0747
Victor Reuther Oral HistoryInterview with Ida Burati about Jay Lovestone, George Meany and the ICFTU.WPR 0749
Irving Richter Oral HistoryConversation with unidentified interviewer about his career in the labor movement.WPR 0750
Meta Riseman Oral HistoryInterview with Patricia Painter about her activities with the Women’s International League for Peace and Freedom. Also includes a release.WPR 0751
Carl Salo Oral HistoryInterview with Betty Chmaj about Finnish participation in the labor movement.WPR 0752
Paul Schrade Oral HistoryInterview about his career with the UAW and his involvement with the United Farm Workers, Robert Kennedy’s presidential campaign and the antiwar and civil rights movements.WPR 0753
Ted Silvey Oral HistoryInterview about his career as a speaker and writer with the Ohio CIO Council and the national CIO.WPR 0754
Hilda Smith and Frank Fernbach Oral HistoryInterview of chair and co-chair of the National Committee for the Extension of Labor Education touching primarily on the Committee’s efforts in the late 1940’s to get federal legislation passed to establish a labor education service.WPR 0755
Thomas Starling Oral HistoryInterview with George Tselos about the organization of UAW Local 34 at the GM Fisher Body plant in Atlanta, Georgia in the 1930’s.WPR 0756
Mark and Helen Norton Starr Oral HistoryInterview with Dennis East about their experiences at Brookwood Labor College and related events.Final portion of the interview is missing.WPR 0757
Joseph Sullivan Oral HistoryInterview with Raymond Borycka about the election and administration of Detroit mayor, Jerome P. Cavanagh.WPR 0758
Fred Thompson Oral HistoryInterview recounts Thompson’s activities with the Work Peoples’ College.WPR 0759
Robert E. Treuhaft Oral HistoryConsumers Cooperative of Berkeley Oral History Collection.WPR 0760
Charleszetta Waddles Oral HistoryInterview conducted as part of the Black Women Oral History Project at the Schlesinger Library, Radcliffe.WPR 0761
Katherine Ellickson Oral HistoryInterview with Peter Corning about Social Security.This memoir is the result of a series of tape-recorded interviews conducted for the Oral History Research Office by Peter Corning with Ellickson in 1966 and 1967.WPR 0721
Katherine Ellickson Oral HistoryInterview with Katherine Pollak Ellickson. In this interview Ellickson explains the inventory of the papers that she gave to the University.WPR 0722
Olga Madar Oral HistoryInterview with Silke Roth about the Coalition of labor Union Women.WPR 0734
Irene Young Marinovich Oral HistoryInterview with Sue Hartmann about the UAW and conditions for women workers in Detroit-area auto plants during the 1930’s and 1940’s.WPR 0736
Victor Reuther Oral HistoryInterview about UAW organizing activity in Indiana in 1937 conducted by R.T. King as part of the Indiana University Oral History Project on the Indiana economy in the twentieth century.WPR 0748
William Angus Oral HistoryThe papers of William Robertson Angus, Jr., missionary to China and the Philippines; Rutgers University Class of 1922; Hartford Seminary Class of 1925; graduate work at Yale University; licensed by the Classis of Bergen, 1925; commissioned by the RCA board of Foreign Missions, 1925; Amoy Mission service, 1925-1952; Honorary Doctorate in Divinity, Rutgers, 1947; recommissioned and sent to the Philippines as missionary, 1952-1967HC 0001
Sylvia Banks (Brown) Oral HistoryThe collection contains her 2003 oral history recording and transcript concerning her family’s move to the area from Chicago in 1943 to farm, her grandparents Leonard Foster and Gladys Leone Stoutmire, a cross burning incident, prejudice at the Harlem School, and the Full Gospel All-Nation Pentecostal Church. (B)HC 0002
Grace Bowden Oral HistoryChicago area African-American family that located to the West Olive area in 1956 to raise blueberries, black angus cattle, and eventually open a service station on Butternut Drive.HC 0003
Dorothy Busscher (Fisher) Oral HistoryFormer employee of the Chris-Craft Corporation, Holland Furniture, Modern Partions, Uniline of Grand Rapids, and founder of Trendway in 1968HC 0004
Robert Chambers Oral HistoryCommercial fishing family located in Holland, Michigan and Western shore of WisconsinHC 0005
Hilda Curtis (Hansen) Oral HistoryFormer resident of the North Side of Holland, MichiganHC 0006
Dave Fetters Oral HistoryGraduate of Holland High School and local Holland Vietnam Conflict veteran. Served with the U.S. Army Fifth Special Forces (Green Berets), Third Corps, as a 1st Lt., 1967-1969.HC 0007
Elly Hes Oral HistoryOral history interview conducted by Melissa LeBarge and Irene van der Lugt with post World War Two Dutch immigrant Elly W. Hess about her experiences working in the Dutch Underground in Amsterdam and FranceHC 0008
Bernard Meiste Oral HistoryWorked with Jason Petroelje of Skipper-Craft Boats to build his own 15-foot Skipper-Craft boat in 1959.HC 0009
Margaret Murphy Oral HistoryPhotographic slide images of the Ottawa Beach area including the Ottawa Beach Hotel, the Murphy family (caretaker of the hotel, boat builder, and livery operator), railroad, and western Black Lake scenes, and oral history transcript and tape recorded in 2003 concerning the Ottawa Beach Hotel and resort area as well as her father’s role as caretaker of the hotel and livery boat operator.HC 0010
Metta Ross Oral HistoryThis collection contains two oral history interviews conducted by Matthew Nickel concerning Ross with Dick and Phyllis Huff on March 15, 2002, and Paul Fried April 1, 2002. Subjects areas are: Hope College class of 1926; Hope College professor of History and English (1926–1960); founder of “Palette and Masque” drama club (forerunner to the Theatre department), and the International Relations Club; awarded a bronze medal by Queen Juliana of the Netherlands for donations and letter writing efforts during World War II; correspondence, history project on Drummond IslandHC 0011
Ethel Sincock Oral HistoryWidow of Eldred Sincock, longtime employee and foreman for the Campbell Boat Company (1937-1953), owned and operated by Kenneth Campbell (1905-1954) on South Shore DriveHC 0012
James Wetherbee Oral HistoryCampbell Boat Company (1937-1953), owned and operated by Kenneth Campbell (1905-1954) on South Shore DriveHC 0013
Robert Bennett Oral HistoryCampbell Boat Company (1937-1953), owned and operated by Kenneth Campbell (1905-1954) on South Shore DriveHC 0014
Rachel Vander Werf (Good) Oral HistoryWife of former Hope College President Calvin A. Vander Werf and organizer of the Hope College chapter of Phi Beta KappaHC 0015
Larry Wagenaar Oral HistoryCollection includes an oral history by Larry Wagenaar with Gerald R. Ford in April 1988. Hope College class of 1987; Director of the Joint Archives of Holland, 1988-2001HC 0016
Leona Westerhoff Oral HistoryFormer employee of the Chris-Craft Corporation Roamer Steel Boat Division and Chris-Craft Corporation Holland plant in the upholstery departmentHC 0017
Rebecca Wineserich Oral HistoryFormer Hope College student (class of 2003) and summer employee in the Kinesiology Department as a trainer from 2001-2003HC 0018
Fay Volkers Oral HistoryFay Volkers is a former waitress of Boone's City Kitchen/Veurink's City Kitchen. Originally founded in the 1946 by Clarence C. Boone at 68 E. 8th Street in Holland and later purchased from Boone's survivors and co-owner Frank Moser by Gordon VeurinkHC 0019
Gordon Veurink Oral HistoryFormer cook and owner of Boone's City Kitchen/Veurink's City Kitchen. Originally founded in the 1946 by Clarence C. Boone at 68 E. 8th Street in Holland and later purchased from Boone's survivors and co-owner Frank Moser by Gordon Veurink.HC 0020
Yvonne Love Oral HistoryA former owner of the Lovecraft Boat Company, a small boat manufacturer once located at 642 West 48th Street, Holland, Michigan (Graafschap) and owned by Dave and Yvonne Love during the early 1970s, and Forest and Russell Homkes after the Love family sold the company. The Homkes family produced the boats at 961 Washington Avenue for a short time. The company made small catamaran paddle boats powered by four cycle Briggs & Stratton engines and foot powered called Puppy Love Pedal Boat and outboard motor powered Puppy Love Pontoon BoatHC 0021
Forest Homes Oral HistoryAn owner of Lovecraft Boat Company, a small boat manufacturer once located at 642 West 48th Street, Holland, Michigan (Graafschap) and owned by Dave and Yvonne Love during the early 1970s, and Forest and Russell Homkes after the Love family sold the company. The Homkes family produced the boats at 961 Washington Avenue for a short time. The company made small catamaran paddle boats powered by four cycle Briggs & Stratton engines and foot powered called Puppy Love Pedal Boat and outboard motor powered Puppy Love Pontoon BoatHC 0022
Interviews with Retiring Professors VanZyl, Borgh, and TimmerCollection includes: Hope College history radio broadcast with William VanderLugt interviewing retiring professors Dr. Gerrit VanZyl, Garrett Vander Borgh, and Al Timmer. Original reel-to-reel tape is located in H88-0200 Wichers, Wynand (1886-1971).HC 0023
Clarence Thomas De Graaf Oral HistorySome records available.HC 0024
Clarence Kleis Oral HistorySome records available.HC 0025
Irwin Lubbers Oral HistorySome records available.HC 0026
Metta Ross Oral HistorySome records available.HC 0027
William Hillegonds Oral HistoryConrad Strauch (student) with retired faculty and administrators of Hope College Records & Correspondence concerning the project and its continuation.HC 0028
John Hollenbach Oral HistoryConrad Strauch (student) with retired faculty and administrators of Hope College Records & Correspondence concerning the project and its continuation.HC 0029
Lambert Ponstein Oral HistoryConrad Strauch (student) with retired faculty and administrators of Hope College Records & Correspondence concerning the project and its continuation.HC 0030
Henry Steffens Oral HistoryConrad Strauch (student) with retired faculty and administrators of Hope College Records & Correspondence concerning the project and its continuation.HC 0031
Marian Stryker Oral HistoryConrad Strauch (student) with retired faculty and administrators of Hope College Records & Correspondence concerning the project and its continuation.HC 0032
John Ver Beek Oral HistoryConrad Strauch (student) with retired faculty and administrators of Hope College Records & Correspondence concerning the project and its continuation.HC 0033
Edward Wolters Oral HistoryConrad Strauch (student) with retired faculty and administrators of Hope College Records & Correspondence concerning the project and its continuation.HC 0034
Marion de Velder Oral HistoryDerk M. Strauch (student) with former RCA executive.HC 0035
Bernard Mulder Oral HistoryDerk M. Strauch (student) with former RCA executive.HC 0036
Christian Walvoord Oral HistoryDerk M. Strauch (student) with former RCA executive.HC 0037
Homer Hoeksema Oral HistoryDerk M. Strauch (student) with Homer Hoeksema of the Protestant Reformed Churches.HC 0038
Rebecca Rivera Oral HistoryCarol Bechtel (student) with local women.HC 0039
Margaret Wylen Oral HistoryCarol Bechtel (student) with local women.HC 0040
Ruth Keppel Oral HistoryCarol Bechtel (student) with local women.HC 0041
Jantina Holleman Oral HistoryCarol Bechtel (student) with local women.HC 0042
James Cook Oral HistoryCarol Bechtel with theologians of Hope College and Western Seminary.HC 0043
Lester Kuyper Oral HistoryCarol Bechtel with theologians of Hope College and Western Seminary.HC 0044
Eugene Osterhaven Oral HistoryCarol Bechtel with theologians of Hope College and Western Seminary.HC 0045
Richard Oudersluys Oral HistoryCarol Bechtel with theologians of Hope College and Western Seminary.HC 0046
Henry Voogd Oral HistoryCarol Bechtel with theologians of Hope College and Western Seminary.HC 0047
D.J. Pree Oral HistoryLocal business people of Holland, MI.HC 0048
John Donnelly Oral HistoryLocal business people of Holland, MI.HC 0049
Cornelia Van Voorst Oral HistoryLocal business people of Holland, MI.HC 0050
Charles Sligh Oral HistoryLocal business person of Holland, MI.HC 0051
Elmer Scheppers Oral HistoryFormer mayor of Holland, MI.HC 0052
John De Pree Oral History Oral HistoryFormer mayor of Holland, MI.HC 0053
Robert Visscher Oral HistoryFormer mayor of Holland, MI.HC 0054
Nelson Bosman Oral HistoryFormer mayor of Holland, MI.HC 0055
Lawrence Lamb Oral HistoryFormer mayor of Holland, MI.HC 0056
Louis Hallacy Oral HistoryFormer mayor of Holland, MI.HC 0057
Willard Wichers Oral HistoryFormer mayor of Holland, MI.HC 0058
Richard Smith Oral HistoryFormer mayor of Holland, MI.HC 0059
Edgar Prince Oral HistoryEdgar Prince and his daughter Emilie (Prince) Wierda Evergreen Commons (senior citizens center) of Holland, MI.HC 0060
Eleanor (DePree) Van Haitsma Oral HistoryEleanor (DePree) Van Haitsma, art professor at Hope College, 1950-1957, Holland, MI.HC 0061
Harvey Buter Oral HistoryHarvey Buter, a citizen of Holland, MI, who served on city committees and boards.HC 0062
Vern Boersma Oral HistoryHolland Furnace Company.HC 0063
Nelson Bosman Oral HistoryHolland Furnace Company.HC 0064
Florence Bradford Oral HistoryHolland Furnace Company.HC 0065
Stanley "Doc" Curtis Oral HistoryHolland Furnace Company.HC 0066
William DeLong Oral HistoryHolland Furnace Company.HC 0067
Wayne Fitzgerald Oral HistoryHolland Furnace Company.HC 0068
Clyde Geerlings Oral HistoryHolland Furnace Company.HC 0069
Al Klomparens Oral HistoryHolland Furnace Company.HC 0070
Ruth Keppel Oral HistoryHolland Furnace Company.HC 0071
Katherine Peebles Oral HistoryHolland Furnace Company.HC 0072
Larry Kolb Oral HistoryHolland Furnace Company.HC 0073
Donna Topp Oral HistoryHolland Furnace Company.HC 0074
Herb Marsilje Oral HistoryHolland Furnace Company.HC 0075
Howard Plaggemars Oral HistoryHolland Furnace Company.HC 0076
Jerry Roper Oral HistoryHolland Furnace Company.HC 0077
Vern Schipper Oral HistoryHolland Furnace Company.HC 0078
William Sikkel Oral HistoryHolland Furnace Company.HC 0079
Jay Tinholt Oral HistoryHolland Furnace Company.HC 0080
Bruce Leuwen Oral HistoryHolland Furnace Company.HC 0081
Jay Wabeke Oral HistoryHolland Furnace Company.HC 0082
Geraldine Walvoord Oral HistoryHolland Furnace Company.HC 0083
Henry Weyenberg Oral HistoryHolland Furnace Company.HC 0084
Willard Wichers Oral HistoryHolland Furnace Company.HC 0085
Irwin Brink Oral HistoryScience professor at Hope College, chemistry.HC 0086
Herbert Dershem Oral HistoryScience professor at Hope College, computer science.HC 0087
Eugene Jekel Oral HistoryScience professor at Hope College, chemistry.HC 0088
Frank Quiring Oral HistoryScience professor at Hope College, chemistry summer institute.HC 0089
Charles Steketee Oral HistoryScience professor at Hope College, mathematics and science.HC 0090
James Tharin Oral HistoryScience professor at Hope College, geology.HC 0091
Paul Van Faasen Oral HistoryScience professor at Hope College, biology.HC 0092
James Neckers Oral HistoryScience professor at Hope College, Impromptu interview.HC 0093
Doug Neckers Oral HistoryRemarks on chemistry department history.HC 0094
Jay Folkert Oral HistoryMathematics.HC 0095
Harry Frissel Oral HistoryChemistry.HC 0096
Elton Achterhof Oral HistorySpecial Project 150 Stories for 150 Years. Several different interviewers, including staff and volunteers of the Joint Archives of Holland, with 170 different interviewees about their impressions of Holland, Michigan. Tracy Bednarick (1996) and Ann Paeth (1997) were the Summer Semester Student Coordinators. Interviews were transcribed through summer 1998. Also includes a paper written on the history of Holland for the past fifty years by Tracy Bednarick.HC 0097
Grace Antoon Oral HistorySpecial Project 150 Stories for 150 Years. Several different interviewers, including staff and volunteers of the Joint Archives of Holland, with 170 different interviewees about their impressions of Holland, Michigan. Tracy Bednarick (1996) and Ann Paeth (1997) were the Summer Semester Student Coordinators. Interviews were transcribed through summer 1998. Also includes a paper written on the history of Holland for the past fifty years by Tracy Bednarick.HC 0098
Carl Apple Oral HistorySpecial Project 150 Stories for 150 Years. Several different interviewers, including staff and volunteers of the Joint Archives of Holland, with 170 different interviewees about their impressions of Holland, Michigan. Tracy Bednarick (1996) and Ann Paeth (1997) were the Summer Semester Student Coordinators. Interviews were transcribed through summer 1998. Also includes a paper written on the history of Holland for the past fifty years by Tracy Bednarick.HC 0099
Sue Baker Oral HistorySpecial Project 150 Stories for 150 Years. Several different interviewers, including staff and volunteers of the Joint Archives of Holland, with 170 different interviewees about their impressions of Holland, Michigan. Tracy Bednarick (1996) and Ann Paeth (1997) were the Summer Semester Student Coordinators. Interviews were transcribed through summer 1998. Also includes a paper written on the history of Holland for the past fifty years by Tracy Bednarick.HC 0100
John Benson Oral HistorySpecial Project 150 Stories for 150 Years. Several different interviewers, including staff and volunteers of the Joint Archives of Holland, with 170 different interviewees about their impressions of Holland, Michigan. Tracy Bednarick (1996) and Ann Paeth (1997) were the Summer Semester Student Coordinators. Interviews were transcribed through summer 1998. Also includes a paper written on the history of Holland for the past fifty years by Tracy Bednarick.HC 0101
Myra Berry Oral HistorySpecial Project 150 Stories for 150 Years. Several different interviewers, including staff and volunteers of the Joint Archives of Holland, with 170 different interviewees about their impressions of Holland, Michigan. Tracy Bednarick (1996) and Ann Paeth (1997) were the Summer Semester Student Coordinators. Interviews were transcribed through summer 1998. Also includes a paper written on the history of Holland for the past fifty years by Tracy Bednarick.HC 0102
Nathan Bocks Oral HistorySpecial Project 150 Stories for 150 Years. Several different interviewers, including staff and volunteers of the Joint Archives of Holland, with 170 different interviewees about their impressions of Holland, Michigan. Tracy Bednarick (1996) and Ann Paeth (1997) were the Summer Semester Student Coordinators. Interviews were transcribed through summer 1998. Also includes a paper written on the history of Holland for the past fifty years by Tracy Bednarick.HC 0103
William Boer Oral HistorySpecial Project 150 Stories for 150 Years. Several different interviewers, including staff and volunteers of the Joint Archives of Holland, with 170 different interviewees about their impressions of Holland, Michigan. Tracy Bednarick (1996) and Ann Paeth (1997) were the Summer Semester Student Coordinators. Interviews were transcribed through summer 1998. Also includes a paper written on the history of Holland for the past fifty years by Tracy Bednarick.HC 0104
Vern Boersma Oral HistorySpecial Project 150 Stories for 150 Years. Several different interviewers, including staff and volunteers of the Joint Archives of Holland, with 170 different interviewees about their impressions of Holland, Michigan. Tracy Bednarick (1996) and Ann Paeth (1997) were the Summer Semester Student Coordinators. Interviews were transcribed through summer 1998. Also includes a paper written on the history of Holland for the past fifty years by Tracy Bednarick.HC 0105
Al Bonzelaar Oral HistorySpecial Project 150 Stories for 150 Years. Several different interviewers, including staff and volunteers of the Joint Archives of Holland, with 170 different interviewees about their impressions of Holland, Michigan. Tracy Bednarick (1996) and Ann Paeth (1997) were the Summer Semester Student Coordinators. Interviews were transcribed through summer 1998. Also includes a paper written on the history of Holland for the past fifty years by Tracy Bednarick.HC 0106
Clyde and Kathleen Borgman Oral HistorySpecial Project 150 Stories for 150 Years. Several different interviewers, including staff and volunteers of the Joint Archives of Holland, with 170 different interviewees about their impressions of Holland, Michigan. Tracy Bednarick (1996) and Ann Paeth (1997) were the Summer Semester Student Coordinators. Interviews were transcribed through summer 1998. Also includes a paper written on the history of Holland for the past fifty years by Tracy Bednarick.HC 0107
Deb Bos Oral HistorySpecial Project 150 Stories for 150 Years. Several different interviewers, including staff and volunteers of the Joint Archives of Holland, with 170 different interviewees about their impressions of Holland, Michigan. Tracy Bednarick (1996) and Ann Paeth (1997) were the Summer Semester Student Coordinators. Interviews were transcribed through summer 1998. Also includes a paper written on the history of Holland for the past fifty years by Tracy Bednarick.HC 0108
Bryan Bouws Oral HistorySpecial Project 150 Stories for 150 Years. Several different interviewers, including staff and volunteers of the Joint Archives of Holland, with 170 different interviewees about their impressions of Holland, Michigan. Tracy Bednarick (1996) and Ann Paeth (1997) were the Summer Semester Student Coordinators. Interviews were transcribed through summer 1998. Also includes a paper written on the history of Holland for the past fifty years by Tracy Bednarick.HC 0109
Catherine Bradford Oral HistorySpecial Project 150 Stories for 150 Years. Several different interviewers, including staff and volunteers of the Joint Archives of Holland, with 170 different interviewees about their impressions of Holland, Michigan. Tracy Bednarick (1996) and Ann Paeth (1997) were the Summer Semester Student Coordinators. Interviews were transcribed through summer 1998. Also includes a paper written on the history of Holland for the past fifty years by Tracy Bednarick.HC 0110
Janie Briones Oral HistorySpecial Project 150 Stories for 150 Years. Several different interviewers, including staff and volunteers of the Joint Archives of Holland, with 170 different interviewees about their impressions of Holland, Michigan. Tracy Bednarick (1996) and Ann Paeth (1997) were the Summer Semester Student Coordinators. Interviews were transcribed through summer 1998. Also includes a paper written on the history of Holland for the past fifty years by Tracy Bednarick.HC 0111
Phyllis and Harley Brown Oral HistorySpecial Project 150 Stories for 150 Years. Several different interviewers, including staff and volunteers of the Joint Archives of Holland, with 170 different interviewees about their impressions of Holland, Michigan. Tracy Bednarick (1996) and Ann Paeth (1997) were the Summer Semester Student Coordinators. Interviews were transcribed through summer 1998. Also includes a paper written on the history of Holland for the past fifty years by Tracy Bednarick.HC 0112
Donald Bruggink Oral HistorySpecial Project 150 Stories for 150 Years. Several different interviewers, including staff and volunteers of the Joint Archives of Holland, with 170 different interviewees about their impressions of Holland, Michigan. Tracy Bednarick (1996) and Ann Paeth (1997) were the Summer Semester Student Coordinators. Interviews were transcribed through summer 1998. Also includes a paper written on the history of Holland for the past fifty years by Tracy Bednarick.HC 0113
Lieng Van Bui Oral HistorySpecial Project 150 Stories for 150 Years. Several different interviewers, including staff and volunteers of the Joint Archives of Holland, with 170 different interviewees about their impressions of Holland, Michigan. Tracy Bednarick (1996) and Ann Paeth (1997) were the Summer Semester Student Coordinators. Interviews were transcribed through summer 1998. Also includes a paper written on the history of Holland for the past fifty years by Tracy Bednarick.HC 0114
Harvey Buter Oral HistorySpecial Project 150 Stories for 150 Years. Several different interviewers, including staff and volunteers of the Joint Archives of Holland, with 170 different interviewees about their impressions of Holland, Michigan. Tracy Bednarick (1996) and Ann Paeth (1997) were the Summer Semester Student Coordinators. Interviews were transcribed through summer 1998. Also includes a paper written on the history of Holland for the past fifty years by Tracy Bednarick.HC 0115
Ekdal and Hermina Buys Oral HistorySpecial Project 150 Stories for 150 Years. Several different interviewers, including staff and volunteers of the Joint Archives of Holland, with 170 different interviewees about their impressions of Holland, Michigan. Tracy Bednarick (1996) and Ann Paeth (1997) were the Summer Semester Student Coordinators. Interviews were transcribed through summer 1998. Also includes a paper written on the history of Holland for the past fifty years by Tracy Bednarick.HC 0116
Ernesto Cantu Oral HistorySpecial Project 150 Stories for 150 Years. Several different interviewers, including staff and volunteers of the Joint Archives of Holland, with 170 different interviewees about their impressions of Holland, Michigan. Tracy Bednarick (1996) and Ann Paeth (1997) were the Summer Semester Student Coordinators. Interviews were transcribed through summer 1998. Also includes a paper written on the history of Holland for the past fifty years by Tracy Bednarick.HC 0117
Thongwan Champassak Oral HistorySpecial Project 150 Stories for 150 Years. Several different interviewers, including staff and volunteers of the Joint Archives of Holland, with 170 different interviewees about their impressions of Holland, Michigan. Tracy Bednarick (1996) and Ann Paeth (1997) were the Summer Semester Student Coordinators. Interviews were transcribed through summer 1998. Also includes a paper written on the history of Holland for the past fifty years by Tracy Bednarick.HC 0118
Savas Chavez Oral HistorySpecial Project 150 Stories for 150 Years. Several different interviewers, including staff and volunteers of the Joint Archives of Holland, with 170 different interviewees about their impressions of Holland, Michigan. Tracy Bednarick (1996) and Ann Paeth (1997) were the Summer Semester Student Coordinators. Interviews were transcribed through summer 1998. Also includes a paper written on the history of Holland for the past fifty years by Tracy Bednarick.HC 0119
Charles Cooper Oral HistorySpecial Project 150 Stories for 150 Years. Several different interviewers, including staff and volunteers of the Joint Archives of Holland, with 170 different interviewees about their impressions of Holland, Michigan. Tracy Bednarick (1996) and Ann Paeth (1997) were the Summer Semester Student Coordinators. Interviews were transcribed through summer 1998. Also includes a paper written on the history of Holland for the past fifty years by Tracy Bednarick.HC 0120
Gladys Cortes Oral HistorySpecial Project 150 Stories for 150 Years. Several different interviewers, including staff and volunteers of the Joint Archives of Holland, with 170 different interviewees about their impressions of Holland, Michigan. Tracy Bednarick (1996) and Ann Paeth (1997) were the Summer Semester Student Coordinators. Interviews were transcribed through summer 1998. Also includes a paper written on the history of Holland for the past fifty years by Tracy Bednarick.HC 0121
Jerry Counihan Oral HistorySpecial Project 150 Stories for 150 Years. Several different interviewers, including staff and volunteers of the Joint Archives of Holland, with 170 different interviewees about their impressions of Holland, Michigan. Tracy Bednarick (1996) and Ann Paeth (1997) were the Summer Semester Student Coordinators. Interviews were transcribed through summer 1998. Also includes a paper written on the history of Holland for the past fifty years by Tracy Bednarick.HC 0122
Jessie Dalman Oral HistorySpecial Project 150 Stories for 150 Years. Several different interviewers, including staff and volunteers of the Joint Archives of Holland, with 170 different interviewees about their impressions of Holland, Michigan. Tracy Bednarick (1996) and Ann Paeth (1997) were the Summer Semester Student Coordinators. Interviews were transcribed through summer 1998. Also includes a paper written on the history of Holland for the past fifty years by Tracy Bednarick.HC 0123
Laverne Dalman Oral HistorySpecial Project 150 Stories for 150 Years. Several different interviewers, including staff and volunteers of the Joint Archives of Holland, with 170 different interviewees about their impressions of Holland, Michigan. Tracy Bednarick (1996) and Ann Paeth (1997) were the Summer Semester Student Coordinators. Interviews were transcribed through summer 1998. Also includes a paper written on the history of Holland for the past fifty years by Tracy Bednarick.HC 0124
Lillian Dalman Oral HistorySpecial Project 150 Stories for 150 Years. Several different interviewers, including staff and volunteers of the Joint Archives of Holland, with 170 different interviewees about their impressions of Holland, Michigan. Tracy Bednarick (1996) and Ann Paeth (1997) were the Summer Semester Student Coordinators. Interviews were transcribed through summer 1998. Also includes a paper written on the history of Holland for the past fifty years by Tracy Bednarick.HC 0125
Ed Damson Oral HistorySpecial Project 150 Stories for 150 Years. Several different interviewers, including staff and volunteers of the Joint Archives of Holland, with 170 different interviewees about their impressions of Holland, Michigan. Tracy Bednarick (1996) and Ann Paeth (1997) were the Summer Semester Student Coordinators. Interviews were transcribed through summer 1998. Also includes a paper written on the history of Holland for the past fifty years by Tracy Bednarick.HC 0126
Annie Dandavati Oral HistorySpecial Project 150 Stories for 150 Years. Several different interviewers, including staff and volunteers of the Joint Archives of Holland, with 170 different interviewees about their impressions of Holland, Michigan. Tracy Bednarick (1996) and Ann Paeth (1997) were the Summer Semester Student Coordinators. Interviews were transcribed through summer 1998. Also includes a paper written on the history of Holland for the past fifty years by Tracy Bednarick.HC 0127
Peg De Haan Oral HistorySpecial Project 150 Stories for 150 Years. Several different interviewers, including staff and volunteers of the Joint Archives of Holland, with 170 different interviewees about their impressions of Holland, Michigan. Tracy Bednarick (1996) and Ann Paeth (1997) were the Summer Semester Student Coordinators. Interviews were transcribed through summer 1998. Also includes a paper written on the history of Holland for the past fifty years by Tracy Bednarick.HC 0128
Bill De Long Oral HistorySpecial Project 150 Stories for 150 Years. Several different interviewers, including staff and volunteers of the Joint Archives of Holland, with 170 different interviewees about their impressions of Holland, Michigan. Tracy Bednarick (1996) and Ann Paeth (1997) were the Summer Semester Student Coordinators. Interviews were transcribed through summer 1998. Also includes a paper written on the history of Holland for the past fifty years by Tracy Bednarick.HC 0129
Max De Pree Oral HistorySpecial Project 150 Stories for 150 Years. Several different interviewers, including staff and volunteers of the Joint Archives of Holland, with 170 different interviewees about their impressions of Holland, Michigan. Tracy Bednarick (1996) and Ann Paeth (1997) were the Summer Semester Student Coordinators. Interviews were transcribed through summer 1998. Also includes a paper written on the history of Holland for the past fifty years by Tracy Bednarick.HC 0130
Marion de Velder Oral HistorySpecial Project 150 Stories for 150 Years. Several different interviewers, including staff and volunteers of the Joint Archives of Holland, with 170 different interviewees about their impressions of Holland, Michigan. Tracy Bednarick (1996) and Ann Paeth (1997) were the Summer Semester Student Coordinators. Interviews were transcribed through summer 1998. Also includes a paper written on the history of Holland for the past fifty years by Tracy Bednarick.HC 0131
Michael De Vries Oral HistorySpecial Project 150 Stories for 150 Years. Several different interviewers, including staff and volunteers of the Joint Archives of Holland, with 170 different interviewees about their impressions of Holland, Michigan. Tracy Bednarick (1996) and Ann Paeth (1997) were the Summer Semester Student Coordinators. Interviews were transcribed through summer 1998. Also includes a paper written on the history of Holland for the past fifty years by Tracy Bednarick.HC 0132
Herm De Weerd Oral HistorySpecial Project 150 Stories for 150 Years. Several different interviewers, including staff and volunteers of the Joint Archives of Holland, with 170 different interviewees about their impressions of Holland, Michigan. Tracy Bednarick (1996) and Ann Paeth (1997) were the Summer Semester Student Coordinators. Interviews were transcribed through summer 1998. Also includes a paper written on the history of Holland for the past fifty years by Tracy Bednarick.HC 0133
Ruth Dirkse Oral HistorySpecial Project 150 Stories for 150 Years. Several different interviewers, including staff and volunteers of the Joint Archives of Holland, with 170 different interviewees about their impressions of Holland, Michigan. Tracy Bednarick (1996) and Ann Paeth (1997) were the Summer Semester Student Coordinators. Interviews were transcribed through summer 1998. Also includes a paper written on the history of Holland for the past fifty years by Tracy Bednarick.HC 0134
Patricia Doolittle Oral HistorySpecial Project 150 Stories for 150 Years. Several different interviewers, including staff and volunteers of the Joint Archives of Holland, with 170 different interviewees about their impressions of Holland, Michigan. Tracy Bednarick (1996) and Ann Paeth (1997) were the Summer Semester Student Coordinators. Interviews were transcribed through summer 1998. Also includes a paper written on the history of Holland for the past fifty years by Tracy Bednarick.HC 0135
Kay and Larry Dykstra Oral HistorySpecial Project 150 Stories for 150 Years. Several different interviewers, including staff and volunteers of the Joint Archives of Holland, with 170 different interviewees about their impressions of Holland, Michigan. Tracy Bednarick (1996) and Ann Paeth (1997) were the Summer Semester Student Coordinators. Interviews were transcribed through summer 1998. Also includes a paper written on the history of Holland for the past fifty years by Tracy Bednarick.HC 0136
Ed Easter Oral HistorySpecial Project 150 Stories for 150 Years. Several different interviewers, including staff and volunteers of the Joint Archives of Holland, with 170 different interviewees about their impressions of Holland, Michigan. Tracy Bednarick (1996) and Ann Paeth (1997) were the Summer Semester Student Coordinators. Interviews were transcribed through summer 1998. Also includes a paper written on the history of Holland for the past fifty years by Tracy Bednarick.HC 0137
James Essenburg Oral HistorySpecial Project 150 Stories for 150 Years. Several different interviewers, including staff and volunteers of the Joint Archives of Holland, with 170 different interviewees about their impressions of Holland, Michigan. Tracy Bednarick (1996) and Ann Paeth (1997) were the Summer Semester Student Coordinators. Interviews were transcribed through summer 1998. Also includes a paper written on the history of Holland for the past fifty years by Tracy Bednarick.HC 0138
Paul Fabiano Oral HistorySpecial Project 150 Stories for 150 Years. Several different interviewers, including staff and volunteers of the Joint Archives of Holland, with 170 different interviewees about their impressions of Holland, Michigan. Tracy Bednarick (1996) and Ann Paeth (1997) were the Summer Semester Student Coordinators. Interviews were transcribed through summer 1998. Also includes a paper written on the history of Holland for the past fifty years by Tracy Bednarick.HC 0139
Deb Feenstra Oral HistorySpecial Project 150 Stories for 150 Years. Several different interviewers, including staff and volunteers of the Joint Archives of Holland, with 170 different interviewees about their impressions of Holland, Michigan. Tracy Bednarick (1996) and Ann Paeth (1997) were the Summer Semester Student Coordinators. Interviews were transcribed through summer 1998. Also includes a paper written on the history of Holland for the past fifty years by Tracy Bednarick.HC 0140
Monica Giddy Oral HistorySpecial Project 150 Stories for 150 Years. Several different interviewers, including staff and volunteers of the Joint Archives of Holland, with 170 different interviewees about their impressions of Holland, Michigan. Tracy Bednarick (1996) and Ann Paeth (1997) were the Summer Semester Student Coordinators. Interviews were transcribed through summer 1998. Also includes a paper written on the history of Holland for the past fifty years by Tracy Bednarick.HC 0141
Barb Goodman Oral HistorySpecial Project 150 Stories for 150 Years. Several different interviewers, including staff and volunteers of the Joint Archives of Holland, with 170 different interviewees about their impressions of Holland, Michigan. Tracy Bednarick (1996) and Ann Paeth (1997) were the Summer Semester Student Coordinators. Interviews were transcribed through summer 1998. Also includes a paper written on the history of Holland for the past fifty years by Tracy Bednarick.HC 0142
Linda Graham Oral HistorySpecial Project 150 Stories for 150 Years. Several different interviewers, including staff and volunteers of the Joint Archives of Holland, with 170 different interviewees about their impressions of Holland, Michigan. Tracy Bednarick (1996) and Ann Paeth (1997) were the Summer Semester Student Coordinators. Interviews were transcribed through summer 1998. Also includes a paper written on the history of Holland for the past fifty years by Tracy Bednarick.HC 0143
Eric Gray Oral HistorySpecial Project 150 Stories for 150 Years. Several different interviewers, including staff and volunteers of the Joint Archives of Holland, with 170 different interviewees about their impressions of Holland, Michigan. Tracy Bednarick (1996) and Ann Paeth (1997) were the Summer Semester Student Coordinators. Interviews were transcribed through summer 1998. Also includes a paper written on the history of Holland for the past fifty years by Tracy Bednarick.HC 0144
Ray Gutierrez Oral HistorySpecial Project 150 Stories for 150 Years. Several different interviewers, including staff and volunteers of the Joint Archives of Holland, with 170 different interviewees about their impressions of Holland, Michigan. Tracy Bednarick (1996) and Ann Paeth (1997) were the Summer Semester Student Coordinators. Interviews were transcribed through summer 1998. Also includes a paper written on the history of Holland for the past fifty years by Tracy Bednarick.HC 0145
Ward and Celia Hamlin Oral HistorySpecial Project 150 Stories for 150 Years. Several different interviewers, including staff and volunteers of the Joint Archives of Holland, with 170 different interviewees about their impressions of Holland, Michigan. Tracy Bednarick (1996) and Ann Paeth (1997) were the Summer Semester Student Coordinators. Interviews were transcribed through summer 1998. Also includes a paper written on the history of Holland for the past fifty years by Tracy Bednarick.HC 0146
Carmen Hannah Oral HistorySpecial Project 150 Stories for 150 Years. Several different interviewers, including staff and volunteers of the Joint Archives of Holland, with 170 different interviewees about their impressions of Holland, Michigan. Tracy Bednarick (1996) and Ann Paeth (1997) were the Summer Semester Student Coordinators. Interviews were transcribed through summer 1998. Also includes a paper written on the history of Holland for the past fifty years by Tracy Bednarick.HC 0147
Swenna Harger Oral HistorySpecial Project 150 Stories for 150 Years. Several different interviewers, including staff and volunteers of the Joint Archives of Holland, with 170 different interviewees about their impressions of Holland, Michigan. Tracy Bednarick (1996) and Ann Paeth (1997) were the Summer Semester Student Coordinators. Interviews were transcribed through summer 1998. Also includes a paper written on the history of Holland for the past fifty years by Tracy Bednarick.HC 0148
Maureen Theresa Harun Oral HistorySpecial Project 150 Stories for 150 Years. Several different interviewers, including staff and volunteers of the Joint Archives of Holland, with 170 different interviewees about their impressions of Holland, Michigan. Tracy Bednarick (1996) and Ann Paeth (1997) were the Summer Semester Student Coordinators. Interviews were transcribed through summer 1998. Also includes a paper written on the history of Holland for the past fifty years by Tracy Bednarick.HC 0149
Carol Haverdink Oral HistorySpecial Project 150 Stories for 150 Years. Several different interviewers, including staff and volunteers of the Joint Archives of Holland, with 170 different interviewees about their impressions of Holland, Michigan. Tracy Bednarick (1996) and Ann Paeth (1997) were the Summer Semester Student Coordinators. Interviews were transcribed through summer 1998. Also includes a paper written on the history of Holland for the past fifty years by Tracy Bednarick.HC 0150
James Heerspink Oral HistorySpecial Project 150 Stories for 150 Years. Several different interviewers, including staff and volunteers of the Joint Archives of Holland, with 170 different interviewees about their impressions of Holland, Michigan. Tracy Bednarick (1996) and Ann Paeth (1997) were the Summer Semester Student Coordinators. Interviews were transcribed through summer 1998. Also includes a paper written on the history of Holland for the past fifty years by Tracy Bednarick.HC 0151
Evelyn Heffron Oral HistorySpecial Project 150 Stories for 150 Years. Several different interviewers, including staff and volunteers of the Joint Archives of Holland, with 170 different interviewees about their impressions of Holland, Michigan. Tracy Bednarick (1996) and Ann Paeth (1997) were the Summer Semester Student Coordinators. Interviews were transcribed through summer 1998. Also includes a paper written on the history of Holland for the past fifty years by Tracy Bednarick.HC 0152
Terry Hofmeyer Oral HistorySpecial Project 150 Stories for 150 Years. Several different interviewers, including staff and volunteers of the Joint Archives of Holland, with 170 different interviewees about their impressions of Holland, Michigan. Tracy Bednarick (1996) and Ann Paeth (1997) were the Summer Semester Student Coordinators. Interviews were transcribed through summer 1998. Also includes a paper written on the history of Holland for the past fifty years by Tracy Bednarick.HC 0153
Russell Hopkins Oral HistorySpecial Project 150 Stories for 150 Years. Several different interviewers, including staff and volunteers of the Joint Archives of Holland, with 170 different interviewees about their impressions of Holland, Michigan. Tracy Bednarick (1996) and Ann Paeth (1997) were the Summer Semester Student Coordinators. Interviews were transcribed through summer 1998. Also includes a paper written on the history of Holland for the past fifty years by Tracy Bednarick.HC 0154
Winifern Hornstra Oral HistorySpecial Project 150 Stories for 150 Years. Several different interviewers, including staff and volunteers of the Joint Archives of Holland, with 170 different interviewees about their impressions of Holland, Michigan. Tracy Bednarick (1996) and Ann Paeth (1997) were the Summer Semester Student Coordinators. Interviews were transcribed through summer 1998. Also includes a paper written on the history of Holland for the past fifty years by Tracy Bednarick.HC 0155
Charles Huttar Oral HistorySpecial Project 150 Stories for 150 Years. Several different interviewers, including staff and volunteers of the Joint Archives of Holland, with 170 different interviewees about their impressions of Holland, Michigan. Tracy Bednarick (1996) and Ann Paeth (1997) were the Summer Semester Student Coordinators. Interviews were transcribed through summer 1998. Also includes a paper written on the history of Holland for the past fifty years by Tracy Bednarick.HC 0156
Jim Jellison Oral HistorySpecial Project 150 Stories for 150 Years. Several different interviewers, including staff and volunteers of the Joint Archives of Holland, with 170 different interviewees about their impressions of Holland, Michigan. Tracy Bednarick (1996) and Ann Paeth (1997) were the Summer Semester Student Coordinators. Interviews were transcribed through summer 1998. Also includes a paper written on the history of Holland for the past fifty years by Tracy Bednarick.HC 0157
Rev. Charles Johnson Oral HistorySpecial Project 150 Stories for 150 Years. Several different interviewers, including staff and volunteers of the Joint Archives of Holland, with 170 different interviewees about their impressions of Holland, Michigan. Tracy Bednarick (1996) and Ann Paeth (1997) were the Summer Semester Student Coordinators. Interviews were transcribed through summer 1998. Also includes a paper written on the history of Holland for the past fifty years by Tracy Bednarick.HC 0158
Lois Kayes Oral HistorySpecial Project 150 Stories for 150 Years. Several different interviewers, including staff and volunteers of the Joint Archives of Holland, with 170 different interviewees about their impressions of Holland, Michigan. Tracy Bednarick (1996) and Ann Paeth (1997) were the Summer Semester Student Coordinators. Interviews were transcribed through summer 1998. Also includes a paper written on the history of Holland for the past fifty years by Tracy Bednarick.HC 0159
Harriet Kempkers Oral HistorySpecial Project 150 Stories for 150 Years. Several different interviewers, including staff and volunteers of the Joint Archives of Holland, with 170 different interviewees about their impressions of Holland, Michigan. Tracy Bednarick (1996) and Ann Paeth (1997) were the Summer Semester Student Coordinators. Interviews were transcribed through summer 1998. Also includes a paper written on the history of Holland for the past fifty years by Tracy Bednarick.HC 0160
Don Kiekintveld Oral HistorySpecial Project 150 Stories for 150 Years. Several different interviewers, including staff and volunteers of the Joint Archives of Holland, with 170 different interviewees about their impressions of Holland, Michigan. Tracy Bednarick (1996) and Ann Paeth (1997) were the Summer Semester Student Coordinators. Interviews were transcribed through summer 1998. Also includes a paper written on the history of Holland for the past fifty years by Tracy Bednarick.HC 0161
Marge Klaasen Oral HistorySpecial Project 150 Stories for 150 Years. Several different interviewers, including staff and volunteers of the Joint Archives of Holland, with 170 different interviewees about their impressions of Holland, Michigan. Tracy Bednarick (1996) and Ann Paeth (1997) were the Summer Semester Student Coordinators. Interviews were transcribed through summer 1998. Also includes a paper written on the history of Holland for the past fifty years by Tracy Bednarick.HC 0162
Victor Kleinheksel Oral HistorySpecial Project 150 Stories for 150 Years. Several different interviewers, including staff and volunteers of the Joint Archives of Holland, with 170 different interviewees about their impressions of Holland, Michigan. Tracy Bednarick (1996) and Ann Paeth (1997) were the Summer Semester Student Coordinators. Interviews were transcribed through summer 1998. Also includes a paper written on the history of Holland for the past fifty years by Tracy Bednarick.HC 0163
Barbara Lampen Oral HistorySpecial Project 150 Stories for 150 Years. Several different interviewers, including staff and volunteers of the Joint Archives of Holland, with 170 different interviewees about their impressions of Holland, Michigan. Tracy Bednarick (1996) and Ann Paeth (1997) were the Summer Semester Student Coordinators. Interviews were transcribed through summer 1998. Also includes a paper written on the history of Holland for the past fifty years by Tracy Bednarick.HC 0164
Edith Lappenga Oral HistorySpecial Project 150 Stories for 150 Years. Several different interviewers, including staff and volunteers of the Joint Archives of Holland, with 170 different interviewees about their impressions of Holland, Michigan. Tracy Bednarick (1996) and Ann Paeth (1997) were the Summer Semester Student Coordinators. Interviews were transcribed through summer 1998. Also includes a paper written on the history of Holland for the past fifty years by Tracy Bednarick.HC 0165
Ruth Large Oral HistorySpecial Project 150 Stories for 150 Years. Several different interviewers, including staff and volunteers of the Joint Archives of Holland, with 170 different interviewees about their impressions of Holland, Michigan. Tracy Bednarick (1996) and Ann Paeth (1997) were the Summer Semester Student Coordinators. Interviews were transcribed through summer 1998. Also includes a paper written on the history of Holland for the past fifty years by Tracy Bednarick.HC 0166
Chuck Lindstrom Oral HistorySpecial Project 150 Stories for 150 Years. Several different interviewers, including staff and volunteers of the Joint Archives of Holland, with 170 different interviewees about their impressions of Holland, Michigan. Tracy Bednarick (1996) and Ann Paeth (1997) were the Summer Semester Student Coordinators. Interviews were transcribed through summer 1998. Also includes a paper written on the history of Holland for the past fifty years by Tracy Bednarick.HC 0167
John Maassen Oral HistorySpecial Project 150 Stories for 150 Years. Several different interviewers, including staff and volunteers of the Joint Archives of Holland, with 170 different interviewees about their impressions of Holland, Michigan. Tracy Bednarick (1996) and Ann Paeth (1997) were the Summer Semester Student Coordinators. Interviews were transcribed through summer 1998. Also includes a paper written on the history of Holland for the past fifty years by Tracy Bednarick.HC 0168
Toni Mackay Oral HistorySpecial Project 150 Stories for 150 Years. Several different interviewers, including staff and volunteers of the Joint Archives of Holland, with 170 different interviewees about their impressions of Holland, Michigan. Tracy Bednarick (1996) and Ann Paeth (1997) were the Summer Semester Student Coordinators. Interviews were transcribed through summer 1998. Also includes a paper written on the history of Holland for the past fifty years by Tracy Bednarick.HC 0169
Beth Marcus Oral HistorySpecial Project 150 Stories for 150 Years. Several different interviewers, including staff and volunteers of the Joint Archives of Holland, with 170 different interviewees about their impressions of Holland, Michigan. Tracy Bednarick (1996) and Ann Paeth (1997) were the Summer Semester Student Coordinators. Interviews were transcribed through summer 1998. Also includes a paper written on the history of Holland for the past fifty years by Tracy Bednarick.HC 0170
Imelda Martinez Oral HistorySpecial Project 150 Stories for 150 Years. Several different interviewers, including staff and volunteers of the Joint Archives of Holland, with 170 different interviewees about their impressions of Holland, Michigan. Tracy Bednarick (1996) and Ann Paeth (1997) were the Summer Semester Student Coordinators. Interviews were transcribed through summer 1998. Also includes a paper written on the history of Holland for the past fifty years by Tracy Bednarick.HC 0171
Rene and Clara Mascorro Oral HistorySpecial Project 150 Stories for 150 Years. Several different interviewers, including staff and volunteers of the Joint Archives of Holland, with 170 different interviewees about their impressions of Holland, Michigan. Tracy Bednarick (1996) and Ann Paeth (1997) were the Summer Semester Student Coordinators. Interviews were transcribed through summer 1998. Also includes a paper written on the history of Holland for the past fifty years by Tracy Bednarick.HC 0172
Al McGeehan Oral HistorySpecial Project 150 Stories for 150 Years. Several different interviewers, including staff and volunteers of the Joint Archives of Holland, with 170 different interviewees about their impressions of Holland, Michigan. Tracy Bednarick (1996) and Ann Paeth (1997) were the Summer Semester Student Coordinators. Interviews were transcribed through summer 1998. Also includes a paper written on the history of Holland for the past fifty years by Tracy Bednarick.HC 0173
Charles McLean Oral HistorySpecial Project 150 Stories for 150 Years. Several different interviewers, including staff and volunteers of the Joint Archives of Holland, with 170 different interviewees about their impressions of Holland, Michigan. Tracy Bednarick (1996) and Ann Paeth (1997) were the Summer Semester Student Coordinators. Interviews were transcribed through summer 1998. Also includes a paper written on the history of Holland for the past fifty years by Tracy Bednarick.HC 0174
Harriet Meyer Oral HistorySpecial Project 150 Stories for 150 Years. Several different interviewers, including staff and volunteers of the Joint Archives of Holland, with 170 different interviewees about their impressions of Holland, Michigan. Tracy Bednarick (1996) and Ann Paeth (1997) were the Summer Semester Student Coordinators. Interviews were transcribed through summer 1998. Also includes a paper written on the history of Holland for the past fifty years by Tracy Bednarick.HC 0175
Diana Mireles Oral HistorySpecial Project 150 Stories for 150 Years. Several different interviewers, including staff and volunteers of the Joint Archives of Holland, with 170 different interviewees about their impressions of Holland, Michigan. Tracy Bednarick (1996) and Ann Paeth (1997) were the Summer Semester Student Coordinators. Interviews were transcribed through summer 1998. Also includes a paper written on the history of Holland for the past fifty years by Tracy Bednarick.HC 0176
Cobie Moore Oral HistorySpecial Project 150 Stories for 150 Years. Several different interviewers, including staff and volunteers of the Joint Archives of Holland, with 170 different interviewees about their impressions of Holland, Michigan. Tracy Bednarick (1996) and Ann Paeth (1997) were the Summer Semester Student Coordinators. Interviews were transcribed through summer 1998. Also includes a paper written on the history of Holland for the past fifty years by Tracy Bednarick.HC 0177
Emily Mouw Oral HistorySpecial Project 150 Stories for 150 Years. Several different interviewers, including staff and volunteers of the Joint Archives of Holland, with 170 different interviewees about their impressions of Holland, Michigan. Tracy Bednarick (1996) and Ann Paeth (1997) were the Summer Semester Student Coordinators. Interviews were transcribed through summer 1998. Also includes a paper written on the history of Holland for the past fifty years by Tracy Bednarick.HC 0178
Henry Mouw Oral HistorySpecial Project 150 Stories for 150 Years. Several different interviewers, including staff and volunteers of the Joint Archives of Holland, with 170 different interviewees about their impressions of Holland, Michigan. Tracy Bednarick (1996) and Ann Paeth (1997) were the Summer Semester Student Coordinators. Interviews were transcribed through summer 1998. Also includes a paper written on the history of Holland for the past fifty years by Tracy Bednarick.HC 0179
Socheth Na Oral HistorySpecial Project 150 Stories for 150 Years. Several different interviewers, including staff and volunteers of the Joint Archives of Holland, with 170 different interviewees about their impressions of Holland, Michigan. Tracy Bednarick (1996) and Ann Paeth (1997) were the Summer Semester Student Coordinators. Interviews were transcribed through summer 1998. Also includes a paper written on the history of Holland for the past fifty years by Tracy Bednarick.HC 0180
Harry and Sandy Nelis Oral HistorySpecial Project 150 Stories for 150 Years. Several different interviewers, including staff and volunteers of the Joint Archives of Holland, with 170 different interviewees about their impressions of Holland, Michigan. Tracy Bednarick (1996) and Ann Paeth (1997) were the Summer Semester Student Coordinators. Interviews were transcribed through summer 1998. Also includes a paper written on the history of Holland for the past fifty years by Tracy Bednarick.HC 0181
Carolyn Nienhuis Oral HistorySpecial Project 150 Stories for 150 Years. Several different interviewers, including staff and volunteers of the Joint Archives of Holland, with 170 different interviewees about their impressions of Holland, Michigan. Tracy Bednarick (1996) and Ann Paeth (1997) were the Summer Semester Student Coordinators. Interviews were transcribed through summer 1998. Also includes a paper written on the history of Holland for the past fifty years by Tracy Bednarick.HC 0182
Rosa Nino Oral HistorySpecial Project 150 Stories for 150 Years. Several different interviewers, including staff and volunteers of the Joint Archives of Holland, with 170 different interviewees about their impressions of Holland, Michigan. Tracy Bednarick (1996) and Ann Paeth (1997) were the Summer Semester Student Coordinators. Interviews were transcribed through summer 1998. Also includes a paper written on the history of Holland for the past fifty years by Tracy Bednarick.HC 0183
Russ Norden Oral HistorySpecial Project 150 Stories for 150 Years. Several different interviewers, including staff and volunteers of the Joint Archives of Holland, with 170 different interviewees about their impressions of Holland, Michigan. Tracy Bednarick (1996) and Ann Paeth (1997) were the Summer Semester Student Coordinators. Interviews were transcribed through summer 1998. Also includes a paper written on the history of Holland for the past fifty years by Tracy Bednarick.HC 0184
Victor Orozco Oral HistorySpecial Project 150 Stories for 150 Years. Several different interviewers, including staff and volunteers of the Joint Archives of Holland, with 170 different interviewees about their impressions of Holland, Michigan. Tracy Bednarick (1996) and Ann Paeth (1997) were the Summer Semester Student Coordinators. Interviews were transcribed through summer 1998. Also includes a paper written on the history of Holland for the past fifty years by Tracy Bednarick.HC 0185
M. Osterhaven Oral HistorySpecial Project 150 Stories for 150 Years. Several different interviewers, including staff and volunteers of the Joint Archives of Holland, with 170 different interviewees about their impressions of Holland, Michigan. Tracy Bednarick (1996) and Ann Paeth (1997) were the Summer Semester Student Coordinators. Interviews were transcribed through summer 1998. Also includes a paper written on the history of Holland for the past fifty years by Tracy Bednarick.HC 0186
Richard Oudersluys Oral HistorySpecial Project 150 Stories for 150 Years. Several different interviewers, including staff and volunteers of the Joint Archives of Holland, with 170 different interviewees about their impressions of Holland, Michigan. Tracy Bednarick (1996) and Ann Paeth (1997) were the Summer Semester Student Coordinators. Interviews were transcribed through summer 1998. Also includes a paper written on the history of Holland for the past fifty years by Tracy Bednarick.HC 0187
Seymour Padnos Oral HistorySpecial Project 150 Stories for 150 Years. Several different interviewers, including staff and volunteers of the Joint Archives of Holland, with 170 different interviewees about their impressions of Holland, Michigan. Tracy Bednarick (1996) and Ann Paeth (1997) were the Summer Semester Student Coordinators. Interviews were transcribed through summer 1998. Also includes a paper written on the history of Holland for the past fifty years by Tracy Bednarick.HC 0188
Stuart Padnos Oral HistorySpecial Project 150 Stories for 150 Years. Several different interviewers, including staff and volunteers of the Joint Archives of Holland, with 170 different interviewees about their impressions of Holland, Michigan. Tracy Bednarick (1996) and Ann Paeth (1997) were the Summer Semester Student Coordinators. Interviews were transcribed through summer 1998. Also includes a paper written on the history of Holland for the past fifty years by Tracy Bednarick.HC 0189
Ernest Penna Oral HistorySpecial Project 150 Stories for 150 Years. Several different interviewers, including staff and volunteers of the Joint Archives of Holland, with 170 different interviewees about their impressions of Holland, Michigan. Tracy Bednarick (1996) and Ann Paeth (1997) were the Summer Semester Student Coordinators. Interviews were transcribed through summer 1998. Also includes a paper written on the history of Holland for the past fifty years by Tracy Bednarick.HC 0190
Herminio Perez Oral HistorySpecial Project 150 Stories for 150 Years. Several different interviewers, including staff and volunteers of the Joint Archives of Holland, with 170 different interviewees about their impressions of Holland, Michigan. Tracy Bednarick (1996) and Ann Paeth (1997) were the Summer Semester Student Coordinators. Interviews were transcribed through summer 1998. Also includes a paper written on the history of Holland for the past fifty years by Tracy Bednarick.HC 0191
Howard Poll Oral HistorySpecial Project 150 Stories for 150 Years. Several different interviewers, including staff and volunteers of the Joint Archives of Holland, with 170 different interviewees about their impressions of Holland, Michigan. Tracy Bednarick (1996) and Ann Paeth (1997) were the Summer Semester Student Coordinators. Interviews were transcribed through summer 1998. Also includes a paper written on the history of Holland for the past fifty years by Tracy Bednarick.HC 0192
Lambert Ponstein Oral HistorySpecial Project 150 Stories for 150 Years. Several different interviewers, including staff and volunteers of the Joint Archives of Holland, with 170 different interviewees about their impressions of Holland, Michigan. Tracy Bednarick (1996) and Ann Paeth (1997) were the Summer Semester Student Coordinators. Interviews were transcribed through summer 1998. Also includes a paper written on the history of Holland for the past fifty years by Tracy Bednarick.HC 0193
Don Postma Oral HistorySpecial Project 150 Stories for 150 Years. Several different interviewers, including staff and volunteers of the Joint Archives of Holland, with 170 different interviewees about their impressions of Holland, Michigan. Tracy Bednarick (1996) and Ann Paeth (1997) were the Summer Semester Student Coordinators. Interviews were transcribed through summer 1998. Also includes a paper written on the history of Holland for the past fifty years by Tracy Bednarick.HC 0194
Jean Postma Oral HistorySpecial Project 150 Stories for 150 Years. Several different interviewers, including staff and volunteers of the Joint Archives of Holland, with 170 different interviewees about their impressions of Holland, Michigan. Tracy Bednarick (1996) and Ann Paeth (1997) were the Summer Semester Student Coordinators. Interviews were transcribed through summer 1998. Also includes a paper written on the history of Holland for the past fifty years by Tracy Bednarick.HC 0195
Leona Postma Oral HistorySpecial Project 150 Stories for 150 Years. Several different interviewers, including staff and volunteers of the Joint Archives of Holland, with 170 different interviewees about their impressions of Holland, Michigan. Tracy Bednarick (1996) and Ann Paeth (1997) were the Summer Semester Student Coordinators. Interviews were transcribed through summer 1998. Also includes a paper written on the history of Holland for the past fifty years by Tracy Bednarick.HC 0196
Clare Pott Oral HistorySpecial Project 150 Stories for 150 Years. Several different interviewers, including staff and volunteers of the Joint Archives of Holland, with 170 different interviewees about their impressions of Holland, Michigan. Tracy Bednarick (1996) and Ann Paeth (1997) were the Summer Semester Student Coordinators. Interviews were transcribed through summer 1998. Also includes a paper written on the history of Holland for the past fifty years by Tracy Bednarick.HC 0197
Khamphan Pradith Oral HistorySpecial Project 150 Stories for 150 Years. Several different interviewers, including staff and volunteers of the Joint Archives of Holland, with 170 different interviewees about their impressions of Holland, Michigan. Tracy Bednarick (1996) and Ann Paeth (1997) were the Summer Semester Student Coordinators. Interviews were transcribed through summer 1998. Also includes a paper written on the history of Holland for the past fifty years by Tracy Bednarick.HC 0198
Aden Ramirez Oral HistorySpecial Project 150 Stories for 150 Years. Several different interviewers, including staff and volunteers of the Joint Archives of Holland, with 170 different interviewees about their impressions of Holland, Michigan. Tracy Bednarick (1996) and Ann Paeth (1997) were the Summer Semester Student Coordinators. Interviews were transcribed through summer 1998. Also includes a paper written on the history of Holland for the past fifty years by Tracy Bednarick.HC 0199
Joyce Rapier Oral HistorySpecial Project 150 Stories for 150 Years. Several different interviewers, including staff and volunteers of the Joint Archives of Holland, with 170 different interviewees about their impressions of Holland, Michigan. Tracy Bednarick (1996) and Ann Paeth (1997) were the Summer Semester Student Coordinators. Interviews were transcribed through summer 1998. Also includes a paper written on the history of Holland for the past fifty years by Tracy Bednarick.HC 0200
Lucille Rauch Oral HistorySpecial Project 150 Stories for 150 Years. Several different interviewers, including staff and volunteers of the Joint Archives of Holland, with 170 different interviewees about their impressions of Holland, Michigan. Tracy Bednarick (1996) and Ann Paeth (1997) were the Summer Semester Student Coordinators. Interviews were transcribed through summer 1998. Also includes a paper written on the history of Holland for the past fifty years by Tracy Bednarick.HC 0201
Luis Rebolledo Oral HistorySpecial Project 150 Stories for 150 Years. Several different interviewers, including staff and volunteers of the Joint Archives of Holland, with 170 different interviewees about their impressions of Holland, Michigan. Tracy Bednarick (1996) and Ann Paeth (1997) were the Summer Semester Student Coordinators. Interviews were transcribed through summer 1998. Also includes a paper written on the history of Holland for the past fifty years by Tracy Bednarick.HC 0202
Meridith Ridl Oral HistorySpecial Project 150 Stories for 150 Years. Several different interviewers, including staff and volunteers of the Joint Archives of Holland, with 170 different interviewees about their impressions of Holland, Michigan. Tracy Bednarick (1996) and Ann Paeth (1997) were the Summer Semester Student Coordinators. Interviews were transcribed through summer 1998. Also includes a paper written on the history of Holland for the past fifty years by Tracy Bednarick.HC 0203
Al Rios Oral HistorySpecial Project 150 Stories for 150 Years. Several different interviewers, including staff and volunteers of the Joint Archives of Holland, with 170 different interviewees about their impressions of Holland, Michigan. Tracy Bednarick (1996) and Ann Paeth (1997) were the Summer Semester Student Coordinators. Interviews were transcribed through summer 1998. Also includes a paper written on the history of Holland for the past fifty years by Tracy Bednarick.HC 0204
Julio Rios Oral HistorySpecial Project 150 Stories for 150 Years. Several different interviewers, including staff and volunteers of the Joint Archives of Holland, with 170 different interviewees about their impressions of Holland, Michigan. Tracy Bednarick (1996) and Ann Paeth (1997) were the Summer Semester Student Coordinators. Interviews were transcribed through summer 1998. Also includes a paper written on the history of Holland for the past fifty years by Tracy Bednarick.HC 0205
Fred Rodriguez Oral HistorySpecial Project 150 Stories for 150 Years. Several different interviewers, including staff and volunteers of the Joint Archives of Holland, with 170 different interviewees about their impressions of Holland, Michigan. Tracy Bednarick (1996) and Ann Paeth (1997) were the Summer Semester Student Coordinators. Interviews were transcribed through summer 1998. Also includes a paper written on the history of Holland for the past fifty years by Tracy Bednarick.HC 0206
Anital Rudel Oral HistorySpecial Project 150 Stories for 150 Years. Several different interviewers, including staff and volunteers of the Joint Archives of Holland, with 170 different interviewees about their impressions of Holland, Michigan. Tracy Bednarick (1996) and Ann Paeth (1997) were the Summer Semester Student Coordinators. Interviews were transcribed through summer 1998. Also includes a paper written on the history of Holland for the past fifty years by Tracy Bednarick.HC 0207
Elizabeth Schaap Oral HistorySpecial Project 150 Stories for 150 Years. Several different interviewers, including staff and volunteers of the Joint Archives of Holland, with 170 different interviewees about their impressions of Holland, Michigan. Tracy Bednarick (1996) and Ann Paeth (1997) were the Summer Semester Student Coordinators. Interviews were transcribed through summer 1998. Also includes a paper written on the history of Holland for the past fifty years by Tracy Bednarick.HC 0208
Howard and Marybelle Schipper Oral HistorySpecial Project 150 Stories for 150 Years. Several different interviewers, including staff and volunteers of the Joint Archives of Holland, with 170 different interviewees about their impressions of Holland, Michigan. Tracy Bednarick (1996) and Ann Paeth (1997) were the Summer Semester Student Coordinators. Interviews were transcribed through summer 1998. Also includes a paper written on the history of Holland for the past fifty years by Tracy Bednarick.HC 0209
Vern Schipper Oral HistorySpecial Project 150 Stories for 150 Years. Several different interviewers, including staff and volunteers of the Joint Archives of Holland, with 170 different interviewees about their impressions of Holland, Michigan. Tracy Bednarick (1996) and Ann Paeth (1997) were the Summer Semester Student Coordinators. Interviews were transcribed through summer 1998. Also includes a paper written on the history of Holland for the past fifty years by Tracy Bednarick.HC 0210
Eugene Scholten Oral HistorySpecial Project 150 Stories for 150 Years. Several different interviewers, including staff and volunteers of the Joint Archives of Holland, with 170 different interviewees about their impressions of Holland, Michigan. Tracy Bednarick (1996) and Ann Paeth (1997) were the Summer Semester Student Coordinators. Interviews were transcribed through summer 1998. Also includes a paper written on the history of Holland for the past fifty years by Tracy Bednarick.HC 0211
Juliet Schutmaat Oral HistorySpecial Project 150 Stories for 150 Years. Several different interviewers, including staff and volunteers of the Joint Archives of Holland, with 170 different interviewees about their impressions of Holland, Michigan. Tracy Bednarick (1996) and Ann Paeth (1997) were the Summer Semester Student Coordinators. Interviews were transcribed through summer 1998. Also includes a paper written on the history of Holland for the past fifty years by Tracy Bednarick.HC 0212
John Schutten Oral HistorySpecial Project 150 Stories for 150 Years. Several different interviewers, including staff and volunteers of the Joint Archives of Holland, with 170 different interviewees about their impressions of Holland, Michigan. Tracy Bednarick (1996) and Ann Paeth (1997) were the Summer Semester Student Coordinators. Interviews were transcribed through summer 1998. Also includes a paper written on the history of Holland for the past fifty years by Tracy Bednarick.HC 0213
Al Serrano Oral HistorySpecial Project 150 Stories for 150 Years. Several different interviewers, including staff and volunteers of the Joint Archives of Holland, with 170 different interviewees about their impressions of Holland, Michigan. Tracy Bednarick (1996) and Ann Paeth (1997) were the Summer Semester Student Coordinators. Interviews were transcribed through summer 1998. Also includes a paper written on the history of Holland for the past fifty years by Tracy Bednarick.HC 0214
Marion Shackson Oral HistorySpecial Project 150 Stories for 150 Years. Several different interviewers, including staff and volunteers of the Joint Archives of Holland, with 170 different interviewees about their impressions of Holland, Michigan. Tracy Bednarick (1996) and Ann Paeth (1997) were the Summer Semester Student Coordinators. Interviews were transcribed through summer 1998. Also includes a paper written on the history of Holland for the past fifty years by Tracy Bednarick.HC 0215
Charles and Millie Shidler Oral HistorySpecial Project 150 Stories for 150 Years. Several different interviewers, including staff and volunteers of the Joint Archives of Holland, with 170 different interviewees about their impressions of Holland, Michigan. Tracy Bednarick (1996) and Ann Paeth (1997) were the Summer Semester Student Coordinators. Interviews were transcribed through summer 1998. Also includes a paper written on the history of Holland for the past fifty years by Tracy Bednarick.HC 0216
William Sikkel Oral HistorySpecial Project 150 Stories for 150 Years. Several different interviewers, including staff and volunteers of the Joint Archives of Holland, with 170 different interviewees about their impressions of Holland, Michigan. Tracy Bednarick (1996) and Ann Paeth (1997) were the Summer Semester Student Coordinators. Interviews were transcribed through summer 1998. Also includes a paper written on the history of Holland for the past fifty years by Tracy Bednarick.HC 0218
Antonio Soto Oral HistorySpecial Project 150 Stories for 150 Years. Several different interviewers, including staff and volunteers of the Joint Archives of Holland, with 170 different interviewees about their impressions of Holland, Michigan. Tracy Bednarick (1996) and Ann Paeth (1997) were the Summer Semester Student Coordinators. Interviews were transcribed through summer 1998. Also includes a paper written on the history of Holland for the past fifty years by Tracy Bednarick.HC 0219
Margaret Steffens Oral HistorySpecial Project 150 Stories for 150 Years. Several different interviewers, including staff and volunteers of the Joint Archives of Holland, with 170 different interviewees about their impressions of Holland, Michigan. Tracy Bednarick (1996) and Ann Paeth (1997) were the Summer Semester Student Coordinators. Interviews were transcribed through summer 1998. Also includes a paper written on the history of Holland for the past fifty years by Tracy Bednarick.HC 0220
Clifford Steketee Oral HistorySpecial Project 150 Stories for 150 Years. Several different interviewers, including staff and volunteers of the Joint Archives of Holland, with 170 different interviewees about their impressions of Holland, Michigan. Tracy Bednarick (1996) and Ann Paeth (1997) were the Summer Semester Student Coordinators. Interviews were transcribed through summer 1998. Also includes a paper written on the history of Holland for the past fifty years by Tracy Bednarick.HC 0221
Cornelius Steketee Oral HistorySpecial Project 150 Stories for 150 Years. Several different interviewers, including staff and volunteers of the Joint Archives of Holland, with 170 different interviewees about their impressions of Holland, Michigan. Tracy Bednarick (1996) and Ann Paeth (1997) were the Summer Semester Student Coordinators. Interviews were transcribed through summer 1998. Also includes a paper written on the history of Holland for the past fifty years by Tracy Bednarick.HC 0222
Bill Stronks Oral HistorySpecial Project 150 Stories for 150 Years. Several different interviewers, including staff and volunteers of the Joint Archives of Holland, with 170 different interviewees about their impressions of Holland, Michigan. Tracy Bednarick (1996) and Ann Paeth (1997) were the Summer Semester Student Coordinators. Interviews were transcribed through summer 1998. Also includes a paper written on the history of Holland for the past fifty years by Tracy Bednarick.HC 0223
Mary Stygstra Oral HistorySpecial Project 150 Stories for 150 Years. Several different interviewers, including staff and volunteers of the Joint Archives of Holland, with 170 different interviewees about their impressions of Holland, Michigan. Tracy Bednarick (1996) and Ann Paeth (1997) were the Summer Semester Student Coordinators. Interviews were transcribed through summer 1998. Also includes a paper written on the history of Holland for the past fifty years by Tracy Bednarick.HC 0224
Elaine Tanis Oral HistorySpecial Project 150 Stories for 150 Years. Several different interviewers, including staff and volunteers of the Joint Archives of Holland, with 170 different interviewees about their impressions of Holland, Michigan. Tracy Bednarick (1996) and Ann Paeth (1997) were the Summer Semester Student Coordinators. Interviews were transcribed through summer 1998. Also includes a paper written on the history of Holland for the past fifty years by Tracy Bednarick.HC 0225
Maria Tapia Oral HistorySpecial Project 150 Stories for 150 Years. Several different interviewers, including staff and volunteers of the Joint Archives of Holland, with 170 different interviewees about their impressions of Holland, Michigan. Tracy Bednarick (1996) and Ann Paeth (1997) were the Summer Semester Student Coordinators. Interviews were transcribed through summer 1998. Also includes a paper written on the history of Holland for the past fifty years by Tracy Bednarick.HC 0226
Art and Janet Tazelaar Oral HistorySpecial Project 150 Stories for 150 Years. Several different interviewers, including staff and volunteers of the Joint Archives of Holland, with 170 different interviewees about their impressions of Holland, Michigan. Tracy Bednarick (1996) and Ann Paeth (1997) were the Summer Semester Student Coordinators. Interviews were transcribed through summer 1998. Also includes a paper written on the history of Holland for the past fifty years by Tracy Bednarick.HC 0227
Henry ten Hoor Oral HistorySpecial Project 150 Stories for 150 Years. Several different interviewers, including staff and volunteers of the Joint Archives of Holland, with 170 different interviewees about their impressions of Holland, Michigan. Tracy Bednarick (1996) and Ann Paeth (1997) were the Summer Semester Student Coordinators. Interviews were transcribed through summer 1998. Also includes a paper written on the history of Holland for the past fifty years by Tracy Bednarick.HC 0228
Clayton Ter Haar Oral HistorySpecial Project 150 Stories for 150 Years. Several different interviewers, including staff and volunteers of the Joint Archives of Holland, with 170 different interviewees about their impressions of Holland, Michigan. Tracy Bednarick (1996) and Ann Paeth (1997) were the Summer Semester Student Coordinators. Interviews were transcribed through summer 1998. Also includes a paper written on the history of Holland for the past fifty years by Tracy Bednarick.HC 0229
Eugene Teusink Oral HistorySpecial Project 150 Stories for 150 Years. Several different interviewers, including staff and volunteers of the Joint Archives of Holland, with 170 different interviewees about their impressions of Holland, Michigan. Tracy Bednarick (1996) and Ann Paeth (1997) were the Summer Semester Student Coordinators. Interviews were transcribed through summer 1998. Also includes a paper written on the history of Holland for the past fifty years by Tracy Bednarick.HC 0230
Howard Topp Oral HistorySpecial Project 150 Stories for 150 Years. Several different interviewers, including staff and volunteers of the Joint Archives of Holland, with 170 different interviewees about their impressions of Holland, Michigan. Tracy Bednarick (1996) and Ann Paeth (1997) were the Summer Semester Student Coordinators. Interviews were transcribed through summer 1998. Also includes a paper written on the history of Holland for the past fifty years by Tracy Bednarick.HC 0231
Drew Torres Oral HistorySpecial Project 150 Stories for 150 Years. Several different interviewers, including staff and volunteers of the Joint Archives of Holland, with 170 different interviewees about their impressions of Holland, Michigan. Tracy Bednarick (1996) and Ann Paeth (1997) were the Summer Semester Student Coordinators. Interviews were transcribed through summer 1998. Also includes a paper written on the history of Holland for the past fifty years by Tracy Bednarick.HC 0232
James Townsend Oral HistorySpecial Project 150 Stories for 150 Years. Several different interviewers, including staff and volunteers of the Joint Archives of Holland, with 170 different interviewees about their impressions of Holland, Michigan. Tracy Bednarick (1996) and Ann Paeth (1997) were the Summer Semester Student Coordinators. Interviews were transcribed through summer 1998. Also includes a paper written on the history of Holland for the past fifty years by Tracy Bednarick.HC 0233
Maria Trevino Oral HistorySpecial Project 150 Stories for 150 Years. Several different interviewers, including staff and volunteers of the Joint Archives of Holland, with 170 different interviewees about their impressions of Holland, Michigan. Tracy Bednarick (1996) and Ann Paeth (1997) were the Summer Semester Student Coordinators. Interviews were transcribed through summer 1998. Also includes a paper written on the history of Holland for the past fifty years by Tracy Bednarick.HC 0234
Mike Van Ark Oral HistorySpecial Project 150 Stories for 150 Years. Several different interviewers, including staff and volunteers of the Joint Archives of Holland, with 170 different interviewees about their impressions of Holland, Michigan. Tracy Bednarick (1996) and Ann Paeth (1997) were the Summer Semester Student Coordinators. Interviews were transcribed through summer 1998. Also includes a paper written on the history of Holland for the past fifty years by Tracy Bednarick.HC 0235
Ralph Van Asperen Oral HistorySpecial Project 150 Stories for 150 Years. Several different interviewers, including staff and volunteers of the Joint Archives of Holland, with 170 different interviewees about their impressions of Holland, Michigan. Tracy Bednarick (1996) and Ann Paeth (1997) were the Summer Semester Student Coordinators. Interviews were transcribed through summer 1998. Also includes a paper written on the history of Holland for the past fifty years by Tracy Bednarick.HC 0236
Jan Bosch Oral HistorySpecial Project 150 Stories for 150 Years. Several different interviewers, including staff and volunteers of the Joint Archives of Holland, with 170 different interviewees about their impressions of Holland, Michigan. Tracy Bednarick (1996) and Ann Paeth (1997) were the Summer Semester Student Coordinators. Interviews were transcribed through summer 1998. Also includes a paper written on the history of Holland for the past fifty years by Tracy Bednarick.HC 0237
Trudy Hill Oral HistorySpecial Project 150 Stories for 150 Years. Several different interviewers, including staff and volunteers of the Joint Archives of Holland, with 170 different interviewees about their impressions of Holland, Michigan. Tracy Bednarick (1996) and Ann Paeth (1997) were the Summer Semester Student Coordinators. Interviews were transcribed through summer 1998. Also includes a paper written on the history of Holland for the past fifty years by Tracy Bednarick.HC 0238
Henry VanderLinde Oral HistorySpecial Project 150 Stories for 150 Years. Several different interviewers, including staff and volunteers of the Joint Archives of Holland, with 170 different interviewees about their impressions of Holland, Michigan. Tracy Bednarick (1996) and Ann Paeth (1997) were the Summer Semester Student Coordinators. Interviews were transcribed through summer 1998. Also includes a paper written on the history of Holland for the past fifty years by Tracy Bednarick.HC 0239
Henry Plow Oral HistorySpecial Project 150 Stories for 150 Years. Several different interviewers, including staff and volunteers of the Joint Archives of Holland, with 170 different interviewees about their impressions of Holland, Michigan. Tracy Bednarick (1996) and Ann Paeth (1997) were the Summer Semester Student Coordinators. Interviews were transcribed through summer 1998. Also includes a paper written on the history of Holland for the past fifty years by Tracy Bednarick.HC 0240
Gerald Vusse Oral HistorySpecial Project 150 Stories for 150 Years. Several different interviewers, including staff and volunteers of the Joint Archives of Holland, with 170 different interviewees about their impressions of Holland, Michigan. Tracy Bednarick (1996) and Ann Paeth (1997) were the Summer Semester Student Coordinators. Interviews were transcribed through summer 1998. Also includes a paper written on the history of Holland for the past fifty years by Tracy Bednarick.HC 0241
Randy Water Oral HistorySpecial Project 150 Stories for 150 Years. Several different interviewers, including staff and volunteers of the Joint Archives of Holland, with 170 different interviewees about their impressions of Holland, Michigan. Tracy Bednarick (1996) and Ann Paeth (1997) were the Summer Semester Student Coordinators. Interviews were transcribed through summer 1998. Also includes a paper written on the history of Holland for the past fifty years by Tracy Bednarick.HC 0242
Mary Wege Oral HistorySpecial Project 150 Stories for 150 Years. Several different interviewers, including staff and volunteers of the Joint Archives of Holland, with 170 different interviewees about their impressions of Holland, Michigan. Tracy Bednarick (1996) and Ann Paeth (1997) were the Summer Semester Student Coordinators. Interviews were transcribed through summer 1998. Also includes a paper written on the history of Holland for the past fifty years by Tracy Bednarick.HC 0243
Evelyn Van Dorp Oral HistorySpecial Project 150 Stories for 150 Years. Several different interviewers, including staff and volunteers of the Joint Archives of Holland, with 170 different interviewees about their impressions of Holland, Michigan. Tracy Bednarick (1996) and Ann Paeth (1997) were the Summer Semester Student Coordinators. Interviews were transcribed through summer 1998. Also includes a paper written on the history of Holland for the past fifty years by Tracy Bednarick.HC 0244
Lillian Van Dyke Oral HistorySpecial Project 150 Stories for 150 Years. Several different interviewers, including staff and volunteers of the Joint Archives of Holland, with 170 different interviewees about their impressions of Holland, Michigan. Tracy Bednarick (1996) and Ann Paeth (1997) were the Summer Semester Student Coordinators. Interviews were transcribed through summer 1998. Also includes a paper written on the history of Holland for the past fifty years by Tracy Bednarick.HC 0245
Isla Van Eenanam Oral HistorySpecial Project 150 Stories for 150 Years. Several different interviewers, including staff and volunteers of the Joint Archives of Holland, with 170 different interviewees about their impressions of Holland, Michigan. Tracy Bednarick (1996) and Ann Paeth (1997) were the Summer Semester Student Coordinators. Interviews were transcribed through summer 1998. Also includes a paper written on the history of Holland for the past fifty years by Tracy Bednarick.HC 0246
Paul Van Faasen Oral HistorySpecial Project 150 Stories for 150 Years. Several different interviewers, including staff and volunteers of the Joint Archives of Holland, with 170 different interviewees about their impressions of Holland, Michigan. Tracy Bednarick (1996) and Ann Paeth (1997) were the Summer Semester Student Coordinators. Interviews were transcribed through summer 1998. Also includes a paper written on the history of Holland for the past fifty years by Tracy Bednarick.HC 0247
Dr. Titus Van Haitsma Oral HistorySpecial Project 150 Stories for 150 Years. Several different interviewers, including staff and volunteers of the Joint Archives of Holland, with 170 different interviewees about their impressions of Holland, Michigan. Tracy Bednarick (1996) and Ann Paeth (1997) were the Summer Semester Student Coordinators. Interviews were transcribed through summer 1998. Also includes a paper written on the history of Holland for the past fifty years by Tracy Bednarick.HC 0248
Juke Van Oss Oral HistorySpecial Project 150 Stories for 150 Years. Several different interviewers, including staff and volunteers of the Joint Archives of Holland, with 170 different interviewees about their impressions of Holland, Michigan. Tracy Bednarick (1996) and Ann Paeth (1997) were the Summer Semester Student Coordinators. Interviews were transcribed through summer 1998. Also includes a paper written on the history of Holland for the past fifty years by Tracy Bednarick.HC 0249
Edwin Van Spyker Oral HistorySpecial Project 150 Stories for 150 Years. Several different interviewers, including staff and volunteers of the Joint Archives of Holland, with 170 different interviewees about their impressions of Holland, Michigan. Tracy Bednarick (1996) and Ann Paeth (1997) were the Summer Semester Student Coordinators. Interviews were transcribed through summer 1998. Also includes a paper written on the history of Holland for the past fifty years by Tracy Bednarick.HC 0250
Julia Van Tatenhove Oral HistorySpecial Project 150 Stories for 150 Years. Several different interviewers, including staff and volunteers of the Joint Archives of Holland, with 170 different interviewees about their impressions of Holland, Michigan. Tracy Bednarick (1996) and Ann Paeth (1997) were the Summer Semester Student Coordinators. Interviews were transcribed through summer 1998. Also includes a paper written on the history of Holland for the past fifty years by Tracy Bednarick.HC 0251
Gordon Van Wylen Oral HistorySpecial Project 150 Stories for 150 Years. Several different interviewers, including staff and volunteers of the Joint Archives of Holland, with 170 different interviewees about their impressions of Holland, Michigan. Tracy Bednarick (1996) and Ann Paeth (1997) were the Summer Semester Student Coordinators. Interviews were transcribed through summer 1998. Also includes a paper written on the history of Holland for the past fifty years by Tracy Bednarick.HC 0252
Kathleen Verduin Oral HistorySpecial Project 150 Stories for 150 Years. Several different interviewers, including staff and volunteers of the Joint Archives of Holland, with 170 different interviewees about their impressions of Holland, Michigan. Tracy Bednarick (1996) and Ann Paeth (1997) were the Summer Semester Student Coordinators. Interviews were transcribed through summer 1998. Also includes a paper written on the history of Holland for the past fifty years by Tracy Bednarick.HC 0253
Jan Ver Helst Oral HistorySpecial Project 150 Stories for 150 Years. Several different interviewers, including staff and volunteers of the Joint Archives of Holland, with 170 different interviewees about their impressions of Holland, Michigan. Tracy Bednarick (1996) and Ann Paeth (1997) were the Summer Semester Student Coordinators. Interviews were transcribed through summer 1998. Also includes a paper written on the history of Holland for the past fifty years by Tracy Bednarick.HC 0254
Lydia Villagran Oral HistorySpecial Project 150 Stories for 150 Years. Several different interviewers, including staff and volunteers of the Joint Archives of Holland, with 170 different interviewees about their impressions of Holland, Michigan. Tracy Bednarick (1996) and Ann Paeth (1997) were the Summer Semester Student Coordinators. Interviews were transcribed through summer 1998. Also includes a paper written on the history of Holland for the past fifty years by Tracy Bednarick.HC 0255
Cora Visscher Oral HistorySpecial Project 150 Stories for 150 Years. Several different interviewers, including staff and volunteers of the Joint Archives of Holland, with 170 different interviewees about their impressions of Holland, Michigan. Tracy Bednarick (1996) and Ann Paeth (1997) were the Summer Semester Student Coordinators. Interviews were transcribed through summer 1998. Also includes a paper written on the history of Holland for the past fifty years by Tracy Bednarick.HC 0256
Bill Vogelzang Oral HistorySpecial Project 150 Stories for 150 Years. Several different interviewers, including staff and volunteers of the Joint Archives of Holland, with 170 different interviewees about their impressions of Holland, Michigan. Tracy Bednarick (1996) and Ann Paeth (1997) were the Summer Semester Student Coordinators. Interviews were transcribed through summer 1998. Also includes a paper written on the history of Holland for the past fifty years by Tracy Bednarick.HC 0257
Larry Wagenaar Oral HistorySpecial Project 150 Stories for 150 Years. Several different interviewers, including staff and volunteers of the Joint Archives of Holland, with 170 different interviewees about their impressions of Holland, Michigan. Tracy Bednarick (1996) and Ann Paeth (1997) were the Summer Semester Student Coordinators. Interviews were transcribed through summer 1998. Also includes a paper written on the history of Holland for the past fifty years by Tracy Bednarick.HC 0258
Earl Weener Oral HistorySpecial Project 150 Stories for 150 Years. Several different interviewers, including staff and volunteers of the Joint Archives of Holland, with 170 different interviewees about their impressions of Holland, Michigan. Tracy Bednarick (1996) and Ann Paeth (1997) were the Summer Semester Student Coordinators. Interviews were transcribed through summer 1998. Also includes a paper written on the history of Holland for the past fifty years by Tracy Bednarick.HC 0259
Theresa Weerstra Oral HistorySpecial Project 150 Stories for 150 Years. Several different interviewers, including staff and volunteers of the Joint Archives of Holland, with 170 different interviewees about their impressions of Holland, Michigan. Tracy Bednarick (1996) and Ann Paeth (1997) were the Summer Semester Student Coordinators. Interviews were transcribed through summer 1998. Also includes a paper written on the history of Holland for the past fifty years by Tracy Bednarick.HC 0260
Virgil White Oral HistorySpecial Project 150 Stories for 150 Years. Several different interviewers, including staff and volunteers of the Joint Archives of Holland, with 170 different interviewees about their impressions of Holland, Michigan. Tracy Bednarick (1996) and Ann Paeth (1997) were the Summer Semester Student Coordinators. Interviews were transcribed through summer 1998. Also includes a paper written on the history of Holland for the past fifty years by Tracy Bednarick.HC 0261
John Wiechertjes Oral HistorySpecial Project 150 Stories for 150 Years. Several different interviewers, including staff and volunteers of the Joint Archives of Holland, with 170 different interviewees about their impressions of Holland, Michigan. Tracy Bednarick (1996) and Ann Paeth (1997) were the Summer Semester Student Coordinators. Interviews were transcribed through summer 1998. Also includes a paper written on the history of Holland for the past fifty years by Tracy Bednarick.HC 0262
Alta Wilburn Oral HistorySpecial Project 150 Stories for 150 Years. Several different interviewers, including staff and volunteers of the Joint Archives of Holland, with 170 different interviewees about their impressions of Holland, Michigan. Tracy Bednarick (1996) and Ann Paeth (1997) were the Summer Semester Student Coordinators. Interviews were transcribed through summer 1998. Also includes a paper written on the history of Holland for the past fifty years by Tracy Bednarick.HC 0263
Dale Wyngarden Oral HistorySpecial Project 150 Stories for 150 Years. Several different interviewers, including staff and volunteers of the Joint Archives of Holland, with 170 different interviewees about their impressions of Holland, Michigan. Tracy Bednarick (1996) and Ann Paeth (1997) were the Summer Semester Student Coordinators. Interviews were transcribed through summer 1998. Also includes a paper written on the history of Holland for the past fifty years by Tracy Bednarick.HC 0264
Bruce Yam Oral HistorySpecial Project 150 Stories for 150 Years. Several different interviewers, including staff and volunteers of the Joint Archives of Holland, with 170 different interviewees about their impressions of Holland, Michigan. Tracy Bednarick (1996) and Ann Paeth (1997) were the Summer Semester Student Coordinators. Interviews were transcribed through summer 1998. Also includes a paper written on the history of Holland for the past fifty years by Tracy Bednarick.HC 0265
John Yelding Oral HistorySpecial Project 150 Stories for 150 Years. Several different interviewers, including staff and volunteers of the Joint Archives of Holland, with 170 different interviewees about their impressions of Holland, Michigan. Tracy Bednarick (1996) and Ann Paeth (1997) were the Summer Semester Student Coordinators. Interviews were transcribed through summer 1998. Also includes a paper written on the history of Holland for the past fifty years by Tracy Bednarick.HC 0266
Hope Religion Department InterviewsBrian Williams on the history of the Hope Religion department. Excerpts from college catalogs, interviews with religion department faculty, departmental requirements, chapel attendance controversy and information on key department membersHC 0267
Hope English Department InterviewsChristine Modey on the history of the Hope College English department. Excerpts from college catalog, interviews with English department faculty and information from other sourcesHC 0268
Andres Fierro Oral HistoryMember of the Holland Hispanic community.HC 0269
Frances Gamez Oral HistoryMember of the Holland Hispanic community.HC 0270
Alfredo Gonzales Oral HistoryMember of the Holland Hispanic community.HC 0271
Luciano Hernandez Oral HistoryMember of the Holland Hispanic community.HC 0272
Rebecca Loera Oral HistoryMember of the Holland Hispanic community.HC 0273
Rick Muniz Oral HistoryMember of the Holland Hispanic community.HC 0274
Randy Pacheco Oral HistoryMember of the Holland Hispanic community.HC 0275
Celestino Reyes Oral HistoryMember of the Holland Hispanic community.HC 0276
Lupita Reyes Oral HistoryMember of the Holland Hispanic community.HC 0277
Alberto Serrano Oral HistoryMember of the Holland Hispanic community.HC 0278
Teodoro Silva Oral HistoryMember of the Holland Hispanic community.HC 0279
Juan Sosa Oral HistoryMember of the Holland Hispanic community.HC 0280
Burton McRoy Oral HistoryLongtime resident of Macatawa Park.HC 0281
William Jesiek Oral HistoryLongtime resident of Macatawa Park.HC 0282
Lois Kayes Oral HistoryLongtime resident of Macatawa Park.HC 0283
Robert Evans Oral HistoryLongtime resident of Macatawa Park.HC 0284
Richard De Uyl Oral HistoryLongtime resident of Macatawa Park.HC 0285
J.M. Boshka Oral HistoryLongtime resident of Macatawa Park.HC 0286
Arthur Tazelaar Oral HistoryLongtime resident of Macatawa Park.HC 0287
Neal and Ann Berghoef Oral HistoryDutch Immigrant who emigrated to the United States after World War II.HC 0288
Tine Buursma Oral HistoryDutch Immigrant who emigrated to the United States after World War II.HC 0289
Jaap de Blecour Oral HistoryDutch Immigrant who emigrated to the United States after World War II.HC 0290
Case and Elsa Deventer Oral HistoryDutch Immigrant who emigrated to the United States after World War II.HC 0291
Fred and Helen Hoekstra Oral HistoryDutch Immigrant who emigrated to the United States after World War II.HC 0292
Harry and Corry Hoekstra Oral HistoryDutch Immigrant who emigrated to the United States after World War II.HC 0293
Margaret Kleis Oral HistoryDutch Immigrant who emigrated to the United States after World War II.HC 0294
John and Tina Muller Oral HistoryDutch Immigrant who emigrated to the United States after World War II.HC 0295
Neal and Mary Wagenaar Oral HistoryDutch Immigrant who emigrated to the United States after World War II.HC 0296
Hero Bratt Oral HistoryElderly Holland resident (non-immigrant).HC 0297
Marguerite Prins Oral HistoryElderly Holland resident (non-immigrant).HC 0298
Ray and Enriquetta Gutierrez Oral HistoryAndrea Peschiera with Hispanic residents of Holland. Includes questions asked and photographs.HC 0299
Jacobo Trevino Oral HistoryInterview is also with Crecenciana Robles de Trevino.HC 0300
Joseph and Lela Puente Oral HistoryAndrea Peschiera with Hispanic residents of Holland. Includes questions asked and photographs.HC 0301
Albino Rios Oral HistoryAndrea Peschiera with Hispanic residents of Holland. Includes questions asked and photographs.HC 0302
Lupita Reyes Oral HistoryAndrea Peschiera with Hispanic residents of Holland. Includes questions asked and photographs.HC 0303
Nereida Garcia Oral HistoryAndrea Peschiera with Hispanic residents of Holland. Includes questions asked and photographs.HC 0304
Jospephina Sosa Oral HistoryAndrea Peschiera with Hispanic residents of Holland. Includes questions asked and photographs.HC 0305
Enrique Sanchez Oral HistoryAndrea Peschiera with Hispanic residents of Holland. Includes questions asked and photographs.HC 0306
Kiyoko Dekker Oral HistoryJapanese resident of Holland.HC 0307
Leang Eap Oral HistoryCambodian resident of Holland.HC 0308
Wallace Fu Oral HistoryChinese resident of Holland.HC 0309
Eric Gray Oral HistoryAfrican-American resident of Holland.HC 0310
Young K. Oral HistoryKorean resident of Holland. Interviewed with Ben S. Hur.HC 0311
Pilkyu Kim Oral HistoryKorean resident of Holland.HC 0312
Thongwan LeaumChampassak Oral HistoryLaotian resident of Holland.HC 0313
Mary McIntosh Oral HistoryAmerican involved with the Vietnamese Community.HC 0314
Tung Nguyen Oral HistoryVietnamese resident of Holland.HC 0315
Ranong Silakhom Oral HistoryLaotian/Thai resident of Holland.HC 0316
Vongdeuane Singhanath Oral HistoryLaotian resident of Holland.HC 0317
Germaine Smith Oral HistoryAfrican-American resident of Holland.HC 0318
Kouy Tang Oral HistoryCambodian resident of Holland.HC 0319
Khon Tep Oral HistoryCambodian resident of Holland.HC 0320
Bich Thuy Tran Oral HistoryVietnamese resident of Holland.HC 0321
Binh Tran Oral HistoryVietnamese resident of Holland.HC 0322
Xuong Tran Oral HistoryVietnamese resident of Holland.HC 0323
Hollis Wells Oral HistoryAfrican-American resident of Holland.HC 0324
Ella Weymon Oral HistoryAfrican-American resident of Holland.HC 0325
Nell Wichers Oral HistoryJason Upchurch with individuals involved with Tulip Time. Collection also contains a research paper written by Jason Upchurch entitled "A Brief History of Tulip Time."HC 0326
Hattie Grigsby Oral HistoryJason Upchurch with individuals involved with Tulip Time.HC 0327
Jaap deBlecourt Oral HistoryJason Upchurch with individuals involved with Tulip Time.HC 0328
Kristi Van Howe Oral HistoryJason Upchurch with individuals involved with Tulip Time.HC 0329
John Karsten Oral HistoryJason Upchurch with individuals involved with Tulip Time.HC 0330
Dawn Bredeweg Oral HistoryJason Upchurch with individuals involved with Tulip Time.HC 0331
Margaret Van Vyven Oral HistoryJason Upchurch with individuals involved with Tulip Time.HC 0332
Larry Overbeek Oral HistoryJason Upchurch with individuals involved with Tulip Time.HC 0333
Andy Van Slot Oral HistoryJason Upchurch with individuals involved with Tulip Time.HC 0334
Barbara Appledorn Oral HistoryJason Upchurch with individuals involved with Tulip Time.HC 0335
Harry Hoekstra Oral HistoryJason Upchurch with individuals involved with Tulip Time.HC 0336
Mr.and Mrs. Marvin Freestone Oral HistoryJason Upchurch with individuals involved with Tulip Time.HC 0337
Beverly Harper Oral HistoryJason Upchurch with individuals involved with Tulip Time.HC 0338
Marilyn Kooiker Oral HistoryInterview is also with Ken Kooiker.HC 0339
Jack Leenhouts Oral HistoryInterview is also with Thelma Leenhouts.HC 0340
Steve Zwiep Oral HistoryJason Upchurch with individuals involved with Tulip Time.HC 0341
Louis Hallacy Oral HistoryJason Upchurch with individuals involved with Tulip Time.HC 0342
Sharon Koops Oral HistoryJason Upchurch with individuals involved with Tulip Time.HC 0343
Mary Duistermars Oral HistoryJason Upchurch with individuals involved with Tulip Time.HC 0344
Randy Water Oral HistoryJason Upchurch with individuals involved with Tulip Time.HC 0345
Roger Stroh Oral HistoryJason Upchurch with individuals involved with Tulip Time.HC 0346
Bill Rogers Oral HistoryJason Upchurch with individuals involved with Tulip Time.HC 0347
Marie Zingle Oral HistoryJason Upchurch with individuals involved with Tulip Time.HC 0348
John Boersma Oral HistoryHaworth, Inc.HC 0349
Clarence Boeve Oral HistoryHerman MillerHC 0350
Bradford T. Judson Oral HistoryBradford CompanyHC 0351
Linda Bruursema Oral HistoryOld Kent Bank-HollandHC 0352
William "Bill" Clay Oral HistoryLouis Padnos Iron and MetalHC 0353
Randall DePree Oral HistoryHeinze USA-HollandHC 0354
Gloria Gomez Oral HistoryHeinze USA-HollandHC 0355
G.W. Haworth Oral HistoryHaworth, Inc.HC 0356
Kristi Heyboer Oral HistoryHaworth, Inc.HC 0357
Davis Hippolito Oral HistoryLouis Padnos Iron and MetalHC 0358
JoAnn Jalving Oral HistoryBradford CompanyHC 0359
Maryam Komejan Oral HistoryDonnelly CorporationHC 0360
Seymour Padnos Oral HistoryLouis Padnos Iron and MetalHC 0361
Grace Piersma Oral HistoryOld Kent Bank-HollandHC 0362
Jerrald Redeker Oral HistoryOld Kent Bank-HollandHC 0363
Raymond Schaap Oral HistoryHerman MillerHC 0364
Jerry Shoup Oral HistoryHeinz USA-HollandHC 0365
Mary Jellema Oral HistoryRetired member of Hope College faculty.HC 0366
Judy Motiff Oral HistoryRetired member of Hope College faculty.HC 0367
Anthony Muiderman Oral HistoryRetired member of Hope College faculty.HC 0368
Nancy Nicodemus Oral HistoryRetired member of Hope College faculty.HC 0369
Robert Ritsema Oral HistoryRetired member of Hope College faculty.HC 0370
Elliot Tanis Oral HistoryRetired member of Hope College faculty.HC 0371
Rick Vandervelde Oral HistoryRetired member of Hope College faculty.HC 0372
Paul Van Faasen Oral HistoryRetired member of Hope College faculty.HC 0373
James Van Putten Oral HistoryRetired member of Hope College faculty.HC 0374
John Wilson Oral HistoryRetired member of Hope College faculty.HC 0375
Julius Becksvoort Oral HistoryJulius is a veteran. Interview is also with Sylvia BecksvoortHC 0376
Howard Deur Oral HistoryHoward is a veteran.HC 0377
Peter Douma Oral HistoryPeter is a veteran.HC 0378
Nelson Dykema Oral HistoryInterview is also with Caroline DykemaHC 0379
James Hoekstra Oral HistoryInterview is also with Grace Hoekstra.HC 0380
Eugen Kozak Oral HistoryEugen is a veteran.HC 0381
Milton Pike Oral HistoryMilton is a veteran. Interview is also with Laura-Lee PikeHC 0382
Lawrence Schipper Oral HistoryLawrence is a veteran. Interview is also with Jean SchipperHC 0383
Robert Snow Oral HistoryRobert is a veteran. Interview is also with Rita SnowHC 0384
John Steensma Oral HistoryInterview is also with Juliana Steensma.HC 0385
John Timmer Oral HistoryJohn is a veteran. Interview is also with Barbara Timmer.HC 0386
Lisa Bancuk Oral HistoryMatthew Nickel with current and past members of the Holland Police Department concerning the history of law enforcement in the City of Holland. Collection also includes newspaper articles, research material and slides.HC 0387
Richard Bonge Oral HistoryMatthew Nickel with current and past members of the Holland Police Department concerning the history of law enforcement in the City of Holland. Collection also includes newspaper articles, research material and slides.HC 0388
Burton Borr Oral HistoryMatthew Nickel with current and past members of the Holland Police Department concerning the history of law enforcement in the City of Holland. Collection also includes newspaper articles, research material and slides.HC 0389
Paul DeBoer Oral HistoryMatthew Nickel with current and past members of the Holland Police Department concerning the history of law enforcement in the City of Holland. Collection also includes newspaper articles, research material and slides.HC 0390
Robert DeVries Oral HistoryMatthew Nickel with current and past members of the Holland Police Department concerning the history of law enforcement in the City of Holland. Collection also includes newspaper articles, research material and slides.HC 0391
Dave Guikema Oral HistoryMatthew Nickel with current and past members of the Holland Police Department concerning the history of law enforcement in the City of Holland. Collection also includes newspaper articles, research material and slides.HC 0392
Russell Hopkins Oral HistoryMatthew Nickel with current and past members of the Holland Police Department concerning the history of law enforcement in the City of Holland. Collection also includes newspaper articles, research material and slides.HC 0393
John Kruithoff Oral HistoryMatthew Nickel with current and past members of the Holland Police Department concerning the history of law enforcement in the City of Holland. Collection also includes newspaper articles, research material and slides.HC 0394
Earl “Doc” Scholl Oral HistoryMatthew Nickel with current and past members of the Holland Police Department concerning the history of law enforcement in the City of Holland. Collection also includes newspaper articles, research material and slides.HC 0395
Drew Torres Oral HistoryMatthew Nickel with current and past members of the Holland Police Department concerning the history of law enforcement in the City of Holland. Collection also includes newspaper articles, research material and slides.HC 0396
Ollie Wierenga Oral HistoryMatthew Nickel with current and past members of the Holland Police Department concerning the history of law enforcement in the City of Holland. Collection also includes newspaper articles, research material and slides.HC 0397
William Bloemendaal Oral HistoryMatthew Nickel interviews with Holland, Michigan, polio survivors. Collection includes newspaper articles, photographs, research material and slides.HC 0398
Dr. Vern Boersma Oral HistoryMatthew Nickel interviews with Holland, Michigan, polio survivors. Collection includes newspaper articles, photographs, research material and slides.HC 0399
Melvin Budgell Oral HistoryMatthew Nickel interviews with Holland, Michigan, polio survivors. Collection includes newspaper articles, photographs, research material and slides.HC 0400
Rev. Dale Cooper Oral HistoryMatthew Nickel interviews with Holland, Michigan, polio survivors. Collection includes newspaper articles, photographs, research material and slides.HC 0401
Forrest Fynewever Oral HistoryMatthew Nickel interviews with Holland, Michigan, polio survivors. Collection includes newspaper articles, photographs, research material and slides.HC 0402
Ruth Fyneweaver Oral HistoryMatthew Nickel interviews with Holland, Michigan, polio survivors. Collection includes newspaper articles, photographs, research material and slides.HC 0403
Linda Gebben Oral HistoryMatthew Nickel interviews with Holland, Michigan, polio survivors. Collection includes newspaper articles, photographs, research material and slides.HC 0404
Katherine Lambers Oral HistoryMatthew Nickel interviews with Holland, Michigan, polio survivors. Collection includes newspaper articles, photographs, research material and slides.HC 0405
Jan Lozon Oral HistoryMatthew Nickel interviews with Holland, Michigan, polio survivors. Collection includes newspaper articles, photographs, research material and slides.HC 0406
Cherry Overway Oral HistoryMatthew Nickel interviews with Holland, Michigan, polio survivors. Collection includes newspaper articles, photographs, research material and slides.HC 0407
Sergio Pieksma-Delange Oral HistoryMatthew Nickel interviews with Holland, Michigan, polio survivors. Collection includes newspaper articles, photographs, research material and slides.HC 0408
Greg Shaw Oral HistoryMatthew Nickel interviews with Holland, Michigan, polio survivors. Collection includes newspaper articles, photographs, research material and slides.HC 0409
Edward Sjoerdsma Oral HistoryMatthew Nickel interviews with Holland, Michigan, polio survivors. Collection includes newspaper articles, photographs, research material and slides.HC 0410
Art Souter Oral HistoryMatthew Nickel interviews with Holland, Michigan, polio survivors. Collection includes newspaper articles, photographs, research material and slides.HC 0411
Ray and Doris Souter Oral HistoryMatthew Nickel interviews with Holland, Michigan, polio survivors. Collection includes newspaper articles, photographs, research material and slides.HC 0412
Ken Souter Oral HistoryMatthew Nickel interviews with Holland, Michigan, polio survivors. Collection includes newspaper articles, photographs, research material and slides.HC 0413
Gail Hering Oral HistoryRyan Harvey with Holland area business leaders who have utilized the Scanlon Plan, a form of management where all employees are encouraged to take a more active role in the company.HC 0414
Harold Streur Oral HistoryRyan Harvey with Holland area business leaders who have utilized the Scanlon Plan, a form of management where all employees are encouraged to take a more active role in the company.HC 0415
Patrick Thompson Oral HistoryRyan Harvey with Holland area business leaders who have utilized the Scanlon Plan, a form of management where all employees are encouraged to take a more active role in the company.HC 0416
Delores Slikkers Oral HistoryRyan Harvey with Holland area business leaders who have utilized the Scanlon Plan, a form of management where all employees are encouraged to take a more active role in the company.HC 0417
David Slikkers Oral HistoryRyan Harvey with Holland area business leaders who have utilized the Scanlon Plan, a form of management where all employees are encouraged to take a more active role in the company.HC 0418
Rob Sligh Oral HistoryRyan Harvey with Holland area business leaders who have utilized the Scanlon Plan, a form of management where all employees are encouraged to take a more active role in the company.HC 0419
Richard Ruch Oral HistoryRyan Harvey with Holland area business leaders who have utilized the Scanlon Plan, a form of management where all employees are encouraged to take a more active role in the company.HC 0420
Seymour Padnos Oral HistoryRyan Harvey with Holland area business leaders who have utilized the Scanlon Plan, a form of management where all employees are encouraged to take a more active role in the company.HC 0421
Lawrence Lee Oral HistoryRyan Harvey with Holland area business leaders who have utilized the Scanlon Plan, a form of management where all employees are encouraged to take a more active role in the company.HC 0422
Robert "Buzz" Kersman Oral HistoryRyan Harvey with Holland area business leaders who have utilized the Scanlon Plan, a form of management where all employees are encouraged to take a more active role in the company.HC 0423
G. Haworth Oral HistoryRyan Harvey with Holland area business leaders who have utilized the Scanlon Plan, a form of management where all employees are encouraged to take a more active role in the company.HC 0424
Louis Hallacy Oral HistoryRyan Harvey with Holland area business leaders who have utilized the Scanlon Plan, a form of management where all employees are encouraged to take a more active role in the company.HC 0425
Ron Griffith Oral HistoryRyan Harvey with Holland area business leaders who have utilized the Scanlon Plan, a form of management where all employees are encouraged to take a more active role in the company.HC 0426
Carl Frost Oral HistoryRyan Harvey with Holland area business leaders who have utilized the Scanlon Plan, a form of management where all employees are encouraged to take a more active role in the company.HC 0427
Bernard Donnelly Oral HistoryRyan Harvey with Holland area business leaders who have utilized the Scanlon Plan, a form of management where all employees are encouraged to take a more active role in the company.HC 0428
Gary DeWitt Oral HistoryRyan Harvey with Holland area business leaders who have utilized the Scanlon Plan, a form of management where all employees are encouraged to take a more active role in the company.HC 0429
Max DePree Oral HistoryRyan Harvey with Holland area business leaders who have utilized the Scanlon Plan, a form of management where all employees are encouraged to take a more active role in the company.HC 0430
Charles Conrad Oral HistoryRyan Harvey with Holland area business leaders who have utilized the Scanlon Plan, a form of management where all employees are encouraged to take a more active role in the company.HC 0431
James Brooks Oral HistoryRyan Harvey with Holland area business leaders who have utilized the Scanlon Plan, a form of management where all employees are encouraged to take a more active role in the company.HC 0432
Dwane Baumgardner Oral HistoryRyan Harvey with Holland area business leaders who have utilized the Scanlon Plan, a form of management where all employees are encouraged to take a more active role in the company.HC 0433
Fred Bauer Oral HistoryRyan Harvey with Holland area business leaders who have utilized the Scanlon Plan, a form of management where all employees are encouraged to take a more active role in the company.HC 0434
Eva Ackerman Oral HistoryAn interview with Eva Ackerman, a Holocaust survivor, conducted by Dr. Sidney Bolkosky, Professor of History at the University of Michigan--Dearborn. Eva Ackerman was born in Budapest, Hungary in 1926. Although an only child, Eva was part of a large extended family, most of whom perished during the war. Eva's parents divorced when she was young and she was raised by her mother. She had a reasonably normal childhood, even after the war began until the German annexation of Hungary in 1944. Eva was separated from her mother and marched to Zurndorf, Austria. She was put on a train to a labor camp in Landsberg from which she was eventually liberated. Her father perished in an air raid shortly before the end of the war and her mother died in Bergen-Belsenb12600611
Martin Adler Oral HistoryAn interview with Martin Adler, a Holocaust survivor, conducted by Dr. Sidney Bolkosky, Professor of History at the University of Michigan--Dearborn. Martin Adler was born in 1929 in Volové, a village in Subcarpathian Ruthania. He was the oldest child and had two brothers and a sister. His village was occupied by Hungarians in 1939 when he was ten years old. Martin's father was conscripted into a labor unit in Russia from 1941 until the end of 1942. Eventually the family lost their store due to the Jewish laws. The Germans occupied the area in March of 1944 and soon after the family was deported, first to a ghetto in Sokirnitsa and then to Auschwitz where his mother and siblings were gassed. Martin and his father were sent to Buchenwald and then to Dora where his father was killed. Martin was eventually liberated by the British from Bergen-Belsenb1234350x
Marton Adler Oral HistoryAn interview with Marton Adler, a Holocaust survivor, conducted by Dr. Sidney Bolkosky, Professor of History at the University of Michigan--Dearborn. Marton Adler was born in 1929 and lived in a Czechoslovakian town called Volové. When the war started, life did not change much for Marton until his father was sent to a labor camp for two years in 1941. In March of 1944 all the Jews of Volové were deported, first to a ghetto set up in Sokirnitsa, a nearby town, and then to Auschwitz. Marton and his father were the only members of his immediate family to survive Auschwitz. They were there for three days before being sent to Buchenwald and later to Dora concentration camp, where his father was killed. At Dora, Marton worked as a clothes sorter until the camp was evacuated to Bergen-Belsen where he was liberated by the British on April 15, 1945b12103901
Olga Adler Oral HistoryAn interview with Olga Adler, a Holocaust survivor, conducted by Jonathon Fishbane. Olga Adler was born in Beregszász Czechoslovakia. After the Hungarians invaded Czechoslovakia in 1938, Olga's parents sent her to Budapest where she worked as a clothing model until the Budapest Jews were rounded up and sent to concentration camps. Olga's life was spared after a failed escape attempt and she lived in several camps until she was sent back to the Budapest ghetto as a nurse to the elderly and insane who had been left there. Olga's immediate family, her father, mother, brother and sister, all perished in forced labor or death camps. Upon liberation, Olga returned to her hometown, got married, and soon left for the United States when the Russians took over their townb12830331
Irving Altus Oral HistoryAn interview with Irving Altus, a Holocaust survivor, conducted by Bernie Kent. Irving Altus was born in 1920 in Czekanów, Poland. He was the middle child in a family consisting of his parents and five children, all of whom perished in the Holocaust. Following the German invasion of Poland in 1939, the Germans arrested Irving and sent him to various labor camps throughout Europe, including one in Königsberg, Germany. In 1942, he was sent to Auschwitz-Birkenau and assigned to an external labor kommando approximately 50 miles from the main camp. In 1945, he participated in a forced march towards Germany, eventually ending up at Theresienstadt. He was there one day before being liberated by the Soviet army. After the war, Mr. Altus returned briefly to his hometown and then relocated to Munich, Germany. He emigrated to the United States with his wife and son in 1949b1261564x
Eugene Arden Oral HistoryAn interview with Eugene Arden conducted by Dr. Sidney , Professor of History at the University of Michigan--Dearborn. Eugene Arden was a corporal in the United States Army during World War II. His military government unit was attached to the U.S. 7th Army as it travelled into Germany. The unit was responsible for closing down Nazi labor camps and establishing DP (displaced persons) camps. The unit eventually helped liberate Landsberg, a sub-camp of Dachau. After the war ended, Eugene and his unit spent the post-war period in Heidelberg, Germanyb12615651
Peri Berki Oral HistoryAn interview with Peri Berki, a Holocaust survivor, conducted by an unidentified interviewer. Peri Berki was born in 1900 in Hungary. After her husband was deported to a labor camp and their farmland taken away, Peri and her son lived in a ghetto with her sister and at one point, with thirty-nine other people, in a one-bedroom apartment. With the help of her husband and a Gentile innkeeper, they obtained false papers, moved to the Hungarian countryside, and assumed Gentile identities. Throughout the war, they posed as Gentiles, avoiding detection and receiving help from several strangers. When the war ended, the family was reunited and they again obtained false papers to immigrate to the United Statesb12769113
Szymon Binke Oral HistoryAn interview with Szymon Binke, a Holocaust survivor, conducted by Dr. Sidney Bolkosky, Professor of History at the University of Michigan--Dearborn. Mr. Binke was born in 1931 in Lódz, Poland. Shortly after the Nazi invasion his family was moved to the city's Baluty district which became the Lódz ghetto. In 1944 the family was deported to Auschwitz-Birkenau where his mother and sister were gassed. Szymon was placed in the Kinderblock but escape from it to join his father and uncles in the main camp of Auschwitz. Later he was transferred to a series of forced labor camps until he was liberated in May 1945b12410603
Eva Boros Oral HistoryAn interview with Eva Boros, a Holocaust survivor, conducted by Kay Roth. Eva was born in Bratislava, Czechoslovakia in 1932. After the German annexation of the area, Eva's father began sending her siblings to Budapest, Hungary. Eva was smuggled there in 1944 however, the German invasion of that country prompted her to return to Bratislava. In September 1944, Eva was sent to the countryside surrounding Bratislava in order to go into hiding. Following the end of the war, Eva immigrated to Israel and then to the United States in 1969b12713867
Larry Brenner Oral HistoryAn interview with Larry Brenner, a Holocaust survivor, conducted by Dr. Sidney Bolkosky, Professor of History at the University of Michigan--Dearborn. Larry Brenner was born in Vásárosnamény, Hungary in 1924. With the outbreak of the war, his father was sent to a forced labor camp and Larry went to live in Budapest to help an aunt run her business. In 1944, Larry was deported to a forced labor camp in Jászberény, the first of several forced labor camps to which he was sent. Larry was liberated from Gunskirchen, a subcamp of Mauthausen, and after liberation, he spent the next several years finding surviving family members and dodging the Hungarian Army draft. In 1948, Larry immigrated to Americab12861194
Irene Butter Oral HistoryAn interview with Dr. Irene Hasenberg Butter, a Holocaust survivor, conducted by Dr. Sidney Bolkosky, Professor of History at the University of Michigan--Dearborn. Dr. Butter was born in Berlin in 1930 but moved to Holland with her family in 1937. In June 1943 the family was deported, first to Westerbork, a transit camp, and then in Feb. 1944 to Bergen-Belsen. The family managed to be included in an exchange transport in early 1945, using falsified Equadorian passports. During the transport her father died. The rest of the family were released and went to North Africa and later moved to New York City after the war endedb12043722
Bella Camhi Oral HistoryAn interview with Bella Camhi, a Holocaust survivor, conducted by Dr. Sidney Bolkosky, Professor of History at the University of Michigan--Dearborn. Bella Camhi was born in Salonika, Greece, ca. 1925. Following the German occupation of Greece, Bella, along with her mother, father and three sisters, was placed in the Salonika Ghetto. In 1943, the family was deported to Auschwitz-Birkenau where everyone, except Bella and another sister, was gassed on arrival. Bella was assigned to work in the Kanada Kommando and her younger sister was placed in the Kinderblock, from where she was later sent to the gas chambers. Sometime in 1944, Bella was moved out of Auschwitz-Birkenau, loaded onto a wagon and later abandoned in an empty field. After being liberated, Bella walked to Munich, Germany. She later returned to Salonika and finally immigrated to the United States sometime in the early 1950sb1267655x
Franka Charlupski Oral HistoryAn interview with Franka Weintraub Charlupski, a Holocaust survivor, conducted by Dr. Sidney Bolkosky, Professor of History at the University of Michigan--Dearborn. Mrs. Charlupski was born in 1920 and lived with her family in Lódz, Poland. The Weintraubs were in the Lódz ghetto from 1940 until August 1944 when they were transported to Auschwitz and separated. Her mother died in Auschwitz and her father died in a labor camp. Franka and her sister spent three days in Auschwitz before being moved to a labor camp outside of Bremen, Germany. On April 7, 1945 this camp was closed and the inmates were moved to Bergen-Belsen where they were liberated by the British Army on April 15b12069024
Eva Cigler Oral HistoryAn interview with Eva Cigler, a Holocaust survivor, conducted by Eva Lipton. Eva Cigler was born in Beregszász, Czechoslovakia in 1926. After the Hungarian annexation of the area, Eva's family, consisting of her mother, father, four sisters and one brother, experienced increasing anti-Semitism from the Hungarians. In 1944, the family was deported to Auschwitz-Birkenau where her mother, father, brother, and one sister were gassed. After some time in Auschwitz-Birkenau, Eva was transported to an unspecified satellite camp of Auschwitz-Birkenau. From there she was sent to Bergen-Belsen where she was liberated. After spending some time in a Displaced Persons Camp in Celle, Germany, Eva returned to Beregszász for a brief time. From there she went to Prague and immigrated to the United Statesb1271186x
Barbara Cohen Oral HistoryAn interview with Barbara Schechter Cohen, a Holocaust survivor, conducted by Dr. Sidney Bolkosky, Professor of History at the University of Michigan--Dearborn. Mrs. Cohen, born in 1941, is a child survivor of the Holocaust. Following the outbreak of the war, Barbara and her mother were separated from her father. Traveling on forged papers, Barbara and her mother went to Austria, where her mother worked as a farm hand part of the time. An Austrian woman took Barbara in for a time. Towards the end of the war, Barbara's mother suspected that the woman wanted to keep the child so on her last visit, she ran away with Barbara. At the conclusion of the war the two were placed in a displaced person (DP) camp outside Stuttgart Germany, where they were reunited with Barbara's father. The family immigrated to the United States in 1946b12628311
Regina Cohen Oral HistoryAn interview with Regina Cohen, a Holocaust survivor, conducted by Dr. Sidney Bolkosky, Professor of History at the University of Michigan--Dearborn. Regina Cohen was born in Chust, Czechoslovakia in 1929. She was the fifth child of nine in a middle class Orthodox family. She and her family were sent to the ghetto in Chust and then were deported to Auschwitz in spring 1944. After a few months, she was selected to work in a Siemens factory near Nuremberg. She was then moved to a factory in Nuremberg where the American Army liberated her. Regina went home to Chust to find her only surviving family, one sister and one brother. Regina and her sister moved out of Russian occupied Czechoslovakia into a DP camp in Heidenheim, Germany where they stayed for three years. Regina continued her education in the DP camp and learned English in order to move to Montreal to be a mother's helper for a Jewish family. She met her husband in Windsor and soon moved to Detroit to start her familyb12848050
Simon Cymerath Oral HistoryAn interview with Simon Cymerath, a Holocaust survivor, conducted by Dr. Sidney Bolkosky, Professor of History at the University of Michigan--Dearborn. Simon Cymerath grew up in a close-knit family in Starowice [Starowicea], Poland. When the Germans first occupied Starowice, the family was moved into a ghetto and Simon was first sent to work in a local factory and then to work in a forced labor camp. Simon escaped from the labor camp with the help of a Jewish contractor and returned home to Starowice where he went back to work in the factory. Soon after, the family was sent to Treblinka where Simon's parents and youngest brother perished Simon and two other brothers were separated and sent to Auschwitz. Simon survived Auschwitz working as a painter on a Monowitz work detail. In April 1945, the camp was evacuated and the prisoners forced on a death march that ended with their liberation by the Americans. After liberation, Simon worked several years with the American army, reunited with his surviving brother, and immigrated to the United States in 1950b1282561x
Bert Dan Oral HistoryAn interview with Bert Dan, a Holocaust survivor, conducted by Kay Roth. Bert Dan was born in Cluj, Romania in 1916. He served as a soldier in the Romanian army at the outbreak of World War II. After the Hungarians occupied Romania, he was arrested and imprisoned for a year upon his release Bert was drafted into various labor camps and work details throughout Eastern Europe. During a forced march back to Hungary, he escaped with a group of other prisoners and was found by the Russian army. He was freed and eventually returned to Cluj. Bert began to work with Jewish committees helping to locate and assist Hungarian and Romanian Jews returning to their homes from Poland. He eventually set up a committee office in Prague, Czechoslovakia where he was reunited with his fiancée. They married after the end of the war and immigrated to the United States in 1949b12857397
Clara Dan Oral HistoryAn interview with Clara Dan, a Holocaust survivor, conducted by Dr. Sidney Bolkosky, Professor of History at the University of Michigan--Dearborn. Clara Dan was born in Tîrgu-Mures, Romania (later Hungary) in 1921. Clara was the youngest of three siblings. In the spring of 1944, Clara, her sister and her parents were rounded up and placed in a makeshift ghetto in Koloszvar, Hungary. After several weeks there, they were shipped to Auschwitz-Birkenau. Clara and her sister survived the selection on the ramp and were reunited in the camp. After some time in Auschwitz, Clara and her sister were sent to work in a bullet factory in Hundsfeld. When the Russians came too close to the area, the sisters were marched to Gross Rosen and then sent to Bergen-Belsen where the British Army liberated them. After the war, Clara and her sister were placed in a DP camp in Celle, Germany where they were reunited with their brotherb12777262
Lila Denes Oral HistoryAn interview with Lila Denes, a Holocaust survivor, conducted by Dr. Sidney Bolkosky, Professor of History at the University of Michigan--Dearborn. Born in a small town in Hungary, Mrs. Denes moved to Budapest in 1940 with her husband. Her husband was taken to labor camps several times between 1940 and the end of the war. When the Germans occupied Budapest in 1944, Mrs. Denes had two small children, Judy and George. Using false papers, she assumed the identity of an unwed mother and was treated as such by the people around her. She was in Budapest when the Soviet army liberated it. Her husband returned soon after the liberation. Again using false papers, the family fled Hungary after the war and eventually settled in Detroit, Michigan in 1955b12213160
Henry Dorfman Oral HistoryAn interview with Henry Dorfman, a Holocaust survivor, conducted by Dr. Sidney Bolkosky, Professor of History at the University of Michigan--Dearborn. Born in Glowaczow, Poland in 1922, Henry Dorfman was one of four children in a large Orthodox family. Following the German invasion of Poland in September 1939, the Dorfman family continued to live in Glowaczow under an increasing amount of persecution from the Nazi occupation forces. The family was relocated to a large ghetto in Kozienice in 1941. While in the ghetto, Henry and his father were separated from his mother and three siblings and used as laborers on the estate of a Volksdeutsche (native German) aristocrat. Sometime in the fall of 1942, the entire Dorfman family was rounded-up and put on a transport to the Treblinka death camp. Once again, separated from his mother and siblings, Henry and his father escaped from the train. His mother and siblings died en route to, or immediately upon arrival at Treblinka. Following their escape, Henry and his father hid in a barn and were given assistance by one of the workers employed by the Volksdeutsche aristocrat. Later they served in a partisan unit until the area was liberated by the Soviet Army in 1944. Henry remained in Europe for several years following the end of the war, helping his father establish two businesses in Lodz, Poland and establishing his own in Germany. He later moved to the United States with his wife, Mala, whom he met in Poland after the warb12576700
Mala Dorfman Oral HistoryAn interview with Mala Weintraub Dorfman, a Holocaust survivor, conducted by Dr. Sidney Bolkosky, Professor of History at the University of Michigan--Dearborn. Mala Weintraub Dorfman was born in Lódz, Poland in 1923. When the war broke out in 1939, Mala and three of her five siblings were sent to live with their grandmother in the Kozienice ghetto. Mala worked as a nurse in the ghetto until she was deported to Skarzysko where she worked in an ammunitions factory for two years. She was deported to Czestochowa where she was liberated a year later by the Russians. After the war, Mala returned to Lódz, married and was reunited with her sisters in Marburg an der Lahn, Germany. Mala lived with her husband in Germany until heir immigration to the United States in 1949b12854487
Noemi Ebenstein Oral HistoryAn interview with Noemi Engel Ebenstein, a Holocaust survivor, conducted by Dr. Sidney Bolkosky, Professor of History at the University of Michigan--Dearborn. Mrs. Ebenstein, born in 1941, is a child survivor of the Holocaust. In her interview she retells stories told to her by her mother about how the family survived the Holocaust. Her father was sent to a forced labor camp when Noemi was a baby. In May 1944, Noemi, her brother and mother were deported from Subotica, Yugoslavia to the camps, first to Strasshof labor and then to Moosbierbaum where they were liberated by the Soviet armyb12269608
Alexander Ehrmann Oral HistoryAn interview with Alexander Ehrmann, a Holocaust survivor, conducted by Dr. Sidney Bolkosky, Professor of History at the University of Michigan--Dearborn. Alexander Ehrmann was born in Kralovsky Chlumec, Czechoslovakia, which became part of Hungary in 1938. His family consisted of himself, his parents, two brothers and three sisters. In 1944 the family was deported to a ghetto and then to Auschwitz where his parents, a sister and her son were killed. After the uprising in the Warsaw ghetto ended, Mr. Ehrmann was transferred from Auschwitz to Warsaw with a labor group to salvage materials from the ghetto. After spending five days in Dachau, he was transferred to Muhldorf, where the inmates were building an underground aircraft factory. When the camp was evacuated, Mr. Ehrmann and other inmates were put on a train and moved back and forth in the unoccupied area until they were liberated by American troops. After the war he was reunited with two sisters and his younger brotherb12089308
Anne Eisenberg Oral HistoryAn interview with Anne Eisenberg, a Holocaust survivor, conducted by Charlene Green. Anne Eisenberg was born in Slatinske Doly, in Czechoslovakia. As a child, she and her family moved to Sighet. Following the Hungarian annexation of Sighet, Anne's father and brothers were conscripted by Hungarian authorities and sent away for forced labor. In 1944, Anne, along with her sisters, mother and aunt were placed in the ghetto in Sighet and then deported to Auschwitz-Birkenau, where only Anne and one sister survived. They were then shipped to the forced labor camp Gelsenkirchen and then to Sömmerda. They were liberated near Brno, Czechoslovakia in 1945. Anne was then placed in a DP camp near Linz, Austria. Following a return to Sighet, she immigrated to the United Statesb12766938
Luba Elbaum Oral HistoryAn interview with Luba Elbaum, a Holocaust survivor, conducted by Arthur Kirsch. Luba Elbaum was born on Jan. 10, 1923 in Lublin, Poland. When the war broke out, she worked with her family for the Germans. While her family was taken to the ghettos in Lublin and Belzyce, Luba worked on a farm for the Germans. In 1941 she was deported to Budzyn to be a housemaid for the Oberscharführer Felix. A year later, Luba was deported to Plaszów for work detail, then to Auschwitz. In 1944, she was transported to Bergen-Belsen where she was selected along with 300 other girls to be deported to Aschersleben to work. Luba was then forced on a six-week death march to Theresienstadt in Czechoslovakia where she was liberated on May 8, 1945b12903814
Isaac Engel Oral HistoryAn interview with Isaac Engel, a Holocaust survivor, conducted by Dr. Sidney Bolkosky, Professor of History at the University of Michigan--Dearborn. Isaac Engel was born in Zwolén, Poland ca. 1921. Following the German invasion in 1939, Isaac and his family hid from the Germans in the village of Zileonka. Shortly thereafter, the family separated and Isaac moved between local villages. In 1942, Isaac's family left hiding and went to the town of Ciepielów where they were rounded-up by the Germans and either killed on the spot or deported to Treblinka. Isaac was sent to Skarzysko-Kamienna as a forced laborer for the Hugo Schneider Aktiengesellschaft (HASAG). From Skarzysko-Kamienna, Isaac was sent to Gross-Rosen, Nordhausen, Dora and Bergen-Belsen. After liberation, Isaac was placed in the displaced persons (DP) camp at Celle, where he remained until 1949b12651552
Eugene Feldman Oral HistoryAn interview with Eugene Feldman, a Holocaust survivor, conducted by Dr. Sidney Bolkosky, Professor of History at the University of Michigan--Dearborn. Eugene Feldman was born in the late 1920s in Glinka, Poland. Situated in the Soviet zone of occupation after 1939, Glinka was under Soviet rule until 1941. Following the German invasion of the Soviet Union, Eugene and his family were sent to the nearby ghetto in Stolin. During an Aktion, Eugene, his father, stepmother, and cousin hid from the Germans, escaped from the ghetto and returned to Glinka. They left the village and hid in the countryside, following a band of partisans through White Russia (Belarus). After the war, Eugene went to Lódz, Poland and then on to a DP camp in Freimann, Germany. From there he immigrated to the United Statesb12694927
Manya Feldman Oral HistoryAn interview with Manya Auster Feldman, a Holocaust survivor, conducted by Dr. Sidney Bolkosky, Professor of History at the University of Michigan-Dearborn. Manya was born in Dombrovitsa, Poland in 1923. Her family was Orthodox and considerably large, numbering close to 200. Following the outbreak of the war in 1939, the Soviet Union occupied Dombrovitsa. Russian occupation ended in 1941 with the German invasion of the Soviet Union and Manya's hometown fell into German hands. The Jews immediately felt the effects of German anti-Semitic measures. In August 1942, the Germans liquidated the ghetto in Dombrovitsa and Manya, along with her father, brother and eldest sister escaped into the forest. Her mother and two other sisters remained and were deported to the nearby town of Sarny where they were murdered. After fleeing the Germans, Manya and her remaining family joined the Kovpak partisan movement. Manya was separated from her father and siblings and spent the remainder of the war hiding in several small villages in the region and serving in different partisan units. Her father and siblings were killed in combat. Following the end of the war, Manya was placed in a DP camp in Berlin. She then emigrated to the United Statesb12554844
Lily Fenster Oral HistoryAn interview with Lily Fenster, a Holocaust survivor, conducted by Dr. Sidney Bolkosky, Professor of History at the University of Michigan--Dearborn. Lily Fenster was born in Warsaw, Poland in 1926. After the German invasion of Poland, Lily, along with her mother, father and five sisters, was placed in the Warsaw Ghetto. After some time, Lily was able to escape from the ghetto, leaving her family behind. In the ghetto, her four sisters died from hunger and her father disappeared. After making her way to Luków Podlaski, Lily was able to work on a farm and raised enough money to have her mother smuggled out of the ghetto. Within six weeks of the reunion, Lily's mother was deported to Treblinka where she died. Lily, having obtained a Kennkarte, and hiding among the gentile population, was able to evade capture. After her mother's deportation, Lily moved into the main city of Luków Podlaski, where she obtained work as a nurse until the Russian liberation. While in Luków Podlaski she met her future husband. After the war, Lily made her way to Lódz and then on to Germany. She emigrated to the United States in 1951b12651564
Fred Ferber Oral HistoryAn interview with Fred Ferber, a Holocaust survivor, conducted by Dr. Sidney Bolkosky, Professor of History at the University of Michigan-Dearborn. Mr. Ferber was born in 1930 in Swietchlowice, Poland. In 1933, the Ferber family re-located to Chorzów, Poland and then to Kraków, Poland, ca. 1936. Following the German invasion, the Ferbers were forced into the Kraków Ghetto located in Podgórze. In 1943, the family was rounded-up and sent to the Plaszów forced labor camp. While in Plaszów, Fred's father was murdered by the camp's Kommandant, Amon Goethe. Fred worked in the metal and fabric shops in the camp while his mother worked in a labor detail. Fred's brother was deported to Auschwitz-Birkenau where he died. Fred was separated from his mother when he was transferred with a number of other prisoners to the Mauthausen forced labor camp in Austria. From there, Fred was transferred to Gusen II and then to Gunskirchen (both sub-camps of Mauthausen). He was liberated by the American Army in May 1945. Following liberation and a short stay in a DP camp where he recuperated from typhus and dysentery, Fred returned to Poland to find his family. He was reunited with his mother in Sopot, Poland. He moved around Europe until the late 1940s, when he emigrated to America. In the United States, he stayed in an orphanage in San Francisco, while attending school and collegeb12537731
Miriam Ferber Oral HistoryAn interview with Miriam Monczyk-Laczkowska Ferber, a Holocaust survivor, conducted by Dr. Sidney Bolkosky, Professor of History at the University of Michigan--Dearborn. Soon after Miriam's birth in 1942 in Sosnowiec, Poland, the Monczyk family was moved to the Srodula ghetto on the outskirts of the city. Miriam's mother asked the Laczkowskas, a Polish family who were former neighbors and friends, to take care of the infant Miriam until her mother could return for her. The Laczkowskas agreed and smuggled Miriam out of the ghetto. The Nazis murdered Miriam's father in the ghetto. Her mother and brother were deported to a death camp sometime later and never returned for her. Miriam spent the remainder of the war in the care of the Laczkowskas. She was portrayed by the family as the illegitimate daughter of the oldest Laczkowska daughter and was raised as a Polish Catholic. Near the end of the war, Mr. Laczkowska was deported to Gusen, a sub-camp of Mauthausen, where he died of typhus. Following the war, Miriam continued her life as a Polish Catholic. While still a teenager, Miriam found out about her Jewish background. As part of a program developed by the Lubavitcher Rebbe to bring European Jews to America, Miriam was separated from her foster family and brought to Americab12537743
Charlotte Firestone Oral HistoryAn interview with Charlotte Firestone, a Holocaust survivor, conducted by Dr. Sidney Bolkosky, Professor of History at the University of Michigan-Dearborn. Mrs. Firestone, born in Munkacs, Czechoslovakia, relates her experiences in Czechoslovakia and Poland before, during and after the war. Prior to the birth of her son in August 1942, her husband was taken to the Soviet Union where he was imprisoned and remained throughout the war. Mrs. Firestone and her son moved in with her parents. After the German occupation of Munkacs in 1944, they were rounded up and deported to Auschwitz-Birkenau, where her mother and son were gassed upon arrival. After a short time in Birkenau, Mrs. Firestone and her sister were sent to Stutthof, another concentration camp in Poland, then they were relocated to Praust, a sub-camp. While in Stutthof, Mrs. Firestone was made a Stubälteste and in that capacity, served as a senior inmate in charge of the barrack. After spending six months in Praust, the sisters were evacuated. While on the march west, they managed to escape, evading capture by posing as Hungarian nurses. Later she was reunited with her husband and emigrated to the United States in 1955b12543342
Nancy Furdonski Oral HistoryAn interview with Nancy Furdonski, a Holocaust survivor, conducted by Charlene Green. Nancy Furdonski was born in Zlozew, Poland. Following the Nazi invasion of Poland, Nancy, along with her mother, father and several siblings, fled to the nearby town of Zduńska Wola, where Nancy's two older sisters lived. Following a brief stay there, Nancy, along with one sister and brother, went to stay with their grandmother in Szadek, Poland. After some time, Nancy and her family returned to Zdunska Wola where they remained in the ghetto until 1942. When the Germans liquidated the Zdunska Wola ghetto in 1942, Nancy and two sisters were sent to the Lodz Ghetto and many of her other family members were deported and murdered. Following the liquidation of the Lodz Ghetto, Nancy and her sisters were sent to Auschwitz-Birkenau. After a brief time, they were shipped to Stutthof, where her older sister perished, and then to Dresden. Following the bombings of that city, Nancy and her sister were sent on a forced march to Theresienstadt. During the march, they escaped and hid on a farm near Karlsbad (Karlovy Vary) where they were liberated by the American army. After a brief return to Poland, Nancy immigrated to America. Of her nine siblings, only a sister and a brother survivedb12680898
Hilma Geffen Oral HistoryAn interview with Hilma Geffen, a Holocaust survivor, conducted by Dr. Jon Fishbane. Hilma Geffen was born in Berlin in 1925 and was an only child. Her father served in the German Army during World War I and was awarded the Iron Cross. In 1931 the family moved to Rangsdorf, a suburb of Berlin, where they were the only Jewish family in town. Her father, an accountant, continued to commute to Berlin for work. A couple of nights after Kristallnacht in 1938, SA men came to the house and smashed the furniture. In 1939 the family moved back to Berlin because Jews could no longer own property. As Hilma was returning home after work in October 1941, her mother told her to run away because people were there to pick them up. Using false papers, Hilma went underground, living with a German couple who knew only that she was Jewish. She remained hidden with them until the end of the war, then moved to Miami Beach where she had relatives. Her parents were deported to Auschwitz and did not survive the warb1208928x
Vera Gissing Oral HistoryAn interview with Vera Gissing, a Holocaust survivor, conducted by Dr. Sidney Bolkosky, Professor of History at the University of Michigan--Dearborn. Vera Gissing was born in Prague, Czechoslovakia in 1928. She lived in Celakovice, outside of Prague, with her mother, father, and sister, Eva. After the Germans invaded their town, Vera's mother contacted Nicholas Winton about having the girls sent to England. Vera and her sister left Czechoslovakia in July 1939 and were put into foster care with two separate families. Vera stayed with the Rainfords, a poor Christian family, before enrolling in a Czech refugee school in England where she spent the duration of the war. After the war, Vera went back to Prague to study and became a literary translator but eventually moved back to England. While being interviewed by the Welsh BBC, Vera revealed her diaries that she kept of her experience during the war and decided to translate and publish the entries in the book Pearls of Childhood.b12922031
Simon Goldman Oral HistoryAn interview with Simon Goldman, a Holocaust survivor, conducted by Dr. Sidney Bolkosky, Professor of History at the University of Michigan--Dearborn. Simon Goldman was born in Lódz, Poland and had three brothers and a sister. His father owned a moving business while his mother stayed at home. Shortly after the German occupation of Lódz, his mother passed away and his father moved the family to a small town near Czestochowa, Poland. There the family moved into a relative's house and Simon and his brother worked in a bakery. Around 1942, Simon passed himself off as a Polish orphan to obtain work at a farm where he stayed incognito for the duration of the war until the area was liberated in 1945. After the war he went back to Lódz looking for his brother and other family members. He got into trouble with the police for being involved with the Lódz black market. Simon then decided to go to Linz, Austria to find a cousin. Simon was detained for not having papers, but made it to Linz on Yom Kippur and found his cousin at the DP camp. Simon was eventually arrested by the CIA for being involved in another black market in the DP camp but he was released after thirty days. Upon his release, Simon registered with the U.S. Committee to move to America. He was sent to New York in December 1946 and later the Jewish Health System set him up with a family in Detroitb12896895
Erna Gorman Oral HistoryAn interview with Erna Blitzer Gorman, a Holocaust survivor, conducted by Dr. Sidney Bolkosky, Professor of History at the University of Michigan--Dearborn. She relates her experiences as a child when she and her family were in Poland at the time of the Nazi invasion and were unable to return to their home in France. After living in various ghettos, they escaped and were hidden for more than two years in a barn by a Ukrainian farmer until the area was liberated by Russian soldiersb12017747
Emerich Grinbaum Oral HistoryAn interview with Emerich Grinbaum, a Holocaust survivor, conducted by Dr. Sidney Bolkosky, Professor of History at the University of Michigan--Dearborn. Mr. Grinbaum was born in Munkacs, Czechoslovakia in 1930. After the Hungarian annexation of Munkacs in 1938, Emerich, along with his father, mother and brother experienced increased anti-Semitism under the Hungarians. In 1944, Germany invaded Hungary and the Grinbaum family was deported to Auschwitz-Birkenau. Emerich's mother was gassed upon arrival and after less than a week in Birkenau, Emerich, his father and brother were shipped to a labor camp just outside of Warsaw, Poland. In August, 1944, the three were sent to Dachau. In Dachau, Emerich's father became ill and was sent to the camp hospital. During this period, Emerich and his brother were sent to one of Dachau's satellite camps, Allach. In Allach, Emerich worked on several labor Kommandos, including the BMW factory and as a potato peeler in the camp kitchen. While in Allach, Emerich's father was reunited with him and his brother and placed in a block for elderly people. In April 1945, the three were placed aboard a train and shipped to an unknown destination. While en route, the Germans abandoned the train and the three walked to a nearby village where they were liberated by the American Army. After liberation, they returned to Munkacs, now under Soviet rule as part of the Ukraine. Mr. Grinbaum studied medicine under the Soviets. He immigrated to the United States in the 1960sb12628323
Joseph Gringlas Oral HistoryAn interview with Joseph Gringlas, a Holocaust survivor, conducted by Dr. Sidney Bolkosky, Professor of History at the University of Michigan--Dearborn. Joseph Gringlas was born in Ostrowiec, Poland. Following the German invasion, he was separated from his family and transported to a labor camp in Blizyn, Poland. After approximately one year, Joseph was transferred first to Auschwitz-Birkenau and then to the sub-camp, Monowitz, where he was reunited with his brother. In 1945, the camp was liquidated and the brothers were sent on a forced march to Gleiwitz and then on to Dora-Nordhausen, where they were liberated. After the war, he spent several years in Landsberg, Germany, emigrating to the United States in 1951b12562634
Jack Gun Oral HistoryAn interview with Jack Gun, a Holocaust survivor, conducted by Dr. Sidney Bolkosky, Professor of History at the University of Michigan--Dearborn. Jack Gun was born in Rozhishche, Poland, where he lived with his father, mother and older brother and sister. Rozhishche was later annexed into the Ukraine by the Soviets at the outbreak of the war in September 1939. With the German invasion of the Soviet Union in June 1941, the Gun family was forced to move into a make-shift ghetto in the city where they were used as forced laborers. In August of 1942, the ghetto was liquidated by the Germans and Jack's father, mother and sister were killed. Jack and his brother managed to flee and received help from their father's non-Jewish friend. Upon this man's urging, Jack and his brother hid first in the woods and then in a bunker they dug in a field. After several near-misses with the occupation authorities, the two were hidden in a non-Jewish Ukrainian household where they remained until the Russians liberated the Ukraine in 1944b1257434x
Werner Hasenberg Oral HistoryAn interview with Werner Hasenberg, a Holocaust survivor, conducted by Dr. Sidney Bolkosky, Professor of History at the University of Michigan--Dearborn. Mr. Hasenberg was born in Germany and relates his experiences growing up under the Nazi regime until his family moved to Amsterdam, Holland in 1937. In June of 1943 the family was deported to Westerbork, a transit camp, and then to Bergen-Belsen in Feb. 1944. The family managed to be included in an exchange transport in Jan. 1945 using Ecuadorian papers made available by a family friend in Sweden. During the transport, Mr. Hasenberg's father died. After arriving in Switzerland, the rest of the family were released and briefly separated until they were reunited in New York in 1946b12407550
Abraham Holcman Oral HistoryAn interview with Abraham Holcman, a Holocaust survivor, conducted by Larry Berg. Abraham Holcman was born in 1925 in Lódz Poland. After the Nazi invasion, his family was moved into the Lódz ghetto where his father died of starvation. Abraham worked in a factory until 1944 when the family was deported to Auschwitz. Several weeks later, Abraham and his mother were sent to Görlitz where they were liberated in 1945. Abraham spent some time in a DP camp in Frankfurt and reunited with his sister in Sweden. In 1953, he immigrated to the United Statesb12837489
Esther Icikson Oral HistoryAn interview with Esther Feldman Icikson, a Holocaust survivor, conducted by Dr. Sidney Bolkosky, Professor of History at the University of Michigan--Dearborn. Mrs. Feldman Icikson was born in Chelm, Poland around 1935. After the German invasion in 1939, the family was sent to several different cities in the Ukraine and White Russia, including Opalin, Lebivne and Giesen. At this time, her father and uncle were arrested by the authorities and shipped to a prison in Asino, Siberia. Esther, her mother and two sisters were sent farther east to Sibiryak. When Germany invaded the Soviet Union in 1941, Esther's father and uncle were released under a general amnesty. The family was reunited in Asino after Esther's mother took the family back to Asino via a homemade raft. At the end of 1942, the family was resettled in Kyrgyzstan where they remained until the end of the war in 1945. Following the end of the war, the family returned to Chelm and then moved to a DP (displaced persons) camp in Ulm, Germany. From there they made their way to Israel where they lived in Lut. Esther immigrated to the United States in 1958b12651576
Lanka Ilkow Oral HistoryAn interview with Lanka Ilkow, a Holocaust survivor, conducted by Dr. Sidney Bolkosky, Professor of History at the University of Michigan--Dearborn. Lanka Ilkow was born in Novoseliza, Czechoslovakia (Ukraine) in 1920. Following the Hungarian annexation of parts of Slovakia, she and her family lived under Hungarian rule. In 1944, the family was shipped to a ghetto in Ungvar. From there they were sent to Auschwitz-Birkenau where her father was gassed upon arrival. While in Auschwitz, Lanka's mother was later selected for extermination and Lanka and her sister were sent to the forced labor camp Hundsfeld, near Breslau. From there they were shipped to Gross Rosen, Mauthausen and finally, Bergen-Belsen, where the British army liberated themb12676354
David Kahan Oral HistoryAn interview with David Kahan, a Holocaust survivor, conducted by Dr. Sidney Bolkosky, Professor of History at the University of Michigan--Dearborn. Mr. Kahan was born in 1928 in Gheorgheni, Romania. Under Romanian rule, the Kahan family experienced very few antisemitic incidents. However, with the annexation of Transylvania by Hungary in 1940, the situation began to change and the Jewish community began experiencing increased antisemitism at the hands of the Hungarians. In 1944, the Germans invaded Hungary and immediately began the full-scale persecution of the Jews. The Kahan family was detained and then deported to the ghetto in Szaszregen and then to Auschwitz where David's father, mother, sister and younger brother were gassed upon arrival. David, only 15 years old, was held at Auschwitz for about four weeks and then transported to the Mühldorf labor camp in southwestern Germany. He worked clearing trees for the construction of an underground airplane factory. He was later transported to another labor camp, Mittergars for a short time and then sent back to Mühldorf. He was liberated by the American Army near the town of Seeshaupt, Germany in April 1945. He eventually made his way to the Detroit area in 1950b12508974
Simon Kalmas Oral HistoryAn interview with Simon Kalmas, a Holocaust survivor, conducted by Arthur Kirsch. Simon Kalmas was born in Drobin, Poland in 1915. As a boy he learned the trade of tinsmithing. After the German invasion of Poland, Simon and the men of his town were taken and held in another city for five days before being returned home and told to move into the Drobin ghetto later moving to the Neustadt Oberschlesien ghetto. Simon had the chance to escape to Russia but chose to stay with his family in Poland. The family remained together until 1942 when they were deported to Auschwitz. Simon was chosen for work in the coal mines of IG Farben Industry before being selected for his tinsmithing skills to repair the roofs of bombarded barracks from 1944 until 1945. After that, Simon was forced to march to Gleiwitz in a snowstorm to catch a transport train to Buchenwald where he was liberated. Simon moved to Nashville, Tennessee in April 1949 but moved permanently to Detroit in January 1950 because of the racism he saw happening against African Americans in the Southb12903802
Alexander Karp Oral HistoryAn interview with Alexander Karp, a Holocaust survivor, conducted by Dr. Sidney Bolkosky, Professor of History at the University of Michigan--Dearborn. Mr. Karp was born in Baktaloranthaza, a small town in Hungary. In 1944, when he was about 19 years old, his family was moved into the Kisvarda ghetto. His immediate family consisted of his mother and 15 year old sister, his father had been taken prisoner in Russia in 1942 and the family did not know if he was alive or dead. The family was transported to Birkenau where Mr. Karp was separated from his mother and sister. He and an uncle spent about 4 months in Birkenau. Claiming to be tool and die makers, they were sent to several different camps eventually ending up at an underground airplane factory in the Kochendorf area. In March 1945, they were evacuated to Dachau and then to Mittenwald, a town close to the Austrian border, where they were liberated. In August 1945 he was reunited with his fatherb12362463
Louis Kaye Oral HistoryAn interview with Louis Kaye, a Holocaust survivor, conducted by Arthur Kirsch. Louis Kaye was born in Włoszczowa, Poland in 1925. When the war broke out, Louis amd his family were moved into a ghetto where they lived until his parents and most of siblings were sent to Treblinka while Louis and two of his brothers were sent to Skarzysko. Louis worked in an ammunitions factory for two years until he was sent to Czestochowa, Buchenwald, and finally Dora-Nordhausen where he was liberated April 11, 1945. Several years after liberation, Louis immigrated to the United States and in 1969, built a monument in the United States to memorialize his family and his birth cityb12896512
Ruth Kent Oral HistoryAn interview with Ruth Kent, a Holocaust survivor, conducted by Dr. Sidney Bolkosky, Professor of History at the University of Michigan--Dearborn. Ruth Kent was born in Lódz, Poland and lived with her family in the Lódz ghetto until it was liquidated in 1944. The family was then sent to Auschwitz where they were separated and some family members were immediately put to death. Ruth and a sister were sent to Stutthof, a labor camp, where they were later separated. Ruth survived a forced march as the Germans evacuated the camps in the face of the advancing Russian army. She was liberated by the Russians and was reunited with two brothers after the warb12042523
Bernard Klein Oral HistoryAn interview with Bernard and Emery Klein, brothers and Holocaust survivors, conducted by Dr. Sidney Bolkosky, Professor of History at the University of Michigan--Dearborn. The Klein brothers were born in Humenné, a town in eastern Slovakia. The immediate family of the brothers included their parents and a younger sister. The Germans occupied the area in 1939 and started to deport the Jews in 1941. The Klein family was not deported until 1944 because Mr. Klein was an important farming advisor. The family was sent to Auschwitz without Bernard, who had become separated. Mrs. Klein and her daughter were immediately gassed upon arrival at the camp. Bernard was reunited with his brother and father at Auschwitz a month later. The three were sent to Gleiwitz where Emery and his father worked in a factory while Bernard worked in the concentration camp kitchen. In 1945, as the Russian army advanced into the area, the camp was evacuated to Blechhammer, another camp in the vicinity. The German guards fled the camp, leaving the prisoners. A few days later, the brothers, their father and several others began walking back to Humenné. The Klein family moved to Israel, Montreal and eventually to Detroitb12286096
Martin Koby Oral HistoryAn interview with Martin Koby, a Holocaust survivor, conducted by Dr. Sidney Bolkosky, Professor of History at the University of Michigan--Dearborn. Martin Koby was born in Rovno, Poland in 1930. During the 1930s, Martin along with his mother, father, and brother, moved to the neighboring village of Giuszwica. During the pre-war period, Martin and his family experienced several incidents of anti-Semitism, especially during Christian holidays. In 1939, the Soviet Union annexed eastern Poland as part of a secret agreement contained in the Nazi-Soviet Non-Aggression Pact and Giuszwica came under Soviet control. Under Soviet rule, Martin and his family lived a relatively normal life. In the summer of 1941, the Germans invaded the Soviet Union and Giuszwica came under German control. Under German rule, anti-Semitism increased among the local population and Martin's father was abducted and beaten by members of the Ukrainian Liberation Army (UPA). Martin's father was released and due to the influence of a wealthy Polish landowner, the family was sent to work on an estate, rather than sent to the newly established Jewish ghetto in Rovno. In September 1942, the family, hearing news of the liquidation of the Rovno ghetto, went into hiding. Between 1942 and 1944, the family hid in six different locations in and around Giuszwica, usually with the knowledge and complicity of the local population. In February 1944, the Soviets liberated the area and the family moved to Rovno. In late 1945, they were allowed by the Soviet government to relocate to Poland and moved to Bytom, near Katowice. Sometime in 1946 or 1947, the family traveled to a displaced persons camp (the Sedan Kaserne) in Ulm, Germany. From there they made their way to the United Statesb12604045
Henry Konstam Oral HistoryAn interview with Henry Konstam, a Holocaust survivor, conducted by Dr. Sidney Bolkosky, Professor of History at the University of Michigan--Dearborn. Born in Lódz, Poland, Henry Konstam and his five siblings were deported to the Lódz ghetto in 1940. In the ghetto, Henry volunteered to go to a labor camp in Gronow where he remained for two and a half years until he was sent to a labor camp in Posen. From Posen, Henry was transported to Auschwitz-Birkenau and later to Jaworzno. In the last days of the war, Henry survived a march from Jaworzno to Dachau before escaping into the surrounding woods. After crawling to a nearby farm for food, he was captured and imprisoned in a German jail until the end of the war that occurred a few days later. Henry was reunited, after the war, with his only surviving family members, his brother and sisterb12766860
Kozlowski Oral HistoryAn interview with Marvin Kozlowski, a Holocaust survivor, conducted by Dr. Sidney Bolkosky, Professor of History at the University of Michigan--Dearborn. Marvin Kozlowski was born in Radom, Poland in 1920. Following the German invasion of Poland, Marvin and his family were placed in the Radom Ghetto where he worked as a forced laborer for Daimler-Benz. While in the ghetto, Marvin's mother and three siblings were deported to the Treblinka death camp. Following the liquidation of the Radom Ghetto in 1944, Marvin and his father were marched to Tomaszów where they were put on a train and shipped to Auschwitz-Birkenau. Upon arrival, they were immediately sent to an unidentified labor camp in western Germany. After a brief time, they were sent to Unterriexingen, a labor sub-kommando of Natzweiler Concentration Camp. After one month, the camp was liquidated and Marvin and his father were liberated near Osterburken, Germany while en-route to an unknown destinationb12651588
Dr. Henry Krystal Oral HistoryAn interview with Dr. Henry Krystal, a Holocaust survivor, conducted by Dr. Sidney Bolkosky, Professor of History at the University of Michigan--Dearborn. Dr. Krystal was born in Sosnowiec, Poland in 1925. Shortly after the Nazi invasion, Dr. Krystal's brother and then father escaped to the Soviet occupied zone of Poland while Henry and his mother lived in Bodzentyn, Poland. In 1942 Henry was sent to a labor camp and his mother sent to Treblinka where she died. From 1942 until the end of the war, Henry was a member of a labor Kommando sent from place to place, including Starachowice, Bobrek, Birkenau, Siemenstadt and Sachsenhausen. He worked in a factory operated by the Siemens company. At the end of the war he was in the city of Schwerin, in the British occupied zone of Germany. In 1947 Dr. Krystal immigrated to Detroit, Michigan where he lived with an aunt and uncle, went to school and became a psychiatristb12407562
Stefa Kupfer Oral HistoryAn interview with Stefa (Sarah) Sprecher Kupfer, a Holocaust survivor, conducted by Dr. Sidney Bolkosky, Professor of History at the University of Michigan--Dearborn. Mrs. Kupfer was ten years old and living in Sanok, Poland when the war started. Her father was killed in the early days of the occupation. Stefa, her mother and young sister went into hiding instead of registering with the occupational government. They were hidden in the basement of Mrs. Orlewska, a Polish woman, who played a significant role in their survival. They were also aided by other Poles, some of whom knew they were Jewsb12066643
Alfred Lessing Oral HistoryAn interview with Alfred Lessing, a Holocaust survivor, conducted by Dr. Sidney Bolkosky, Professor of History at the University of Michigan--Dearborn. Mr. Lessing recalls his experiences living with other families as a hidden child in the Netherlands during the war. He talks about the last year of the war when he was reunited and lived with his father and brothersb12017796
Rene Lichtman Oral HistoryAn interview with Rene Lichtman, a Holocaust survivor, conducted by Dr. Sidney Bolkosky, Professor of History at the University of Michigan-Dearborn. Rene was born in Paris, France in 1937, the only son of Polish immigrants who arrived in France in the 1930's. After his birth, his parents hired Anne Lepage to serve as Rene's guardian. Under this arrangement, Rene spent weekdays with the Lepages in a small town northeast of Paris and returned home on the weekends. Rene's father joined the French Army shortly before the outbreak of World War II. His father was killed in action in May 1940 when the Germans invaded the Benelux countries. After the fall of France, Rene's mother sent him to stay with the Lepages on a permanent basis where he was a hidden child for the remainder of the war. His mother went into hiding in Paris in 1942. After the war, Rene returned to his mother in Paris where the two stayed for five years. In 1950, Rene's mother married an American Orthodox Jew and the two moved from France to Williamsburg, New York, returning to France once in 1957 to visit the Lepagesb12537755
Leo Liffman Oral HistoryAn interview with Leo Liffman, a Holocaust survivor, conducted by Dr. Sidney Bolkosky, Professor of History at the University of Michigan--Dearborn. Leo Liffman was born and raised in Wiesbaden, Germany. He relates his experiences with anti-Semitism as a child and young adult during the closing years of the Weimar Republic and the early Hitler years. He was arrested during Kristallnacht and imprisoned for several weeks at Buchenwald concentration camp. He left Germany in 1939, leaving his parents behind, and was the only member of his family to survive the warb12089291
Felina Lusopolus Oral HistoryAn interview with Felina Lusopolus, a Holocaust survivor, conducted by Dawn Miller. Felina Lusopolus (maiden name Greenberg) was born in Bucharest, Romania in 1919. Her mother died when Felina was just two and a half years old. Her father, who worked in the lumber business until he died at the age of 49, sent his daughter to boarding school. After her father's death, Felina moved in with her grandmother in Chernowitz, finished high school, went to college and got a degree in teaching. Felina moved to Oradea to become a teacher and became engaged to a Jewish lawyer who was sent to the Russian front. After the ghetto was started in Oradea, Felina was sent to Auschwitz. She was then sent to a camp called Langenbielau-Biewala (a sub-camp of Gross Rosen) near Reichenbach and then sent to Parschnitz. The last camp she was sent to was in the Sudetenland and she worked in a factory making airplane parts. After the Russians liberated the camp, Felina started her long journey back home to Oradea where she found out her fiancé had died on his way home to see her. She acquired a job translating Hungarian movies left behind after the war into Romanian. She married a Gentile Greek professor and had one daughter. The Communists imprisoned her husband after he told two jokes in his classroom that offended the regime. Weakened by his ordeal, he died in 1957, three years after being released. Felina applied for a passport out of Communist Romania after his death. She was granted the passport and moved first to Paris, then Belgium, Germany and finally to the United States where she moved in with her aunts in Detroitb12858237
Helena Manaster Oral HistoryAn interview with Helena Manaster, a Holocaust survivor, conducted by Jonathon Fishbane. Born in Poland, Helena was one of eight children, all of whom were adults at the beginning of the war. After the German invasion in 1939, the family separated and Helen, along with several siblings and their father went to Lwów, which was under Soviet control at the time. In June 1941, the Germans invaded the Soviet Union and occupied Lwów. Helena's father and brothers were sent to Belzec, where they died in the gas chambers. Helena and her husband were moved to Lesko and then on to Zamosc. Because Helena's husband was a doctor, the Germans sent them to a labor camp in Rokitna. They eventually escaped and made their way to Kraków, where they remained in hiding until the end of the warb12554832
John Mandel Oral HistoryAn interview with John Mandel, a Holocaust survivor, conducted by Charlene Green. John Mandel was born in 1927? in Munkacs, Czechoslovakia. After the Hungarian annexation of the area in 1938, John and his family suffered increasing persecution in the Hungarian regime. The family was deported to Birkenau in May 1944. John's mother, sister and two younger brothers were gassed upon arrival and John was separated from his father and another brother when he was transferred to Auschwitz I. After about seven months in Auschwitz I, John was transferred to Mauthausen then to Melk and finally to Ebensee (both sub-camps of Mauthausen), where he was liberated by the American Army in spring, 1945. After liberation, John went to the Displaced Persons Camp at Gabersee and in 1946, he emigrated to the United Statesb12656823
Simon Maroko Oral HistoryAn interview with Simon Maroko, a Holocaust survivor, conducted by Dr. Sidney Bolkosky, Professor of History at the University of Michigan--Dearborn. Dr. Simon Maroko was born in Tarnów, Poland in 1923. Shortly after his birth, Dr. Maroko's family relocated to Bratislava, Czechoslovakia and then to Amsterdam, the Netherlands. In 1943, Simon's parents were deported to Westerbork and most likely from there to Auschwitz-Birkenau. Following the deportation, Dr. Maroko went into hiding on a farm outside of Amsterdam. He was liberated in May 1945. He immigrated to Israel where he served in the Israeli Army. Following that, he immigrated to the United Statesb12761540
Lucy Merritt Oral HistoryAn interview with Lucy Glaser Merritt, a Holocaust survivor, conducted by Dr. Sidney Bolkosky, Professor of History at the University of Michigan--Dearborn. Lucy Glaser Merritt was born in Vienna, Austria in 1920. Following the German annexation (Anschluss) of Austria in 1938, Lucy and her family experienced increased persecution by both Austrian and German National Socialists. After Lucy's father was arrested and released on Kristallnacht (1938), the family decided to leave Austria. Lucy left Austria to work as a nurse in England. Once there, she was able to secure the passage of her family from Austria to England. From England, they immigrated to the United Statesb12766951
Paul Molnar Oral HistoryAn interview with Paul Molnar, a Holocaust survivor, conducted by Dr. Sidney Bolkosky, Professor of History at the University of Michigan--Dearborn. Paul Molnar was born in 1929 in Rákospalota, a suburb of Budapest, Hungary. Following the outbreak of the war, Paul and his family came under increasing persecution by the pro-German Hungarian government. In 1944, his father was sent to a labor camp and in July Paul, along with his mother, brother and grandmother, were deported to Auschwitz-Birkenau. After arrival, Paul's mother, brother and grandmother were gassed. After a brief time in Auschwitz-Birkenau, Paul was sent to Buchenwald and then to Magdeburg where he worked at a factory run by I.G. Farben. He then returned briefly to Buchenwald and then was sent to another camp, Berga. In April 1945, Paul was evacuated from Berga and while marching to an unknown destination, he escaped and was liberated. Paul later immigrated to the United Statesb12694915
Abraham Mondry Oral HistoryAn interview with Abraham Mondry, a Holocaust survivor, conducted by Dr. Sidney Bolkosky, Professor of History at the University of Michigan--Dearborn. Mr. Mondry was born in Mlawa, Poland and with the outbreak of the war his family was deported to the Warsaw ghetto. Before, during, and after the war, Abraham actively worked as a smuggler on the black market. Abraham spent three years at Auschwitz where he served as a nurse aid to Dr. Mengele. With the liquidation of Auschwitz, Abraham was marched to Ebensee where he was soon liberated by American forces. Recovering from health problems, Abraham lived in Italy where he continued his black market activities until 1949 when he immigrated to the United Statesb12777250
Nathan Nothman Oral HistoryAn interview with Nathan Nothman, a Holocaust survivor, conducted by Donna Miller. Nathan Nothman was born on July 15, 1925 in Kraków, Poland. Following the German invasion of Poland, Nathan, his parents, and his three brothers and sister were forced to move into the Kraków ghetto. Nathan and his father worked for the Nazis as plumbers and were allowed to leave the ghetto for work until his father was sent to Auschwitz and killed. In 1943 when the ghetto was liquidated, Nathan was sent to the Plaszów concentration camp and then to Gross-Rosen where he was assigned to a work detail on the Steinburg. He was then sent to Flossenburg to work on the railroads in 1945. Nathan and his friend escaped during a death march and walked to Laufen where he was rescued by the American Army. After some time in the DP camp at Laufen, he was transferred to the Ainring DP camp where he met and married his wife. Nathan was also reunited with his sister and mother after the war and together they moved to the United States in 1950b12938105
Sonia Nothman Oral HistoryAn interview with Sonia Nothman, a Holocaust survivor, conducted by Dawn Miller. Sonia Nothman was born in Chmielnik, Poland in 1922. When the war started, Sonia was visiting family in Lódz. She returned to Chmielnik but due to her Polish language skills was able to move between Chmielnik and Lódz. In 1941, a ghetto was established in Chmielnik and Sonia, along with her family was placed in the ghetto. In 1942, Sonia, her brother and sister were deported to the Skarzysko-Kamienna forced labor camp. In 1944, Sonia was sent to Czenstochow. From there she was sent west into Germany proper where she and her sister were marched to several labor camps (Bergen-Belsen, Berga, Dachau and Allach). The American Army liberated them in 1945b12787851
Nathan Offen Oral HistoryAn interview with Nathan, Bernard and Samuel Offen, Holocaust survivors and brothers, conducted by Dr. Sidney Bolkosky, Professor of History at the University of Michigan--Dearborn. The Offen family was from Kraków, Poland. The brothers tell stories of their life in the Kraków ghetto, Plaszów labor camp and Mauthausen concentration camp. While at Plaszów, Bernard and other children were transported out of camp, most likely to be executed. However, Bernard managed to escape and was then smuggled into another sub-camp to be with an uncle. The family was later reunited at Plaszów until they were sent to Mauthausen. After arriving at Mauthausen, Bernard and his father were separated from Sam and Nathan and sent to Auschwitz. Shortly after arriving at Auschwitz, their father was selected by Dr. Menegele and sent to the gas chamber. After the war, Sam and Nathan went to Italy where Bernard later found themb1231318x
Sam Offen Oral HistoryAn interview with Samuel Offen, a Holocaust survivor, conducted by Dr. Sidney Bolkosky, Professor of History at the University of Michigan--Dearborn. Sam Offen lived in Krakow, Poland. After the German invasion of 1939, Sam, his father, and his brothers, Nathan and Bernie, were recruited by the Germans as forced laborers. Nathan was sent to a nearby rock quarry to work. In 1942, Sam's mother and sister were rounded-up and deported and the three brothers and their father were sent to Plaszów. After a short time, the Offens were sent to Gusen I, a sub-camp of Mauthausen. There Sam and Nathan were separated from Bernie and their father it was the last time Sam saw his father. In 1945, Sam and Nathan were liberated by the American army. While waiting in Italy for a ship bound for Palestine, they learned of a Polish unit of the British army, based in Italy, and decided to join. Several weeks later, Bernie found his brothers and was reunited with them. In late 1946 or early 1947, Nathan and Sam went to England to be discharged, taking Bernie with them. The three brothers lived in England until 1951 when they emigrated to the United Statesb12574338
Michael Opas Oral HistoryAn interview with Michael Opas, a Holocaust survivor, conducted by Paul H. Draznan. Michael Opas was born in Lódz, Poland in 1910. In his youth, he learned the furrier trade but as an adult he operated his own shoe business. At the start of World War II, Michael, his wife and young son fled to Warsaw where they were imprisoned in the Warsaw ghetto. Michael was sent to Majdanek then to Budzyn, a forced labor camp that repaired airplanes. From there he was sent to various camps like Ostrowiec and Auschwitz-Birkenau before finally being sent to Buchenwald, where he was liberated by the American Army. At liberation Michael was grossly underweight and had to recuperate for two months in a makeshift hospital in Buchenwald until he regained some weight and his health. After that he spent time in the Landsberg DP camp and then moved to the Stuttgart DP camp where he re-married and started a family. Michael, his new wife and one-year-old daughter moved to Detroit in 1949b12857385
Abraham Pasternak Oral HistoryAn interview with Abraham Pasternak, a Holocaust survivor, conducted by Dr. Sidney Bolkosky, Professor of History at the University of Michigan--Dearborn. Born in Betlan, Romania, he relates his experiences in Romania during the Nazi occupation and his internment in several concentration camps, including Auschwitz, Buchenwald, Theresienstadt, Schlieben (a satellite of Buchenwald) and Zeitz, a city in Germanyb12018703
Alexander Raab Oral HistoryAn interview with Alexander Raab, a Holocaust survivor, conducted by Dr. Sidney Bolkosky, Professor of History at the University of Michigan--Dearborn. Alexander Raab was born in 1933 in Jarosław, Poland. Following the German invasion in 1939, the Jews in the area were deported over the San River, into territory newly annexed by the Soviet Union. Following a brief stay in Grudek, the NKVD deported the family to Siberia. After an arduous journey, the family spent time in the cities of Sinyuga and Bodaibo. During this period, Alexander's father was sent to a labor commando, where he perished. In 1943 or 1944, the family was sent west to the city of Saratov. After the end of the war, they went to Świdnica, Poland. Alexander attempted to illegally immigrate to Palestine via a boat from Italy but the British Navy captured the ship. Interned by the British, he spent several years on the island of Cyprus and was finally successful in reaching Israel in 1948. He immigrated to America in 1962b12661193
Mrs. Roemerfeld Oral HistoryAn interview with Mrs. Roemerfeld, a Holocaust survivor, conducted by Eva Lipton. Mrs. Roemerfeld was born in Plonsk, Poland. Following the Nazi invasion in 1939, Mrs. Roemerfeld, along with her parents and older brother, were paced in a makeshift ghetto in the city. During that period, her father was shipped to Auschwitz-Birkenau and in December 1942, she, along with her remaining family, was shipped there as well. After arrival, Mrs. Roemerfeld was placed in the Kanada Kommando sorting clothes. She was then transferred to Budy, a sub-camp of Auschwitz-Birkenau. After the liquidation of the Auschwitz-Birkenau camp system, Mrs. Roemerfeld was sent to Maehrisch-Weisswasser, a sub-camp of Gross-Rosen, and also worked at a Telefunken factory. Mrs. Roemerfeld was fifty-five years of age at the time of her undated interviewb12789410
Nathan Roth Oral HistoryAn interview with Nathan Roth, a Holocaust survivor, conducted by Dr. Sidney Bolkosky, Professor of History at the University of Michigan--Dearborn. Nathan Roth was born in Veliky Bereznyy, Czechoslovakia. After the German annexation of the area in 1944, Nathan, along with his mother, father and eight siblings, was deported to the ghetto in Ungvár where the family was split up. From Ungvár, Nathan was deported to Auschwitz-Birkenau and then to Jaworzno, a sub-camp of Auschwitz. While he was at Jaworzno, Nathan worked for I.G. Farben, a German company operating an excavation project in the area. Nathan was liberated by the Russians while on the death march following the evacuation of the Jaworzno camp. He returned to Veliky Bereznyy after the war and emigrated to the United States in 1949b12596504
Agi Rubin Oral HistoryAn interview with Agi Rubin, a Holocaust survivor, conducted by Dr. Sidney Bolkosky, Professor of History at the University of Michigan--Dearborn. Agi Rubin was born in Monkacz, a town in the part of Czechoslovakia which was annexed to Hungary in 1938. In 1944 her family was deported to Auschwitz where her mother and younger brother were killed. She worked in a sorting shed in the camp until it was evacuated in Jan. 1945. She survived a forced march of several months duration and was liberated in Germany when she was 15 years old. She was later reunited with her fatherb12043734
Zoltan Rubin Oral HistoryAn interview with Zoltan Rubin, a Holocaust survivor, conducted by Dr. Sidney Bolkosky, Professor of History at the University of Michigan--Dearborn. Zoltan Rubin was from Kapúsány, Czechoslovakia. He was the youngest child in a large family of eight sons and three daughters. His family was fairly well off since his father owned a large farm and several mills. Zoltan and his parents were protected from deportation by an economic exemption until 1942 when the exemption was eliminated and his parents were deported. Zoltan was able to avoid deportation by using Gentile papers given to him by friends. In 1944, he was captured with a group of partisans and sent to a prisoner-of-war camp near Jena where he was part of a forced labor detail digging tunnels for the Germans. Towards the end of the war, he escaped with three others and lived off the land for about six weeks until the American army arrived in the area. He was later reunited with an older brother who was a doctor with the Czechoslovakian armyb12319697
Leon Salomon Oral HistoryAn interview with Leon Salomon, a Holocaust survivor, conducted by Dr. Sidney Bolkosky, Professor of History at the University of Michigan--Dearborn. Mr. Salomon was born in Maków Mazowiecki, Poland and lived there with his family until Poland was occupied by the Germans in 1939. Leon and two of his sisters moved east to Kobylnik to live with their brother, a school teacher who was later killed when the Germans took over the area. In 1942, the Jewish residents of the town were executed by the Germans in a nearby forest. As Leon was being taken away to be shot, he escaped from the guards and hid in the forest. Leon was the only member of his immediate family to survive and eventually joined a partisan group fighting in the Vilna and White Russia area. He joined the Soviet Army near the end of the war and fought with them until he was wounded in east Prussiab12069929
Vera Schey Oral HistoryAn interview with Vera Schey, a Holocaust survivor, conducted by Dr. Sidney Bolkosky, Professor of History at the University of Michigan--Dearborn. Vera Schey was born in Budapest, Hungary. An only child whose father died before the war, Vera and her mother survived the German annexation of Hungary in 1944 by obtaining false identification papers. During the last months of the war, the two hid in different locations in and around Budapest, separating and reuniting on several occasions. Vera left Hungary for the United States in 1946b12651606
Sam Seltzer Oral HistoryAn interview with Sam Seltzer, a Holocaust survivor, conducted by Anita Schwartz. Sam Seltzer was born in Modzurów (Modzdrzejow), Poland. Sam's family consisted of his mother, father and five siblings. Following the outbreak of the war, his mother and siblings attempted to flee east to the Russian border. Unable to complete their journey, they stayed instead with Sam's older sister in the small town of Zawiercie. After a brief time, Sam returned to Modzurów until he was rounded up by the Germans and placed in a number of forced-labor camps, including Sosnowiec, Klettendorf, Geppersdorf, Brande, Graeditz, Faulbrück and Annaberg. In 1944, Sam was sent to Auschwitz-Birkenau. After several weeks in Birkenau, Sam volunteered to work as a mechanic and was sent to a labor Kommando attached to Buchenwald. Sam was liberated in Buchenwald in April 1945. After liberation, Sam was hospitalized for several years in Feldafing, Germany. In 1947, Sam's brother entered the same hospital and they were reunited. Sam immigrated to the United States in 1951 and his brother joined him a few years laterb12651618
Martin Shlanger Oral HistoryAn interview with Martin Shlanger, a Holocaust survivor, conducted by Dr. Sidney Bolkosky, Professor of History at the University of Michigan--Dearborn. Born in Vel'ke Kapusany, Czechoslovakia, Mr. Shlanger moved to Budapest in 1942 to work in a factory. In March 1944 the Germans occupied the city. Mr. Shlanger acquired false papers but was soon identified as a Jew and arrested. He was sent to Jaworzno, a sub-camp in the Auschwitz system. In 1945, he survived a death march to Blechhammer as the Russian army invaded the area. Because he hid when the Germans left Blechhammer, he was left behind at the camp and eventually encountered the Soviet army. He was reunited for a short time with his brother, who was serving with the Czechoslovak Brigade in the Soviet army. Martin returned to his hometown where he lived until 1949 when he immigrated to Detroit, Michiganb12213007
Irene Sobel Oral HistoryAn interview with Irene Sobel (Miller), a Holocaust survivor, conducted by Dr. Sidney Bolkosky, Professor of History at the University of Michigan--Dearborn. Irene was born in Warsaw, Poland and lived with her parents and sister in a Jewish neighborhood of the city. The family was not religious but embraced the Jewish culture. After the Germans invaded Poland, her family decided to escape to Russia fearing they would be prosecuted for being Communist. After being denied entrance into Russia, Mr. Miller escaped over the border and came back with falsified documents to get the family across. After residing in Ignatki for a short time, Soviet transport trains picked the family up and shipped them east to a Communist work camp in Siberia. After being released from the camp, the family was transported to Tashkent where Irene's parents were forced to work on a collective farm and the girls were put into an orphanage. Mr. Miller became ill and died during a dysentery epidemic even though Mrs. Miller walked all night to try and get him antibiotics. After the war Irene and her family returned to Poland where Irene was put into a Krakow orphanage because her mother couldn't support her. Eventually Irene and her mother moved to Haifa, Israel where Irene met her husband, Howard Sobel, an American living in Israel. Irene then moved to Cleveland with her husband and had three children, later moving to Detroit. Irene went to school, obtaining graduate degrees, and achieved a successful professional career. Irene and her husband later divorcedb12846144
Emanuel Tanay Oral HistoryAn interview with Dr. Emanuel Tanay, a Holocaust survivor, conducted by Dr. Sidney Bolkosky, Professor of History at the University of Michigan--Dearborn. Although he was born in Vilna in 1928, Dr. Tanay spent the pre-war years in Miechow, a small community south of Krakow, Poland. During the occupation, his family lived in the Miechow ghetto until Tanay, his mother and sister escaped just before it was liquidated. His father did not escape and was later executed by Amon Goeth. Tanay spent part of the war living in a monastery hidden as a novice and converted Jew. He later used false Aryan papers as he moved around Poland and Hungaryb12064701
Miriam Troostwyk Oral HistoryAn interview with Miriam Troostwyk, a Holocaust survivor, conducted by Dr. Sidney Bolkosky, Professor of History at the University of Michigan--Dearborn. This is a continuation of an interview started on May 20, 1998. Miriam continues to tell how other family members and friends helped the family, consisting of Miriam, who was about 11 years old, her mother, an older sister and her sister's husband, evade several German rounds-ups until the family went into hiding, first in Velp and later in Arnhem. In Arnhem the family stayed in the house of Mr. and Mrs. Vandenberg with several other families. The Troostwyks remained there until the liberation of the Netherlands in 1944b12615638
Rose Wagner Oral HistoryAn interview with Rose Wagner, a Holocaust survivor, conducted by Dr. Sidney Bolkosky, Professor of History at the University of Michigan--Dearborn. At the outbreak of the war in 1939, Rose and her family lived in Lódz, Poland. After the German occupation, the family found themselves in the Lódz ghetto. By 1942, her parents had perished, leaving Rose and her sister to fend for themselves in the ghetto. In 1944, the sisters were deported to Auschwitz-Birkenau. Able to stay together in the camp, the sisters were sent to the Halbstadt concentration camp in fall, 1944, where they were liberated in May 1945b12659125
Larry Wayne Oral HistoryAn interview with Larry Wayne, a Holocaust survivor, conducted by Dr. Sidney Bolkosky, Professor of History at the University of Michigan--Dearborn. Larry Wayne was born in Lódz, Poland in 1923. He had three blood siblings and two adopted siblings. His family owned a successful bakery and sent him to private school at the Katzenelson Gymnasium where he was trained to be a lieutenant in the Polish army. Shortly after the Nazi invasion, Larry and his extended family were forced to move into a small apartment in the Lódz ghetto in 1940. His father died in the ghetto. Afterwards Larry's family was transported to Auschwitz-Birkenau where his mother and little brother were gassed in 1944. Larry and his brother Jack signed up to work at the Janina coal mine and then were relocated to various camps. Larry attempted to escape during this relocation period and was shot in the knee. He was brought to Buchenwald where the Allied forces liberated him in 1945. After the war Larry was treated for typhoid fever by the American army and moved to Bad Nauheim where he began smuggling Aliyah Bet. Once he reunited with his brother Jack and sister Ruth, they immigrated to Detroit in 1946b1283032x
Ruth Musch Webber Oral HistoryAn interview with Ruth Muschkies Webber, a Holocaust survivor, conducted by Dr. Sidney Bolkosky, Professor of History at the University of Michigan--Dearborn. Ruth Webber was about 5 years old when the war started. Her family was first moved into the Ostrowiec ghetto and then lived in the following camps Bodzechow, Sandomierz, Starachowice, Austrovietz, Annopol and finally Auschwitz. Her mother survived the war but her father died on the last transport out of Auschwitz. Ruth was in the children's block of Auschwitz when it was liberated by the Russians on Jan. 27, 1945b12042444
Michael Weiss Oral HistoryAn interview with Michael Weiss, a Holocaust survivor, conducted by Dr. Sidney Bolkosky, Professor of History at the University of Michigan--Dearborn. Born in Kascony, Czechoslovakia, Mr. Weiss chronicles his experiences under the Czechoslovakians, Hungarians, and Germans, both prior to and during, the Second World War. Mr. Weiss and his family were shipped to the Hungarian ghetto of Beregszasz (Berehovo) in 1944. From Beregszasz, the family was deported to Auschwitz, where his mother was gassed by the Germans. From Auschwitz, Weiss and his father were sent to Buchenwald and then on to Zeitzb12407574
Shari Weiss Oral HistoryAn interview with Shari Weiss, a Holocaust survivor, conducted by Robert Roth at the Holocaust Memorial Center in West Bloomfield, Michigan. Mrs. Weiss was born in Harina, a small village in Romania. When she was eight or nine, Shari went to live with an aunt and uncle in Cluj where she stayed until 1944 when the Germans occupied Hungary. In May 1944 they were transported to Auschwitz after staying at a transit camp in a brick factory for three weeks. Shari describes her life at Auschwitz where she and her aunt stayed for about five months before they were taken to a labor camp in Altenburg, Germany. She worked in a factory until April 1945 when the inmates were marched out of the camp. Shari and her aunt were liberated by the American army two days later. Shari's uncle did not survive the warb12073027
Cyla Wiener Oral HistoryAn interview with Cyla Wiener, a Holocaust survivor, conducted by Dr. Sidney Bolkosky, Professor of History at the University of Michigan--Dearborn. Mrs. Wiener was born in Kraków, Poland during World War I, one of nine children and the only girl. She recalls her experiences in the Kraków ghetto and the concentration camps of Plaszów, Auschwitz and Bergen-Belsen during World War II. At Plaszów she helped care for the children, including her two year old son, until they were taken to Auschwitz. She worked as a seamstress at Plaszów and later at Auschwitz and Bergen-Belsen, sewing for the Germans. After the war, she returned to Kraków and was reunited with her husband, a few remaining brothers and nieces. Mrs. Wiener and her husband eventually immigrated to the United Statesb12230534
William Agusta Oral HistoryMCLS 0001
Charles Anger Oral HistoryMCLS 0002
Emerald & Lila Baker Oral HistoryMCLS 0003
Anthony Banek Oral HistoryMCLS 0004
Norman & Edith Barkenquast Oral HistoryMCLS 0005
John F. Barnes Oral HistoryMCLS 0006
Ernest Bashaw Oral HistoryMCLS 0007
John & Emillie Bellair Oral HistoryMCLS 0008
Vern C. Bellner Oral HistoryMCLS 0009
Edward Bergmoser Oral HistoryMCLS 0010
Mildred Bernitt Oral HistoryMCLS 0011
Gilbert Berns Oral HistoryMCLS 0012
Mrs. William Bert Oral HistoryMCLS 0013
Viola Berta Oral HistoryMCLS 0014
Edward Bicking Oral HistoryMCLS 0015
Agnes Bigelow Oral HistoryMCLS 0017
Frank Billmaier Oral HistoryMCLS 0018
Frank Billmaier Oral HistoryMCLS 0018
William & Mildred Binns Oral HistoryMCLS 0019
Kenneth & Margaret Bird Oral HistoryMCLS 0020
Charles Black Oral HistoryMCLS 0021
Charles Boes Oral HistoryMCLS 0022
Anna Marie Bonifacio Oral HistoryMCLS 0023
Bonsac Oral HistoryMCLS 0024
Walter Boos Oral HistoryMCLS 0025
Dorothy Borhani Oral HistoryMCLS 0026
Dorothy Bosanac Oral HistoryMCLS 0027
Everett R Bosenbark Oral HistoryMCLS 0028
Marion Boudrie Oral HistoryMCLS 0029
Mabel Bourbina Oral HistoryMCLS 0030
Ethel & Leon Bowman Oral HistoryMCLS 0031
Edward Brooks Oral HistoryMCLS 0032
Jacob Bunkleman Oral HistoryMCLS 0033
Alex Burhart Oral HistoryMCLS 0034
Burkett Oral HistoryMCLS 0035
Burkett Oral HistoryMCLS 0035
Marjorie Busz Oral HistoryMCLS 0036
Virginia Caine-Crenshaw Oral HistoryMCLS 0037
Edgar Calkins Oral HistoryMCLS 0038
William Champagne Oral HistoryMCLS 0039
Arthur & Betty Chapman Oral HistoryMCLS 0040
Delmont Jr. Chapman Oral HistoryMCLS 0041
Delmont Chapman Oral HistoryMCLS 0042
Alfred Cloum Oral HistoryMCLS 0043
Raymond Colpaert Oral HistoryMCLS 0044
Mrs. Francis Conlisk Oral HistoryMCLS 0045
Peter Conte Oral HistoryMCLS 0046
Landon Cooke Oral HistoryMCLS 0047
Mary Cooper Oral HistoryMCLS 0048
Gladys & Lois Cousino Oral HistoryMCLS 0049
Rosa Cousumano Oral HistoryMCLS 0050
Virginia Logan Covington Oral HistoryMCLS 0051
Melville Cowell Oral HistoryMCLS 0052
George Cuthbert Oral HistoryMCLS 0053
Alina Czech Oral HistoryMCLS 0054
Glenn Daniels Oral HistoryMCLS 0055
Claude Davis Oral HistoryMCLS 0056
Fred Degner Oral HistoryMCLS 0057
Esther Deinzer Oral HistoryMCLS 0058
Alta Dennison Oral HistoryMCLS 0059
Harrison Dental Oral HistoryMCLS 0060
Alphonse & Doris DeSloover Oral HistoryMCLS 0061
Frank DeSloover Oral HistoryMCLS 0062
Frank A. DeSloover Oral HistoryMCLS 0063
Angelo Diaz Oral HistoryMCLS 0064
Curtis Dise Oral HistoryMCLS 0065
Alice Donnelly Oral HistoryMCLS 0066
Donald Doty Oral HistoryMCLS 0067
Elton Dubke Oral HistoryMCLS 0068
Elton Dubke Oral HistoryMCLS 0068
Marie Duvall Oral HistoryMCLS 0069
Doris Eber Oral HistoryMCLS 0070
Emerson Ebersole Oral HistoryMCLS 0071
Clarence A. Ehrhardt Oral HistoryMCLS 0072
Leonard Ellison Oral HistoryMCLS 0073
Millie Elmer Oral HistoryMCLS 0074
Harry Emerick Oral HistoryMCLS 0075
Kyle Evans Oral HistoryMCLS 0076
Madeline Fetzer Oral HistoryMCLS 0077
Howard Fix Oral HistoryMCLS 0078
Alva Folk Oral HistoryMCLS 0079
Lucille Folk Oral HistoryMCLS 0080
Lucille Forrest Oral HistoryMCLS 0081
M. Florence Foshag Oral HistoryMCLS 0082
Samuel J. Fox Oral HistoryMCLS 0083
Elmer W. Frank Oral HistoryMCLS 0084
Irma French Oral HistoryMCLS 0085
Irma French Oral HistoryMCLS 0085
Harold Frey Oral HistoryMCLS 0086
Beulah Fuhrmann Oral HistoryMCLS 0087
Clark Gallagher Oral HistoryMCLS 0088
Paul Garty Oral HistoryMCLS 0089
Ethel Gawronski Oral HistoryMCLS 0090
Murlin Gaynier Oral HistoryMCLS 0091
Carl & Cordelia Geiman Oral HistoryMCLS 0092
Charles & Dorothy Gere Oral HistoryMCLS 0093
Herman Gertz Oral HistoryMCLS 0094
John Giarmo Oral HistoryMCLS 0095
Bernard Gillenkirk Oral HistoryMCLS 0096
Catherine Gillespie Oral HistoryMCLS 0097
Edward Gligoroff Oral HistoryMCLS 0098
Oliver Golden Oral HistoryMCLS 0099
Mrs. Golden Oral HistoryMCLS 0100
Lucy Gonyea Oral HistoryMCLS 0101
John & Bertha Goodin Oral HistoryMCLS 0102
John Gotha Oral HistoryMCLS 0103
Mary Graves Oral HistoryMCLS 0104
Dorothy Sr. Griffing Oral HistoryMCLS 0105
Eileen Grodi Oral HistoryMCLS 0106
Elsie Gutmann Oral HistoryMCLS 0107
Christina Sr. Haffendorf Oral HistoryMCLS 0108
Kenneth Harbaugh Oral HistoryMCLS 0109
Bernice Harpst Oral HistoryMCLS 0110
Otis Harris Oral HistoryMCLS 0111
PEG HARRIS Oral HistoryMCLS 0112
Albert Hassenzahl Oral HistoryMCLS 0113
Gwendolyn Hatcher Oral HistoryMCLS 0114
Jeanette Mrs. Hatter Oral HistoryMCLS 0115
Frank Heck Oral HistoryMCLS 0116
Wilbur & Lydia Heck Oral HistoryMCLS 0117
Anne Heckel Oral HistoryMCLS 0118
Anne Heckel Oral HistoryMCLS 0118
Leola Heiss Oral HistoryMCLS 0119
George Henrich Oral HistoryMCLS 0120
Mrs. Hiser Oral HistoryMCLS 0121
Milton Hoffman Oral HistoryMCLS 0122
Jennie Holcomb Oral HistoryMCLS 0123
Loretta Homrich Oral HistoryMCLS 0124
Richard Hurley Oral HistoryMCLS 0125
George & Evelyn Imo Oral HistoryMCLS 0126
Edna Jacobs Oral HistoryMCLS 0127
Robert Jeffrey Oral HistoryMCLS 0128
Helen Jones Oral HistoryMCLS 0129
Fanny Judson Oral HistoryMCLS 0130
Josef Julian Oral HistoryMCLS 0131
Alberta Kahlbaum Oral HistoryMCLS 0132
Warden Kahle Oral HistoryMCLS 0133
Herman & Hulda Kaper Oral HistoryMCLS 0134
Rosemary Kennedy Oral HistoryMCLS 0135
Rosemary Kennedy Oral HistoryMCLS 0135
Clara Kliendienst Oral HistoryMCLS 0136
Florence Knaggs Oral HistoryMCLS 0137
Lloyd Knapp Oral HistoryMCLS 0138
Mrs. Kocsis Oral HistoryMCLS 0139
Carl & Lucille Koppelman Oral HistoryMCLS 0140
Mary Korte Oral HistoryMCLS 0141
Charles Kreps Oral HistoryMCLS 0142
George & Selma Krueger Oral HistoryMCLS 0143
Selma Krueger Oral HistoryMCLS 0144
Jeanette Kull Oral HistoryMCLS 0145
George Kundrat Oral HistoryMCLS 0146
Gus & Mary La Roy Oral HistoryMCLS 0147
Cletus Laginess Oral HistoryMCLS 0148
Gerald Lammers Oral HistoryMCLS 0149
Langton Oral HistoryMCLS 0150
Lynette Latondress Oral HistoryMCLS 0151
Edna Leyshock Oral HistoryMCLS 0152
Mary Licina Oral HistoryMCLS 0153
Charles Liedel Oral HistoryMCLS 0154
Joseph Liparoto Oral HistoryMCLS 0155
Joseph & Lena Liparoto Oral HistoryMCLS 0156
Lena Liparoto Oral HistoryMCLS 0157
Elsie Little Oral HistoryMCLS 0158
Evan Little Oral HistoryMCLS 0159
Eva Lockmiller Oral HistoryMCLS 0160
Joseph Loughney Oral HistoryMCLS 0161
James Lowe Oral HistoryMCLS 0162
Phillip Lynch Oral HistoryMCLS 0163
Harold Maloney Oral HistoryMCLS 0164
Marie Manausso Oral HistoryMCLS 0165
Warren Marshall Oral HistoryMCLS 0166
Marie Masserant Oral HistoryMCLS 0167
Dora & Carolyn Mathis Oral HistoryMCLS 0168
Dora & Carolyn Mathis Oral HistoryMCLS 0168
Elizabeth McWebb Oral HistoryMCLS 0169
Robert Meiring Oral HistoryMCLS 0170
Mentel Oral HistoryMCLS 0171
Lando Mentel Oral HistoryMCLS 0172
Rena & Anna Metdepenningen Oral HistoryMCLS 0173
William Metz Oral HistoryMCLS 0174
Clara Meyer Oral HistoryMCLS 0175
Mr. & Mrs. Andrew Meyer Oral HistoryMCLS 0176
Mr. & Mrs. Clifford Meyer Oral HistoryMCLS 0177
Pearl Meyers Oral HistoryMCLS 0178
Samuel Jr. Mignano Oral HistoryMCLS 0179
Earl Miller Oral HistoryMCLS 0180
Noreen Miller Oral HistoryMCLS 0181
Walter Miller Oral HistoryMCLS 0182
Mrs. Charles Milligan Oral HistoryMCLS 0183
Ruth Minney Oral HistoryMCLS 0184
Gustave & Florence Moede Oral HistoryMCLS 0185
Gustave & Florence Moede Oral HistoryMCLS 0185
Joseph E. Mohler Oral HistoryMCLS 0186
Ruth Montri Oral HistoryMCLS 0187
George Morris Oral HistoryMCLS 0188
Mr. & Mrs. Eugene Moyer Oral HistoryMCLS 0189
Milton Munson Oral HistoryMCLS 0190
Milton & Mary Munson Oral HistoryMCLS 0191
Milton P. Munson Oral HistoryMCLS 0192
Mrs. Mary Munson Oral HistoryMCLS 0193
Pat Munson Oral HistoryMCLS 0194
Dan Muszynski Oral HistoryMCLS 0195
Alice Newcombe Oral HistoryMCLS 0196
Raymond Noble Oral HistoryMCLS 0197
Peter Noelanders Oral HistoryMCLS 0198
Edward Nolan Oral HistoryMCLS 0199
Roland Oetjens Oral HistoryMCLS 0200
Ruth & Thomas Ong Oral HistoryMCLS 0201
Marino Pace Oral HistoryMCLS 0202
Jack Parker Oral HistoryMCLS 0203
Malvin Parks Oral HistoryMCLS 0204
Ortha Parmelee Oral HistoryMCLS 0205
Earl Parriet Oral HistoryMCLS 0206
Vincinzina Patania Oral HistoryMCLS 0207
Anna Pilette Oral HistoryMCLS 0208
Nicholas Pillarelli Oral HistoryMCLS 0209
Stephen Pipis Oral HistoryMCLS 0210
Wayne Plattner Oral HistoryMCLS 0211
Dale Porter Oral HistoryMCLS 0212
B. J. Poupard Oral HistoryMCLS 0213
Edmund Poupard Oral HistoryMCLS 0214
Marvin J. Poupard Oral HistoryMCLS 0215
Kenneth Pyles Oral HistoryMCLS 0216
Marie Rassel Oral HistoryMCLS 0217
Richard A. Rathke Oral HistoryMCLS 0218
Richard A. Rathke Oral HistoryMCLS 0218
Roseanne Rauch Oral HistoryMCLS 0219
Robert Raymo Oral HistoryMCLS 0220
Clarence Reaume Oral HistoryMCLS 0221
James Reifer Oral HistoryMCLS 0222
Reinhardt Oral HistoryMCLS 0223
Merl Rigel Oral HistoryMCLS 0224
Geraldine Robinson Oral HistoryMCLS 0225
Richard & Donna Rodziewicz Oral HistoryMCLS 0226
Eric Rogers Oral HistoryMCLS 0227
Pasquale & Frances Rossi Oral HistoryMCLS 0228
Stanley Rozycki Oral HistoryMCLS 0229
Maude Rye Oral HistoryMCLS 0230
Ernest & Marie Salisbury Oral HistoryMCLS 0231
Tolbert Hacker Sandlin Oral HistoryMCLS 0232
Hilda Savage Oral HistoryMCLS 0233
Russell Schafer Oral HistoryMCLS 0234
Charles C. Schankin Oral HistoryMCLS 0235
Charles C. Schankin Oral HistoryMCLS 0235
Hilda Trabbic Schaub Oral HistoryMCLS 0236
Viola Alice Scheuerman Oral HistoryMCLS 0237
Fred Schmidt Oral HistoryMCLS 0238
Ruth Schmidt Oral HistoryMCLS 0239
Dale Schroeder Oral HistoryMCLS 0240
Howard J Schuler Oral HistoryMCLS 0241
Howard J. Schuler Oral HistoryMCLS 0242
Howard John Schuler Oral HistoryMCLS 0243
Otto & Eda Schultz Oral HistoryMCLS 0244
Clarence Schwartz Oral HistoryMCLS 0245
Rita Seals Oral HistoryMCLS 0246
Elva Sefcik Oral HistoryMCLS 0247
O. Ruth Seitz Oral HistoryMCLS 0248
Alta Shey Oral HistoryMCLS 0249
Harold Shock Oral HistoryMCLS 0250
E. J. Shoemaker Oral HistoryMCLS 0251
Beatrice Sisung Oral HistoryMCLS 0252
Gerry Sjue Oral HistoryMCLS 0253
May Smith Oral HistoryMCLS 0254
Nita Smith Oral HistoryMCLS 0255
R. Harry Smith Oral HistoryMCLS 0256
Merland Sontag Oral HistoryMCLS 0257
August Sordini Oral HistoryMCLS 0258
Irene Southworth Oral HistoryMCLS 0259
Dominic Spinale Oral HistoryMCLS 0260
Mary Stasa Oral HistoryMCLS 0261
Staub Oral HistoryMCLS 0262
Margaret Stiffler Oral HistoryMCLS 0263
Iris Stocking Oral HistoryMCLS 0264
John Phillip Stoner Oral HistoryMCLS 0265
Luella Stoner Oral HistoryMCLS 0266
Phillip Stoner Oral HistoryMCLS 0267
Harold Stotz Oral HistoryMCLS 0268
Harold Stotz Oral HistoryMCLS 0268
Hugo Stotz Oral HistoryMCLS 0269
Helen Stoyanovich Oral HistoryMCLS 0270
Elmer Straits Oral HistoryMCLS 0271
Robert Strimpel Oral HistoryMCLS 0272
Leland & Marriet Sweet Oral HistoryMCLS 0273
Louis Switney Oral HistoryMCLS 0274
Beatrice Tremble Oral HistoryMCLS 0275
Augusta Trpelka Oral HistoryMCLS 0276
John & Viola Ucci Oral HistoryMCLS 0277
Madeline Vitale Oral HistoryMCLS 0278
Peter Vuich Oral HistoryMCLS 0279
Esther Waddell Oral HistoryMCLS 0280
Walbridge Oral HistoryMCLS 0281
Florence Weber Oral HistoryMCLS 0282
Vera Welch Oral HistoryMCLS 0283
Grace Dr. Wertenberger Oral HistoryMCLS 0284
Leo & Suzanne Wickenheiser Oral HistoryMCLS 0285
Leo & Suzanne Wickenheiser Oral HistoryMCLS 0285
Harold & Julia Willets Oral HistoryMCLS 0286
Clessie Wilson Oral HistoryMCLS 0287
Helen Winter Oral HistoryMCLS 0288
Norman Woelmer Oral HistoryMCLS 0289
Earl Wright Oral HistoryMCLS 0290
Dawson Yerkes Oral HistoryMCLS 0291
Marion Yoas Oral HistoryMCLS 0292
Frances Young Oral HistoryMCLS 0293
Anne Zast Oral HistoryMCLS 0294
Richard H. Austin Oral HistoryDiscussion of his career as businessman, public office and terms as Michigan's Secretary of State.DPL 0001
Albert J. Dunmore Oral HistoryInterviews life & career, newspaper man and Chrysler Corp. Exe.DPL 0002
Ulysses W. Boykin Oral HistoryBiographical interview; ownership of Detroit Tribune; WGPR-TV & Radio involvement; Nat. Black Republican Council.DPL 0003
Nellie Huger Ebersole Oral HistoryInterview: involvment w/Art Center Music SchoolDPL 0004
Telitha Cumi Bowens Oral HistoryTranscript of interview: career as artisit & educationDPL 0005
Lillian Hatcher Oral HistoryInterview: life and career as UAW worker and admin.DPL 0006
Elizabeth Kohn Dunn Oral HistoryDear Oral History ProjectDPL 0007
Anne Davidow Seeger Oral HistoryDear Oral History ProjectDPL 0008
Walter Gibbs Oral HistoryDear Oral History ProjectDPL 0009
Steven Spoils Oral HistoryDear Oral History ProjectDPL 0010
James T. Jenkins Oral HistoryTranscript concerning founding and early history of Graystone International Jazz MuseumDPL 0011
Minnie McGhee Oral HistoryInterview concerning her family's integrating an all-white neighborhood in Detroit in the 1940's and the legal precedent associated with their caseDPL 0012
Helen Malloy Oral HistoryBiographical interview: including discussion of involvement with the Detroit Housewives League and the National Housewives LeagueDPL 0013
Leroy Mitchell Jr. Oral HistoryTranscript concerning life, career, war experience, Detroit in the 1940's and teaching experiences in GhaunaDPL 0014
Gladys Pelham Roscoe Oral HistoryInterview concerning life, African-Americans in Detroit, and genelogy of Pelham family.DPL 0015
Anne Dora Roberson Russell Oral HistoryTranscript: concerning her early life, education and teaching career in Dale, Montgomery, and Coffee counties Alabama.DPL 0016
Willis Eugene Smith Oral HistoryInterview concerning life and career as a mortician and Detroit funeral director.DPL 0017
Marcena Taylor Oral HistoryBiographical oral history interview, including discussion of career as Detroit firefighter. He was the first African-American to be promoted to barralion chief in the Detroit Fire Department.DPL 0018
James Thompson Oral HistoryTranscript of oral history interview concerning life and experiences as a solider in WWII and author. His book True Colors documents his experience as a Korean P.O.W. held of 1004 days.DPL 0019
Hilda Vest Oral HistoryTranscript of oral history interview concerning her work as Broadside Press owner and editor.DPL 0020
Roscoe Worten Oral HistoryOral history interview concerning genelogy of the DeBaptiste family.WPR 0521
Albert J. Dunmore Oral History (DUPLICATE)Interviews life & career, newspaper man and Chrysler Corp. Exe.DPL 0002
Conversations with Anna Diggs TaylorTranscript of interviews with federal Judge Anna Diggs Taylor, United States District Court for the Eastern District of Michigan. Discusses: personal background; education; civil rights movement (1960s); Detroit politics; Coleman A. Young; judging; Detroit Boat Club; Vincent Chin; Fruehauf; race and jury selection; University of Michigan and affirmative action.MIED 0014
Conversations with Paul J. KomivesTranscript of interviews with federal Magistrate Judge Paul J. Komives, United States District Court for the Eastern District of Michigan. Discusses: personal background; education; United States Department of Justice; Solicitor General; racketeering; organized crime; moonshine; Appalachians; one man grand jury; gambling; Gotham Hotel; Federal Magistrates Act; Bail Reform Act; September 11, 2001.MIED 0100
Conversations with Julian Abele Cook, Jr.Transcript of interviews with federal Judge Julian Abele Cook, Jr., United States District Court for the Eastern District of Michigan. Discusses: personal background; education; segregation; Edward Bennett Williams; Harold Bledsoe; Oakland County; busing; Michigan Civil Rights Commission; judicial elections; John DeLorean; judging; Federal Sentencing Guidelines; juries, service and racial composition; crash, Northwest Airlines Flight 255; magistrate judges; cameras in the courtroom.MIED 0010
Conversations with Stewart A. NewblattTranscript of interviews with federal Judge Stewart A. Newblatt, United States District Court for the Eastern District of Michigan. Discusses: personal background; education; Army Criminal Investigation Division; Phillipines; labor law; House Unamerican Activities Committee; Flint, MI; John Swainson; Spencer v. Flint Memorial Park; Republic of New Africa; Genessee County; Alex Dandy; General Motors; redistricting; Marsh v. Flint Board of Education; prison overcrowding; Barcume v. City of Flint; tax protestors; Paday Quinn; Professional Associates; tax shelters; Harry Mohney; sentencing guidelines; jury service; mandala; alternative dispute resolution; Herbert Milliken.MIED 0013
Conversations with Anthony BertoniTranscript of interviews with United States Marshal Anthony Bertoni, United States District Court for the Eastern District of Michigan. Discusses: personal background; education; construction industry; Detroit Police Department; Big Four; Tactical Mobile Unit; Kercheval; Detroit Riot (1967); STRESS (Stop the Robberies and Enjoy Safe Streets); Olsonite Corporation; witness protection program.MIED 0200
Conversations with James P. ChurchillTranscript of interviews with federal Judge James P. Churchill, United States District Court for the Eastern District of Michigan. Discusses: personal background; education; Wolverine Boys State; Senator Robert P. Griffin; GI Bill; 40th Judicial Circuit; Lapeer County; Tuscola County; Imlay City, MI; Vassar, MI; judicial elections; Peter Lazarus; U.S. v. Real Estate One; Judicial Conference of the United States; Federal Judges Association; Detroit Fire Department; discrimination; affirmative action; Theordore Sachs; Anthony C. Diminnie; Robert E. Ozer; United States Strike Force, Organized Crime; General Motors; Ku Klux Klan; Giacalone Brothers; James M. Canham; Beauregard Steuberfield; Dr. Leo Donaldson; Tennessee Board of Probation and Parole; tax protestors; Gladys Beaver; Lewis Gordon; Wurtsmith Air Force Base; Dow Chemical Company; Saraband.MIED 0008
Conversations with Robert E. DeMascioTranscript of interviews with federal Judge Robert E. DeMascio, United States District Court for the Eastern District of Michigan. Discusses: personal background; education; Coraoplis, PA; GI Bill; Phillipines; Wayne State University; United States Attorney's Office; Sen. Homer Ferguson; Detroit Recorder's Court; Detroit Riot, 1967; Alvin Davenport; Donald Leonard; public defender; Myzell Sowell; Geraldine Ford; Martin Hayden; cross-district busing; Chester Campbell; United States v. Bowers and Beckham; Bradley v. Milliken; public litigation; sentencing guidelines; Judicial Conference of the United States, Bankruptcy Committee; bankruptcy courts; Detroit Public Schools; United States v. City of Birmingham; Baldwin House; housing discrimination.MIED 0005
Conversations with George BrodyTranscript of interviews with federal Judge George Brody, United States Bankruptcy Court for the Eastern District of Michigan. Discusses: personal background; education; Works Progress Administration; federal prison system; anti-semitism; University of Toledo; Office of Price Stabilization; sports; coaching; Theodore Levin; Wade McCree; Marion Pollard; insanity pleas; bankruptcy court, history; Boblo; Fred Sanders, Inc.; Bankruptcy Act of 1898; Bankruptcy Act of 1978; United States Trustees; Baptist Homes; Adat Shalom; attorney fees; Irving August.MIED 0150
Conversations with Judge Horace W. GilmoreTranscript of interviews with federal Judge Horace W. Gilmore, United States District Court for the Eastern District of Michigan. Discusses: personal background; education; Circleville, OH; journalism; Office of Price Stabilization; Democratic Party; Michigan Democrat (newspaper); Mennen "Soapy" Williams; Hicks Griffiths; Martha Griffiths; Neil Staebler; Blair Moody; United States Attorney's Office; State Board of Tax Appeals; Michigan Attorney General; Wayne County Circuit Court; judicial elections; Wade McCree; Republic of New Africa; Judicial Tenure Commission; Detroit Recorder's Court; jury selection; Detroit Public Schools; psychosurgery; child support payments; sentencing guidelines; writing; teaching; United States Census Bureau; Ferndale Public Schools; busing; bankruptcy court; Detroit Fire Department; Evan Callahan; Frank Battisti; Detroit Police Officers Association; affirmative action; civil rights movement; legal education; National Judicial College; National Center for State Courts; Institute for Court Management; Federal Judicial Center.MIED 0015
Conversations with Judge R. James HarveyTranscript of interviews with federal Judge R. James Harvey, United States District Court for the Eastern District of Michigan. Discusses: personal background; education; Upper Peninsula; Iron Mountain, MI; art; Army Air Force; GI Bill; W. Vincent Nash; Saginaw, MI; United States Congress, House of Representatives; Robert Griffin; Acorn Windows v. Reynolds Aluminum; Westwood v. Dow Corning Chemicals; McDonald v. West Branch; prison conditions; Kettlewell v. County of St. Clair; Dow Chemical Co.MIED 0007
Elizabeth White Oral HistoryDaughter of Lee A Wright. Tape 1.CRA 0007
Conversations with Judge John FeikensTranscript of interviews with federal Judge John Feikens, United States District Court for the Eastern District of Michigan. Discusses: personal background; education; dairy farming; Calvin College; Christian Reformed Church; Malcolm "Iffy the Dopester" Bingay; insurance industry; Republican Party; Dwight Eisenhower; Arthur Vandenberg, Jr.; Michigan Civil Rights Commission; Detroit Riot, 1967; Detroit Bar Association; O'Hare v. Detroit Board of Education; recess appointments; Sen. Patrick McNamara; Sen. Robert P. Griffin; Theodore Levin; automotive price fixing; Aladdin Hotel and Casino; bankruptcy court; Irving August; judicial security; judicial pay; cross-district busing; Detroit Water and Sewer litigation; judicial activism. MIED 0001
Richard Thomas Oral HistoryHead of CAA Metalsmith Department 1948-1984. Tape 2.CRA 0008
Rogers Marquis Oral HistorySon of Reverend Samuel S Marquis: Christ Church Cranbrook. Tape 4.CRA 0006
Margueritte Kimball Oral HistoryCAA student and financial secretary 1942-1968. Tape 5.CRA 0005
Roy Slade Oral HistoryDirector of CAA 1970-1977. Tapes 11-12.CRA 0001
Murray Douglas Oral HistoryBrookside School Art Teacher 1936-1950. Tape 13.CRA 0002
Peter Gilleran Oral HistoryCAA graduate 1950. Tape 14.CRA 0003
Elizabeth McLean and Shirley Sarver Oral HistoryGrandaughters of George Gough Booth.CRA 0004
George Winborne Oral HistoryGeorge and Hank Winborne. Tape 19.CRA 0011
Dominick Angelosante Oral HistoryDominick Angelosante with John Angelosante. Tape 20.CRA 0010
Marion Kirk Jones Oral HistoryDaughter of silversmith Arthur Nevill Kirk. Tape 18.CRA 0009
Adolf Rajanen Oral History InterviewTopics include farm life and relations with neighbors; Finnish organizations; the effects of World War I; life as a barber; Socialist and labor movements; a pastor at Wolf Lake; Finns and alcohol; sick care; and a wart cure.OHP 1970s Raj
Adrian Heinonen Oral History InterviewTopics include porcupines; camping in the woods; and deer hunting in Michigan's Upper Peninsula.OHP 1970s Hei
Aileen Jacobson Oral History InterviewTopics include family history; nursing school and nursing; the life of Finnish immigrants; different nationalities in schools and ethnic relations; life in Marquette, Mich.; and saunas.OHP 1970s Jac
Aily Koski Oral History InterviewTopics include reasons for leaving Finland; her father's activities with the IWW; his being blacklisted and moving to a farm in 1922; his ideology; her own schooling; the role of the school in the community; the St. Louis County school system; and the McCarthy era.OHP 1970s Kos
Al Harvey Oral History InterviewTopics include the life of a lumberjack; boxing; baseball; his father's mine accident and his own work in the mines; the 1913 strike; mine timbermen; the Depression; deer hunting; trapping; and Ernest Hemingway in the Copper Country.OHP 1970s Har
Alexander Nelson Oral History InterviewTopics include his grandparents coming from Norway; moving first to Hancock and then to Calumet, Mich.; different ethnic groups; the 1913 strike; the Italian Hall disaster; the YMCA; Fourth of July; sports; Prohibition; gambling; the board of trade in Houghton, Mich.; Finns, Italians, Mexicans, and Germans in Copper Country; his restaurant and bar business (1920s-1940s); the Depression; politics; temperance; tourism; home remedies and medical care; recreation; and churches in Calumet.OHP 1970s Nel
Alfred Pelto Oral History InterviewTopics include his father coming to Ishpeming; railroads; cabbage farming and marketing; potato marketing; the Cohodas family; logging; saunas; horses; dairy farming; cheese factory collapse; ethnic relations; and ice harvesting.OHP 1970s Pel
Allen R. Good Oral History InterviewTopics include his genealogy; background and schooling; and the use of hydraulic air compressors in mines.OHP 1970s Goo
Amanda Larson Oral History InterviewTopics include her family history; education; her work as a teacher; and teaching Finnish immigrants English.OHP 1970s Lar
Andrew Mickelson Oral History InterviewTopics include his religious beliefs and awakening and his involvement with the Apostolic Lutheran Church of America.OHP 1970s Mic
Anna Isola Oral History InterviewTopics include her birth in Calumet, Mich., and her family; teaching; problems teaching English; amusements; boardinghouses; the Tamarack co-op; Vertin Brothers department store in Calumet; home remedies; and picnics.OHP 1970s Iso
Anna Kangas Oral History InterviewTopics include her work at Suomi College as a housemother; coming to America; school in Finland; Finnish foods; ethnic conflicts; boardinghouses in Hancock; Fourth of July celebrations; crime; home remedies; midwives; diseases; and ministers.OHP 1970s Kan
Annie Broan Aldrich Oral History InterviewTopics include family history; the reasons her parents came to Copper Country; her father's work as a mine captain; celebrating Christmas and the Fourth of July; school; marriage to physician Addison Aldrich in 1907; life as an physician's wife; church life; social life; flu and typhoid epidemics; ethnic relations; a strike; temperance movement; suffrage; the WPA; Italian American community near Baltic; rationing; and killing wild game for meat.OHP 1970s Ald
Arthur J. Niemi Oral History InterviewInterview also includes Ilma Niemi. Topics include growing up in Virginia; home life; Fourth of July celebrations; memories of Eveleth and Payne, Minn.; church life; working in mines; and lumber camps and lumbering.OHP 1970s Nie
Armas K.E. Holmio Oral History InterviewTopics include Finland and the town of Rauma; famous Finnish clergy; living in the U.S. during the Depression; the Russo-Finnish War; World War II and his service as an army chaplain; teaching at Suomi College; conflicts between the Suomi Synod and the Finnish National Church; the Suomi archives; and bringing Finnish Americans together.OHP 1970s Hol
Arthur B. Erickson Oral History InterviewTopics include personal history; Pelkie and Baraga, Mich.; William Pelkie; Baraga physician Romulus S. Buckland; cabbage as the area's biggest cash crop; the produce trade; the Mineral Range Railroad; logging; lumber camps; his work as a teamster; Nestor Lumber Company; saloons; a cheese factory and creamery; and entertainment.OHP 1970s Eri
Arthur Mutkala Oral History InterviewTopics include the Depression; logging; hunting (including deer hunting) and hunting accidents; and trapping.OHP 1970s Mut
Arthur Oinas Oral History InterviewTopics include his parents' emigration from Finland; lumber camps; copper mines and mining; school in Calumet, Mich.; the 1913 strike; Western Federation of Miners; Socialists in the mines; Finnish newspapers; World War I; farm life in Oskar, Mich.; selling produce during the Depression; the Congregational church in Hancock; the WPA; a dairy producers cooperative; Fourth of July celebrations; and religious life.OHP 1970s Oin
Arvid M. Alanen Oral History InteriviewTopics include his father's leaving Finland, working at the mine in Ishpeming, family life and boarders, beginning his engineering career, and teaching at Suomi College.OHP 1970s Ala
Arvid Wiitaniemi Biography -- Family InterviewCollective biography of Arvid Wiitaniemi, 1871-1961, compiled chiefly by various family members. Topics include his birth in Finland in 1871; coming to the U.S. in 1887; his two marriages; family life; working in the sandstone quarry in Jacobsville; peddlers; and farm life.OHP 1970s Wii
Arvo "Charlie" Pyorala Oral History InterviewTopics include his father clearing land and building a home; starting a farm; working in lumber camps and mines; the 1913 strike; ethnic conflicts; religious life; keeping country roads open in the winter; a home remedy; moving to Pontiac in 1922; movement of many people downstate; the Depression; the WPA; a train robbery; a mine accident victim; cooperative movement; voting; running restaurants after World War II; and involvement in local social organizations.OHP 1970s Pyo
Barbara Williams Oral History InterviewTopics include attending school; graduating (1930) from Lawrence College in Appleton, Wis.; her work as a librarian in Calumet, first with the Calumet and Hecla library and later with the Calumet Public Library 1944-1966); the impact of World War I on the Copper Country; the Depression; copper mines and mining; ethnic groups and relations; amusements; the Calumet Theatre; Calumet and Hecla Band; the Fortnightly Club; and her work with the Episcopal Church.OHP 1970s Wil
Battista Bigando Oral History InterviewTopics include coming to the U.S. from Italy; getting a job in the mines; boardinghouses; medical care and physicians; playing with the Calumet & Hecla Band; Allouez; and the visit of Theodore Roosevelt to Copper Country.OHP 1970s Big
Russell Bergh Oral History InterviewInterview also includes Walter S. Holmlund--1908-1993 and Minnie Marsi. Interview relates chiefly to various aspects of life in Jacobsville,Michigan, a sandstone quarrying location at the mouth of the Copper Country's Portage Lake Entry.OHP 1970s Ber
Bertha M. Jacka Oral History InterviewTopics include community life in Calumet. Includes references to ethnic groups; copper mines and mining; 1913 copper miners' strike; Fourth of July; summer and winter pastimes; churches; schools; and hospitals.OHP 1970s Jack
Bill Waisanen Oral History InterviewAlso present during the interview is Matt Waisanen--1894-1976 and Arthur Waisanen--1900-1978. Topics include various aspects of life in Pelkie, Mich. Persons represented include Urho Erikainen, Evert Larson, and William Pelkie.OHP 1970s Wai 2
Charles Hohl Oral History InterviewTopics include being the oldest living alumnus of Michigan Tech; copper mines and mining; the 1913 strike; ethnic relations; medical care for miners; geological work; World War I and the mining industry; the Depression; saloons; and tourism in the future of Copper Country.OHP 1970s Pyo
Beaver Island Archaeology Oral HistoryArchaeologyBIHS 0001
Allers Oral HistoryRecorded in the Marine MuseumBIHS 0002
Isabelle Mooney Alimenti Oral HistoryLiveryBIHS 0003
George Anthony Oral HistoryBIHS 0005
Catherine Bales Oral HistoryBIHS 0006
Catherine Bales Oral HistoryBIHS 0006
Barb Beckers Oral HistoryRecorded in ShamrockBIHS 0007
Agnes Bird Oral HistoryRecorded in the Print ShopBIHS 0008
Pat Bonner Oral Historyfiddle musicBIHS 0011
Helen Pike Oral HistoryWith Bea BoyleBIHS 0012
Rogers Carlisle Oral Historymisc eventsBIHS 0013
Ray Carnes Oral HistoryRecorded in Isle HavenBIHS 0015
Sister Agnes Clare Oral HistoryRecorded in MarywoodBIHS 0016
Don Cole Oral Historystudying R Rutt's photos. Recorded in the Print Shop.BIHS 0019
Joe LaFreniere Oral Historyand Don ColeBIHS 0020
Garrett Cole Oral HistoryBIHS 0021
Grace Gillespie Cole Oral HistoryBIHS 0022
Grace Gillespie Cole Oral HistoryRecorded in her homeBIHS 0023
Lilian Cole Oral Historyfuneral. Recorded on a boat.BIHS 0024
Robert Cole Oral HistoryBIHS 0025
Duane Mooney Oral HistoryAlso interviewing with Tom ColeBIHS 0026
Helen Collar Oral HistoryRecorded at the Circle M during dinner.BIHS 0030
Hellen Collar Oral HistoryBIHS 0032
Lester Connaghan Oral HistoryBIHS 0034
Lester Tom Oral HistoryRide in Town w Lester/Mary Tom. Recorded in the museum.BIHS 0035
Lila Lee Connaghan Oral HistoryAlso interviews with Anna Mae/Georgie. Recorded at the Em Isle Hotel.BIHS 0036
Jack Coppens Oral HistoryAlso interviews with Rod. Recorded in Ann Arbor.BIHS 0037
Vera Snider Crandell Oral HistoryBIHS 0038
Clare Left Cull Oral HistoryRecorded at Clare's homeBIHS 0039
Glen Felixson Oral HistoryRecorded at the Boat ShopBIHS 0040
Doyle Fitzpatrick Oral HistoryIsland MormonsBIHS 0042
Doyle Andy Oral HistoryAlso interviews with Johnny AndyBIHS 0043
Stanley Floyd Oral Historyshowing photographsBIHS 0045
Aidan Gallagher Oral HistoryBIHS 0046
Anthony Gallagher Oral HistoryAlso interviewing with Charlie MartinBIHS 0047
Earl Gallagher Oral HistoryRecorded in Traverse CityBIHS 0048
Johnny Andy Gallagher Oral HistoryBIHS 0051
Nora "Nonie" Gallagher Oral HistoryBIHS 0052
Peter Gallagher Oral HistorySubject covering farmingBIHS 0053
Theresa Boyle Gallagher Oral HistoryRecorded at CharlevoixBIHS 0055
(Young) James Gallagher Oral HistoryYoung James GallagherBIHS 0056
Charlie Martin Oral HistoryAlso interviews with Tony GallagherBIHS 0057
Corneil Gatliff Oral HistoryBIHS 0059
Mary Tom Gatliff Oral HistoryBIHS 0060
Georgie Gatliff Oral HistoryAlso interviews with Lila Lee and Anna Mae. Recorded at the Em Isle Hotel.BIHS 0061
Jewell Gillespie Oral HistoryHeritage AwardBIHS 0064
Henry M. Gowman Oral HistoryBIHS 0065
Johnny Green Oral HistoryBIHS 0067
Phil Gregg Oral HistoryBIHS 0069
Anna Dowell Hammond Oral HistoryRecorded at the Print Shop.BIHS 0070
Henry Hill Oral HistoryFranklin LeftBIHS 0072
Frank Howard Oral HistoryBIHS 0074
Bernadine McCauley Jouzapaitis Oral HistoryRecorded at her home.BIHS 0077
Isabelle Kenwabikise Oral HistoryBIHS 0079
Henry Kraus Oral HistoryAlso interviews with Dorothy KrausBIHS 0080
Archie LaFreniere Oral HistoryBIHS 0083
Don Cole Oral HistoryAlso interviews with Joe LaFreniereBIHS 0084
Sybil Larsen Oral HistoryBIHS 0085
Franklin Left Oral HistoryBIHS 0086
Alice Lewis Oral HistoryBIHS 0087
Buffalo Malloy's granddaughters Oral HistoryBuffalo Malloy's granddaughters. Recorded at the Emerald Isle Hotel.BIHS 0088
Charlie Martin Oral HistoryBIHS 0089
Charlie Martin Oral HistoryBIHS 0089
Jimmy Swifty Martin Oral HistoryRecorded at the Marine Museum.BIHS 0090
Jude Martin Oral HistoryBIHS 0091
Tony Gallagher Oral HistoryAlso interviews with Charlie MartinBIHS 0092
Anna Mae Maxwell Oral HistoryAlso interviews with Georgie and Lila. Recorded at the Emerald Isle Hotel.BIHS 0093
Madonna McCafferty Oral HistoryBIHS 0094
Dave McCauley Oral HistoryRecorded at the Print Shop.BIHS 0095
Lawrence McDonough Oral HistoryRecorded at CharlevoixBIHS 0097
Mary Bert McDonough Oral HistoryBIHS 0105
Mary McDonough Oral Historyw/ MadonnaBIHS 0106
Lawrence McDonough Oral HistoryAlso interviews with Winnie McDonough. boiled dinner.BIHS 0107
Winnie McDonough Oral HistoryRecorded at CharlevoixBIHS 0108
Tom Cole Oral HistoryAlso interviews with Duane MooneyBIHS 0109
Mark LaF Oral HistoryDuane mooneyBIHS 0110
Fred Moore Oral HistoryTalks about Eri James MooreBIHS 0111
Marguerite Cole Mulligan Oral HistoryRecorded at St. Claire ShBIHS 0112
Frank Nackerman Oral HistoryAlso interviews with Grace NackermanBIHS 0115
Rod Nackerman Oral HistoryAlso interviews with K RicksgersBIHS 0117
Ramon Nelson Oral HistoryBIHS 0120
Joe O'Donnell Oral HistoryAlso interviews with Charlie O'DonnellBIHS 0123
Jay Oliver Oral HistoryBIHS 0124
Bea Boyle Oral HistoryAlso interviews with Helen PikeBIHS 0126
Helen Pike Oral Historyschool daysBIHS 0127
Antje Price Oral HistoryRecorded at Protar Home.BIHS 0132
Proctar Oral History100th, Collar, Pike, Gill., LangeBIHS 0133
Antje Price Oral HistoryRecorded at Protar and Museum.BIHS 0134
Katherine Ricksgers Oral HistoryAlso interviews with Rod Nack.BIHS 0135
Grace Bonner Rousseau Oral HistoryBIHS 0136
Rushin' Girls Oral HistoryRecorded at Kevin Gibson's home.BIHS 0137
Margaret Gallagher Zelley Schmit Oral HistoryBIHS 0138
Perry Smith Oral HistoryBIHS 0139
Perry Smith Oral HistoryBIHS 0139
Sondereggers Oral Historyon Beaver HotelBIHS 0140
Elizabeth Stephens Oral HistoryBIHS 0141
Louise Tennyson (Strangite) Oral HistoryBIHS 0142
Roy Gebo Williams Oral HistoryRecorded at J. Bartels' home.BIHS 0143
Conversations with Avern CohnTranscript of interviews with federal Judge Avern Cohn, United States District Court for the Eastern District of Michigan. Discusses: personal background; education; Democratic Party; Michigan Civil Rights Commission; Detroit Board of Police Commissioners; American Civil Liberties Union; Red Squad; Coleman Young; Judaism; busing; Judge Leon Jenkins; Dr. Robert Kearns; intermittent wiper blades; University of Michigan, speech code; federal death penalty; Jake Baker; ACLU v. Ohio; magistrate judges; alternative dispute resolution; jury selection.MIED 0011
Charles O. McManiman Oral History InterviewTopics include working as a blacksmith; his father's coming from Canada; clannishness among nationalities; politics in the Copper Country; Democratic clubs in Houghton County; Finnish interest in politics; Democratic Party support; effect of World War II on Copper Country; his dislike for Communism; the White Pine strike of 1959 and the mining strike of 1968-1969; his feelings as to what the Copper Country needs; and the future of logging.OHP 1970s McM
Charles Wilman Oral History InterviewTopics include his family, including his parents who were born in Finland; his career as a judge; his involvement with the Ontonagon County Historical Society and the Upper Peninsula Chapter of the Michigan Archaeological Society; and Ontonagon County social life and customs.OHP 1970s Wil
Dagmar Perander Oral History InterviewTopics include farm and family life; picking berries; Christmas; cross-country skiing; forest fires; schools; and the Lutheran Church and pastors Edward M. Groop, Frans Koski, and Lauri Pikkusaari.OHP 1970s Per
Don Lehto Oral History InterviewTopics include picking blueberries; the Depression; clearing land; logging; early Pelkie, including the coop, creamery, and cheese factory; making hay; school; peddlers and beggars; ethnic relations; working in the mines; copper miners' strike (1913-1914); hunting; and trapping.1970s OHP Leh
Don Tahtinen Oral History InterviewTopics include selling vegetables; Alfred Pelto; potato harvesting; soil; frosts; fertilization; giving away vegetables; gardening as a youth; and storing vegetables.1970s OHP Tah
Dr. A.J. Janis Oral History InterviewTopics include his work as a physician in Hancock, childbirth, midwives, early medical techniques, Finnish Americans and their foods, labor-management relations, and working conditions in the mines.1970s OHP Jan
Dr. Clarence Andrews Oral History InterviewInterview on Andrews's research and publication on the 1913 Italian Hall disaster in Calumet, Mich. Includes background information on the 1913-1914 copper miners' strike. Interviewed recorded on radio station WMPL in Hancock, Mich.1970s OHP And
E. Olaf Rankinen Oral History InterviewNative of Michigan's Upper Peninsula; graduate of Suomi College and Theological Seminary; military chaplain; Lutheran pastor in North Dakota, Massachusetts, Ohio, Pennsylvania, and Michigan; pilot; and archivist emeritus at Finlandia University. Topics include his family; growing up on the Upper Peninsula; the Depression; ethnic relations; attending Suomi College and Theological Seminary; and his love of flying.1970s OHP Ran
Edith A. Koivisto Oral History InterviewEdith (Laine) Koivisto was born in Kuusenkoski, Finland, and immigrated to Spokane, Wash., in 1910. In 1912, she moved to Smithville, Minn., where she worked at and attended Työväen Opisto (Work People's College). In 1913 she married Arvid Koivisto; they lived in Duluth, Minn., and Quincy, Mass., before settling in Hibbing, Minn., where Arvid worked for the Hibbing Co-op and then for Central Cooperative Wholesale. In Hibbing, Edith Koivisto participated in numerous choral and theatrical groups, published articles in the Hibbing newspapers, and wrote many plays in Finnish and English as well as various histories of the Finnish Americans in the Hibbing area. Topics include the settling in Spokane, Wash.; schooling in Finland; Industrial Workers of the World; Työväen Opisto (Work People's College); cooperatives, Arvid Koivisto (1886-1964); and art work, theater activities, and playwriting.1970s OHP Koi
Edmond Raymond Oral History InterviewTopics include his family history; railroad gangs; machine shop; loggers; steam engines and whistles; the 1913 copper miners' strike; the Italian Hall disaster; work as a carpenter; his first car; and breweries.1970s OHP Ray
William Schumer Oral HistoryInterview with Mike Smith, covering Schumer's career as a business owner of the General Linen and Uniform Company in Detroit and his personal and professional involvement with the Jewish community.WPR 0763
Vincent Sombrotto Oral HistoryInterview with Mike Smith covering his personal life and career with National Association of Letter Carriers, especially his leadership, as New York City branch president, of the 1970 wildcat strike and the subsequent rank-and-file movement that elected him national president.WPR 0778
Julius Combs Oral HistoryOral history interview.WPR 0768
Horace Jefferson Oral HistoryOral history interview.WPR 0769
Suesetta Talbert McCree Oral HistoryOral history interview.WPR 0770
Felix Seldon Oral HistoryOral history interview.WPR 0771
Juanita Rosario Diggs Oral HistoryOral history interview.WPR 0772
Amelita Mandingo-Burton Oral HistoryOral history interview.WPR 0773
Jean Hurst Mitchell Oral HistoryOral history interview.WPR 0774
Glenn Wash Oral HistoryOral history interview.WPR 0775
Ted Brandt Oral HistoryThis interview with Ted Brandt describes his lifetime of union involvement. The interview recalls Brandt's early Local One union involvement working as a journeyman lithographer. Brandt’s active role in union negotiations, his positions as vice-president and International West Coast representative of the ALA are discussed as well as the issues confronting his union from 1964 to 1972.WPR 0776
Linda Bart and Judy Ellul Oral HistoryIn this interview, sisters Linda Bart and Judy Ellul discuss their careers as rod busters. Bart entered the federally funded Trade Union Leadership Council in Detroit in 1979 and accepted a position as a rod buster with the Reinforcing Iron Workers, Local 426. Ellul was recruited by her sister in the mid 1980’s. The sisters recall their first days on the job and explain the physical and mental strength it takes for a woman to work in such a physically demanding predominately male profession. Ellul discusses how the physicality of the job ultimately led to her going on disability, while Bart too left the rod busters for the less demanding electrical trade. The interview concludes with Ellul and Bart sharing their feelings on why few women are active in the union, the merger with the ironworkers, and general concerns about the impact of the economy on their profession. At the time of the interview Ellul was working toward a degree in construction management while Bart was planning to re-enter the rod busting trade.WPR 0777
Kenneth Brown Oral HistoryKen Brown, President of the Graphic Arts International Union, is the son of Arthur Brown former president of the Toronto local. This interview was done in three parts. Part I covers Brown's earliest years; his lithographic-oriented family and their desire to follow the trade, Brown’s experience during the Second World War working in a topographical unit, and his return to Toronto.Part II deals with Browns involvement in the union, disaffiliation with the AFL-CIO, and his journey to presidency.Part III explores the political turmoil during the early years of his presidency and the mergers with several unions including the Photoengravers Union.WPR 0780
Arthur Brown Oral HistoryIn this interview Arthur Brown recounts his early years as a lithographic artist for Stone Limited in Toronto Canada. Brown also recalls his election to numerous offices at the local level, and his twenty-year role as the international vice-president for the Amalgamated Lithographers.WPR 0779
Harry Conlon Oral HistoryThis interview with Harry Conlon was conducted while he was executive-vice-president of Chicago local #245 chapter of the G.A.I.U.(Graphic Arts International Union) Mr. Conlon describes his apprenticeship as a photoengraver for the Chicago-Sun-Times. Conlon was local union president of the Photoengravers Union in Chicago and played a significant role in the merger at the local and international level. The interview also gives Mr. Conlon’s views on the nature of trade union leadership, political activity, and the future role of mergers in the trade union movement.WPR 0782
Richard Clarke Oral HistoryRichard Clarke began his lithographic career in Montreal and joined the Lithographers union in 1941. By 1949 he was president of his local. In 1957 he was appointed International Representative and became vice-president in 1964. Clarke describes the organization of the Lithographers union in Canada, contrasts the centralized control of the Canadian education with the American system, and discusses the whole question of merger and relations with select unions. Clarke completes the interview with a discussion of the nationalistic trend in Canada as far as International unions are concerned.WPR 0781
Bob Alleseee Oral HistoryInterview with Mike Smith about the Detroit radio and television personality's career as "Bob Allison," host of such shows as "Ask Your Neighbor" and "Bowling for Dollars." He and his wife Maggie Allesee are also well-known Detroit philanthropists.WPR 0783
Eleanor Josaitis Oral HistoryOral history interview with Eleanor Josaitis, co-founder of Focus:HOPE. This interview covers Josaitis’s involvement with the organization from 1968-2007.WPR 0784
Eleanor Josaitis and Senator Carl Levin Oral HistoryOral history interview with Eleanor Josaitis, co-founder of Focus:HOPE, and Senator Carl Levin, U.S. Senator from Michigan.WPR 0785
John Connolly Oral HistoryThis interview was conducted with John Connolly shortly after the union he was president of, the International Brotherhood of Bookbinders, merged with the Lithographers and Photoengravers International Union to form the Graphic Arts International Union (GAIU). Mr. Connolly describes his early work experience as a bookbinder, the strike of 1921 which affected the entire printing industry, and the effect of changing technology and mergers. The latter part of the interview is devoted to a description of the development of the Bookbinders International. The interview concludes with a discussion of the events which led up to the merger in 1972.WPR 0786
Henry J. Dillon Oral HistoryHenry J. Dillon began his career in the photoengraving trade in Chicago in 1937 in a non-union trade shop. Having been fired by his shop for economic reasons, he received further employment at another non-union shop until his entrance into the Air Force during the Second World War. After the war he returned to Chicago to complete his apprenticeship for his pre-war employer which was now a union shop. Dillon became active in Local #5 of the International Photoengravers Union and in order to make a name for him, took on less desirable positions such as chapel chairman and delegate. Dillon attended a summer seminar at the famous Wisconsin School for Workers, upon his return he was appointed full-time union organizer. Dillon also talks about the kind of technological changes in the industry, jurisdictional problems, and traces the beginning of merger discussions with the Amalgamated Lithographers of America.WPR 0787
John R. Gabbard Oral HistoryJohn Gabbard joined the Photoengravers’ Union in 1954 when he was working as a mask-out artist and then as a permit man for Advertisers Engraving in Cincinnati, Ohio. In there was a four week strike at Advertisers Engraving. As a result of his involvement in that strike, Gabbard was taken in as a journeyman, became more active in union affairs, and finally ran for the executive board and won in 1963. In this interview Gabbard describes in detail the various job classifications in his industry: routing, etching, printing, stripping, and other processes.WPR 0789
Mel Galbraith Oral HistoryMel Galbraith’s introduction to the lithography trade began in the Navy in 1946 and later in 1952 training young people in a sub-tender print shop. Out of the service Galbraith served as an apprentice on a multilith press in Minneapolis, joined Local 10 of the ALA, and became shop steward in 1954. In 1960 Galbraith moved to become the full-time president of the ALA Local in Des Moines, Iowa. In 1961 he was appointed international representative to cover Midwestern areas. He discusses the role of an international representative, his experiences with conglomerate-type negotiations, stresses the pro’s and con’s of the coordinated approach to negotiating contracts and reflects on the changing patterns of negotiations within the printing industry. Galbraith offers his thoughts on the merger with the Photoengravers Union, the merger with the Bookbinders, and he offers an opinion on merger in the future with other unions.WPR 0790
Martin Grayson Oral HistoryThis interview was conducted in two parts. Part I explores how Martin Grayson was introduced to unionism by his father, a member of the Amalgamated Clothing Workers. Grayson joined the Amalgamated Lithographers of America, Local One in 1936 as a pressman, and in 1938-39 represented the Lithographers local as a delegate. Grayson discusses the rapid expansion of the graphic arts industry during the war years, and the leadership of the ALA in gaining security and well-being for its people. Grayson reflects on the influence of the younger members of Local One, his election to Secretary-Treasurer of the International in 1948, and what it was like to step right from the bench into the second highest office in the International. In part II Grayson traces the history of the Lithographers Union and the philosophy of its leadership since the 1880’s. He describes his own rise in New York Local One and the general political relationship with other unions in New York City. Grayson gives the details of his responsibilities as International Secretary-Treasurer and discusses the dominant personality of Edward Swayduck, president of the New York Local One. Grayson traces the circumstances of his move from the position of secretary-treasurer to the vice-presidency of the Mountain Region in 1952 and how he dealt with the issues in this new location. Grayson finishes up by explaining the reasons for his resignation from his union position in 1957 and for subsequently going to work for Printing Developments, Inc. At the time of this interview Grayson was vice-president of Color-graphics, Inc.WPR 0791
Bill Hall Oral HistoryWilliam (Bill) Hall left school after the eighth grade and in 1925 became an apprentice to the photoengraving trade in a non-union shop. Having become a journeyman in 1930, Hall became active in efforts to organize Chicago Local 5 of the International Photoengravers Union. Hall describes some of the issues that led other workers to gain interest in joining the local, job discrimination and security being of major concern. After his participation in the successful organizing campaign of non-union shops in Chicago, Hall became involved in the union political picture. He was elected as a delegate to the 1946 convention and served on his local’s executive board until 1949 when he began his movement onto the International stage.WPR 0792
Earl Kinney Oral HistoryIn this interview T. Earl Kinney recalls how he obtained his first job as a delivery boy in the printing division of the Sun Publishing Company in Vancouver, British Columbia. Kinney describes how he became a letter press apprentice, a member of the ALA Local 44, and his 1945 election as vice-president of this local. Kinney tells of the withdrawal of Local 44 from the AFL –affiliated Trades and Labor Congress and the struggle for financial survival. In 1952 Kinney was elected president of Local 44; in 1962 he was elected an International Councilor of his union. Kinney discusses the councilor’s election system, the workings of the International Council Board, and the Technological Development Committee.WPR 0793
Max Levine Oral HistoryMax Levine grew up in South Philadelphia and started working in the printing trade at age seventeen, this led to an apprenticeship and membership in the Bookbinders Union in 1951. In this interview Levine discusses organizing the Curtis Publishing Company, the eventual dissolution of the company, and why Philadelphia is no longer the printing center that it used to be. Levine recalls his role as shop steward for his union, his involvement as a delegate to the Allied Printing Trades Council, and his election to president of his local. Levine also discusses the main issues confronting the Bookbinders in the fifties and sixties and the relative non-union climate in Philadelphia.WPR 0794
Edward Vincent Donahue Oral HistoryIn this interview Edward Donahue describes his childhood in South Dakota and leaving in 1939 to join the Army Air Corps where he studied photography. Donahue recalls his experience in WWII and working in the freight service after the war. Donahue enrolled at the Dunwoody Industrial Institute and this education led to his career in the engraving trade. Ed also discusses his involvement in politics and how this led to the elected positions he held in the ALA.WPR 0788
Eugene Macellari Oral HistoryEugene Macellari moved to Boise, Idaho in 1950 and took his apprenticeship as a lithographer there. Macellari went to work in a mixed shop where just the litho department was ALA under Portland Local 36. Macellari describes the strike in 1957, which lasted for three months and was broken resulting in Macellari losing his job and relocating to Seattle. In Seattle he found employment as a stripper of North Pacific Bank Note Company and worked hard to establish an ALA Local , and became president of the local in 1961. Macellari’s story then turns to how he came to learn about negotiations, unions, and labor-management relations especially under the guidance of International Representative James O’ Neill. Macellari discusses the internal politics of the ALA, the origins of the movement toward merger, and talks about areas of International concern.WPR 0795
Theodore Meyers Oral HistoryThis interview takes place in two parts.In Part I of the interview Theodore Meyers recall s joining the ALA at age nineteen as a feeder, his time in the Navy in the Second World War, and his return to work as a feeder and how he became active in the union. Meyers discusses his roles as financial secretary, recording secretary, and serving as president of the Local 24-L, Pittsburg from 1951- the time of the interview. He recalls his own efforts as president of his local to get his own local’s approval of the Inter Local Pension Fund and the unique way he finally succeeded. Part II covers the intricacies of the power struggle among individual union personalities, the mergers with the Photoengravers Union and the Bookbinders Union and the problems it posed for his own Pittsburg local and for New York Local One, and the whole issue of merging the pension funds of the two Internationals. Meyers concludes the interview discussing his relationship with the Teamsters and the United Farm Workers.WPR 0796
Gus Petrakis Oral HistoryIn this interview Gus Petrakis recalls quitting college to go to work for Western Printing during the depression. Petrakis worked his way up to apprentice pressman, became affiliated with the Milwaukee local of the ALA, and became the first recording secretary. In 1944 Petrakis became president of his local and in 1947 took on the job of International Representative of the ALA. Petrakis recalls his involvement with the 1951 strike at the Michigan Lithographic Company and his views on the International presidency controversy. He became vice-president and reviews the nature of his work closely in the Racine-Chicago area with the newly-merged Photoengravers. At the time of the interview Petrakis had been retired for two years and is able to reflect on the kind of personal experience and his involvement in the labor movement has been.WPR 0797
Eva Caradonna Oral HistoryEva Cardonna grew up Detroit and worked as a medical technician in a Doctors office for 20 years. Cardonna was looking for a change and after completing a carpentry class enrolled at the Ferndale Carpenters Local apprenticeship school. Cardonna describes her first day on the job and how she learned to adjust to an all-male work environment. After completing her apprenticeship Cardonna was recruited to work for Cadillac Motor Cars in 1983 as a result of an EEOC settlement. She was the first outside skilled tradeswomen and was able to find work for other female skilled tradeswomen. Soon she was offered a promotion as a supervisor and continued in that position. The interview concludes with a discussion on the change in the Union over the last 20 years regarding minorities and equality, and the relationship between UAW and IBEW.WPR 0855
William Schroeder Oral HistoryBorn in 1918 in Chicago and beginning his career in lithography as a dot etcher, William A. Schroeder became a member of Local 4 of the ALA in 1942. Schroeder describes the local union during the period of the forties and fifties and describes the craft of dot etching. In 1960 Schroeder turned to organizing in the Chicago area and describes the nature of his work in that respect. In 1964 Schroeder was asked to make a study of web offset presses and to evaluate their possible impact on his industry. In 1966 he took over the job of Education Director. Finally Schroeder became vice president of the union and chairman of the Education Committee and describes his experience setting up a cooperative program between the Union, the companies, and the government to study the effects of the environment in occupational situations.WPR 0799
Harry Spohnholtz Oral HistoryThis interview takes place in two parts. In part I Harry Spohnholtz recalls his interest in printing and working at printing shops in Chicago in the 1920’s. Spohnholtz joined the ALA in 1929 and during the hard years of the depression, he changed jobs often and became exposed to many areas of his trade. He finally ended up in a non-union plant and was on the committee that negotiated the first written contract between his local union and the Chicago Lithographers Association. In part II Spohnholtz describes the development of Chicago as a center of the printing trade and the importance of the school in Chicago as a training center. He describes the emergence of Chicago as a political power in the International, his work and involvement with internal union politics especially the withdrawal of the ALA from the ALF-CIO in 1958.WPR 0800
Don Stone Oral HistoryThis interview takes place in three parts. Part I discusses Stone’s early years in Wisconsin, attending the University of Wisconsin, and working as a stripper in a Lithography shop. In 1940 Stone became recording secretary of his local union in the ALA and in 1946 ran and won the election for editor of The Lithographers ‘Journal.He moved to New York City and recalls the social issues he dealt with as editor of the journal and the political strength he gained in that position. In part II Stone traces the background of the issue of the union label and jurisdiction which led to the withdrawal of the ALA from the AFL-CIO in 1958. He discusses internal union politics during the fifties and recalls the Poughkeepsie strike in 1954. Stone then begins to trace the move toward graphic arts unity, and he gives his opinion President Ken Brown’s decision to re-affiliate with the AFL-CIO. In part III Stone goes into more detail about the disaffiliation from the AFL-CIO in 1958 and then moves to the subject of efforts that have been made over the years with respect to merger, federation, or amalgamation. Stone discusses the internal union politics that culminated in the withdrawal from the International of Local One, New York. The interview is finished with stone describing the circumstances that led to moving the International headquarters from New York to Washington in 1971 and reflects on the nature of Ken Brown’s presidency.WPR 0801
Dan Streeter Oral HistoryDan Streeter started in the engraving business in 1930 and joined Chicago Local 5 of the Photoengravers Union in 1936. He gives the reasons for the organization of his own particular shop and describes the organizing campaign that took place under Larry Gruber. Streeter recalls being fired from his Chicago job and moving to Michigan and finally to Los Angeles where he became president of Los Angeles Local 32P in 1946. Streeter undertakes to trace the merger between the Photoengravers and the ALA back to its beginnings in 1962. Streeter reflects on his fifty years in the labor movement, the future of the labor movement and of his own union, and the nature of his job as financial secretary of the Graphic Arts International Union.WPR 0802
Roy Turner Oral HistoryRoy Turner was born in Toronto, Canada, in 1917 and began his career in lithography during the depression years. The Second World War and his active service in the Air Force interrupted his career temporarily. In 1956 Turner was elected full-time vice-president of his Toronto local with responsibilities mostly in the area of organizing. He describes the relationships between the ALA and the other graphic arts locals in Toronto at the time and the discussions of merger that took place. Turner was elected president of the Toronto local in 1959 and went on to the International Council in 1961. He discusses the Photoengraver-Lithographer merger, the prospects for merger with the Printing Pressman, and the current tendency on the part of some Canadian unions to disaffiliate from their United States international ties.WPR 0803
Edward Volz Oral HistoryEdward Volz, President of the Photoengravers’ Union from 1929-1954, was born in Cincinnati, Ohio. He was apprenticed to a wood engraver at the age of fifteen and joined the Photoengravers Union at twenty-one when it was still part of the Typographical Union. In this interview he discusses how he became active in union “booster trips” and reminisces about various union officers. Volz talks about the various job classifications in his industry an how he helped get them under one minimum wage scale. He describes the 1922 lockout for a return to the 48-hour week, the movement for a general printing trades union and how he helped obtain the five-day week for his industry in 1929. Volz also recalls his experience as secretary on law of the AFL under the chairman of Dan Tobin and as a fraternal delegate to represent the AFL at the British Trade unions’ Congress in 1948.WPR 0804
Jack Wallace Oral HistoryJack Wallace entered the lithographic industry after the Second World War as a litho artist, cameraman, and finally superintendent of a plant in Kansas City, Missouri. He describes the lithographic industry as it thrived in Kansas City; he describes the relationship between the lithographic industry and Hallmark Cards, one of its largest customers, and discusses the good relationship that Kansas City locals had with employers. Wallace tells about the 1951 strike in Kansas City, the roles played by individual participants, and how his involvement with the strategy of the Kansas City strike led to his appointment as International Representative in the Mountain Region. Wallace relates other union experiences including the merger between the Lithographers and the Photoengravers and the Kansas City local’s disaffiliation from the AFL in 1948 and its subsequent joining with the CIO.WPR 0805
Leon Wickersham Oral HistoryLeon Wickersham began his career in Lithography working for the DuPont Company in Wilmington, Delaware. In 1948 he moved to Racine, Wisconsin, to work for Western Publishing Company as a stripper in the lithography department. His first experience in the ALA was as a representative of the strippers on the local union executive board. From the position of strippers’ representative he was elected president of his local and found himself immediately on strike. The strike eventually led to Wickersham’s appointment as International representative in 1956. Wickersham discusses union politics as they developed in the late fifties and tells how he was appointed as President Ken Brown’s personal assistant in 1959, a post he still holds today. Wickersham related how General Counsel Ben Robinson had to step down in1962 and discusses the relationship of the general counsel to the union. Wickersham discusses the merger between the Photoengravers and the Lithographers in 1964, and relates how opposition to the merger led the New York Local One to leave the organization. Wickersham closes the interview by reflecting on the problem of sex discrimination, the GAUI, and the future of his industry and his union.WPR 0806
Milt Williams Oral HistoryThis interview takes place in two parts. In part I Williams discusses how he came from a family that believed deeply in the labor movement, losing his job in the lithographic trade on numerous occasions for organizing activity, and how he began his union career as a sentinel and became president of the Philadelphia Local 14, ALA, in 1957. Williams offers his thoughts on why the printing industry in Philadelphia has dissipated over the years. He traces his own experience and involvement with the International beginning in 1955. Since Williams has represented the Atlantic Region on the International Executive Board. He talks about the split with the AFL-CIO and recalls his own union’s milestone achievements through collective bargaining. In part II Williams talks about the internal union politics anBd personalities of the ALA. Williams assesses the role of the councilor in the International organization and the influence he exerts on policy and decisions. He goes on to deal with the whole question of automation, from the lithography perspective and the graphic arts industry as a whole. Williams also reflects on the threat to the smaller unions who do not negotiate national contracts, and offers on jurisdictional questions.WPR 0807
Joe Buckley Oral HistoryAs of January 2006, Joe Buckley was the regional director of SEIU based in Boston. He advised SEIU District 925 founders on organizing union locals at this affiliate's founding. During that time, he worked for the Alliance, charged with organizing 30,000 Massachusetts State workers.WPR 0811
Ben Robinson Oral HistoryBen Robinson Grew up in Springfield MA, and arrived in New York City in the summer of 1929 immediately after graduating from the Yale Law School. He found employment with Manfred W. Ehrich, counsel to the United States Printing and Lithographic Company. Robinson spent time working in Buffalo and soon was asked to become counsel to the Lithographic Code Authority. With the dissolution of the National Recovery Administration Robinson was out of a job and after spending a year abroad, eventually gained a position as counsel for the International Council and the Local One. Robinson recalls various cases he won including the Foote-Davies case. Robinson discusses the movement of the AF of L into the CIO and the merger and comments on the question of the relationship with the AFL-CIO over the years. He briefly recalls his involvement writing for the National Lithographer trade magazine and his relationship with the magazines owner. Robinson closes the interview by discussing the possibility of Local One returning to the union and his feelings on the issue.WPR 0798
Ray Abernathy and Denise Mitchell Oral HistoryAs of November 2005, Ray Abernathy served as president of Abernathy Associates and performed strategic campaign communications work for the AFL-CIO. At that time, Denise Mitchell served as Director of Public Affairs for the AFL-CIO. Together, they did public relations work for District 925 spanning back to the early 1980s.WPR 0808
Heather Tobis Booth Oral HistoryAs of May 2006, Heather Tobis Booth served as an activist in the civil rights and women's movements. She founded the Midwest Academy and consults for progressive organizations and citizen's action groups. In this capacity she developed theories for organizing women and came to know District 925 from this work and work she did with Citizen Action.WPR 0809
Ellen Bravo Oral HistoryEllen Bravo founded the Milwaukee chapter of 9to5 and later became co-director of 9to5—the National Association of Working Women. As of September 2006, she was a writer and taught women's studies at the University of Wisconsin. Worked as a clerical worker in healthcare, in welfare rights, as a paralegalWPR 0810
Anna Burger Oral HistoryAs of November 2005, Anna Burger served as secretary-treasurer of the the Service Employees International Union and chair of the Change to Win Federation. With SEIU she began with the Pennsylvania Social Services Union and worked her way up within that local, eventually becoming is president. She also worked under the leadership of John Sweeney when he served as SEIU's president.WPR 0812
Ellen Cassedy Oral HistoryEllen Cassedy, a founder of 9to5 and District 925, was in 9to5 until 1985. After leaving 9 to 5, she worked as a speech writer for the EPA and for SEIU officials, wrote a book with Ellen Bravo on sexual harassment and was a columnist for the Philadelphia Daily News. As of November 2005, she was completing a book about how Lithuania is engaging with its Holocaust past. After completing college, she worked at Harvard as a clerical worker and organized other women clerical workers.WPR 0813
Ellen Cassedy; Karen Nussbaum; Debbie Schneider Oral HistoryEllen Cassedy, Karen Nussbaum and Debbie Schneider were all principals in SEIU District 925 with the former two founders of 9 to 5, National Association of Working Women. They all sought to organize women office workers with the view of improving their working conditions.WPR 0814
Gloria Steinem Oral HistoryGloria Steinem, a founder of Ms. Magazine and the National Women's Political Caucus, is a journalist and social activist. She is one of the best known feminist leaders of the 1970's and 1980's.WPR 0816
Jane Fonda Oral HistoryJane Fonda, actress and anti-war activist, produced and acted in the movie “9 to 5.” She is founder, with Robin Morgan and Gloria Steinem, of the Women’s Media Center, a non-profit progressive women’s media organization.WPR 0817
Tom Hayden Oral HistoryTom Hayden, an activist for nearly five decades, is a writer and former state senator in California. He is involved in national progressive politics.WPR 0818
Geri Palast Oral HistoryGeri Palast was legislative director of SEIU, and then Assistant Secretary of Labor during the Clinton administration. She is executive director of the campaign for Fiscal Equality.WPR 0819
Bonnie Ladin Oral HistoryBonnie Ladin was one of the three original organizers of District 925 and later became the National Organizing Director of SEIU’S office workers division. She teaches in the National Labor College in Maryland.WPR 0815
Vicki Saporta Oral HistoryVicki Saporta was an organizing director for the Teamsters, and is president of the National Abortion Federation.WPR 0820
Anne Conway Oral HistoryAnne Conway was a president of a chapter of the Cuyahoga Country Public Library Chapter of District 925 in Ohio. She is a library branch manager.WPR 0821
Anne Hill Oral HistoryAnne Hill was one of the original organizers of District 925, and ultimately Executive Director of District 925. She was SEIU Ohio State Council Director, and is now Northwest Ohio Regional Director for Governor Ted Strickland.WPR 0822
Jacqueline Harris Oral HistoryJacqueline Harris was a clerical worker at Cuyahoga Community College in Ohio, and a field representative for District 925. She is retired.WPR 0823
Ed Dailey Oral HistoryEd Dailey grew up in Youngstown, OH during the depression. After working in a series of odd jobs Dailey found steady work with the Street Department of the city of Youngstown in 1934. Dailey formed an unofficial group with the other truck drivers and after the group gained some recognition they formed a civil service employees association and began organizing with other city departments. Dailey recalls that as the group grew in numbers he was referred to Mike Leiden, president of the Central Labor Council and president of the Ohio Federation of Labor, for guidance with the expansion. Dailey and Leiden got in contact with the AF of L and soon the Youngstown group voted to become part of the AFSCME. Dailey became president of the newly formed Local 288 and soon became fulltime staff at the AFSCME. This interview covers Dailey’s involvement up to the early 1960’s.WPR 0876
Joe Collins Oral HistoryJoe Collins was born into a pro-union family in Brooklyn, NY. Collins briefly worked for the Edison Company before taking a civil servant job with the city of New York. Collins became chairman of the Civil Service Organization and was actively involved in the 1937 formation of the Civil Service Technical Guild. Collins left the guild and organized the Brooklyn Borough President’s Office as part of the ACEU-American Civic Employee’s Union, which became part of the Utility Workers Union. He discusses the ACEU’s opposition to the Communist dominated UPW and the eventual dismantling of the UPW. In 1951Collins helped organize the new chartered group into Amalgamated Local 37 and by 1954 Collins became chairman of the New York City Joint Board of the Government and Civic Employees. In 1956 the GCEOC merged with the AFSCME and Collins became a vice president.WPR 0875
Tom Hoffman Oral HistoryTom Hoffman was an organizer for District 925 in Ohio. He is programs and communications director of SEIU Local 3, a Justice for Janitors local.WPR 0824
Carolyn Schweir Oral HistoryCarolyn Schweir was active in the organizing campaign at the University of Cincinnati. She is president of the union chapter at the university.WPR 0825
Carol Sims Oral HistoryCarol Sims was an employee at Cuyahoga Community College in Ohio. She started working for District 925 in 1984, and is a field representative in SEIU 1199.WPR 0826
Cinthia Sledz Oral HistoryCinthia Sledz, librarian at Cuyahoga County Public Library, was a District 925 chapter president. She is now a member of the Board of the Ohio Public Employees Retirement System.WPR 0827
Peggy Torzewski Oral HistoryPeggy Torzewski was an active member during the organizing of her library in Euclid, OHIO, and then was president of the chapter. She came on District 925 staff as a field representative, and is now an Administrative Organizer for SEIU District 1199.WPR 0828
Helen Williams Oral HistoryHelen Williams organized Cleveland Women Working which became part of 9 to 5, the National Association of Working Women.WPR 0829
Andrea Gundersen Oral HistoryAndrea Gundersen was the lead organizer and regional director for District 925 in Chicago and Illinois starting in 1981. She now works as a massage therapist with veterans and other trauma survivors.WPR 0830
Sue Chase Oral HistorySue Chase was a clerical worker and union steward at Quincy City Hospital (Quincy, MA) when District 925 was elected to represent the employees. She is now a field representative for SEIU Local 888.WPR 0831
Doreen LevasseurDoreen Levasseur was one of the first organizers hired by 9 to 5, and was president of Local 925 in the Boston area. She is now a field representative for the Massachusetts Teachers’ Association.WPR 0832
Cheryl Schaffer Oral HistoryCheryl Schaffer was one of the three original organizers of District 925, and later served as Secretary-Treasurer and Executive Director of the union. She works as executive director for a center at Boston College.WPR 0833
Janet Selcer Oral HistoryJanet Selcer joined Karen Nussbaum and Ellen Cassedy to launch 9 to 5 in Boston. She is director of the Brookline (MA) School-Community Partnership.WPR 0834
Evelyn Thorpe Oral HistoryEvelyn Thorpe is a secretary in the Boston Public Schools and served on the national executive board of District 925.WPR 0835
Maria DeLise Oral HistoryMaria DeLise was active in District 925 at the University of New Haven in West Haven, CT, and served on its national executive board. She retired after 43 years on the clerical staff at the university.The first part of the interview was accidently erased. The earlier part of the interview covered how the union got started at the University of New Haven.WPR 0836
Cindy Cole Oral HistoryCindy Cole is office manager of Local 925 in Seattle. She is active as the union representative.WPR 0837
Kim Cook Oral HistoryKim Cook was an activist in Seattle working Women and an organizer with District 925. She is president of SEIU Local 925, the union local that kept the name/number “925” after all District 925 chapters were restructured into SEIU locals in 2001.WPR 0838
Neal Culver Oral HistoryNeal Culver was a chapter vice-president, then president of District 925 at the University of Washington. He works at the University in information technology.WPR 0839
Rene DeVine Oral HistoryRenee Devine was a steward and vice president of the higher education chapter of District 925, then local president briefly. She is a manager of the cardiac lab at the University of Washington Medical School.WPR 0840
Dely Gasataya Oral HistoryDely Gasataya is chapter representative to the SEIU national executive board. She works in the University of Washington Medical Center billing department.WPR 0841
Pam MacEwan Oral HistoryPam MacEwan was an organizer for District 925 in the initial campaign at the University of Washington. She is now an executive vice president for the Group Health Cooperative in Seattle.WPR 0842
Linda Roberts Oral HistoryLinda Roberts was a steward, treasurer, and board member of District 925. She became a professional staff member at the University of Washington.WPR 0843
Gilda Turner Oral History InterviewGilda Turner was an active member of District 925 at the University of Cincinnati Hospital before joining the union staff as an organizer. She works for Local 925 in Seattle.WPR 0844
Deborah Young Oral HistoryDeborah Young was a chapter president of District 925 at the University of Washington. She is now a managed care program coordinator at the university.WPR 0845
Robert Welsh and Jonathan Hiatt Oral HistoryJonathan Hiatt is General Counsel to the AFL-CIO, and Director of the Legal Department. Robert Welsh is Executive Assistant to AFL-CIO President John Sweeney. This interview discusses their involvement with SEIU 925.WPR 0846
Valarie Long Oral HistoryValarie Long was an organizer for District 925 in Ohio. She is now vice president of SEIU Local 32bj and a vice president on the Board of SEIU.WPR 0848
Judith McCullogh Oral HistoryJudith McCullogh joined the staff of 9 to 5 in 1975 and continued with District 925. She is operations manager for organizing at SEIU international headquarters.WPR 0847
Karen Nussbaum Oral HistoryKaren Nussbaum is Executive Director of Working America, AFL-CIO. She was a founder and president of both 9 to 5 and District 925 until she was appointed to head the Women’s Bureau of the Department of Labor in 1993. She has worked at the AFL-CIO since 1996.WPR 0849
Jackie Ruff Oral HistoryJacqueline Ruff was a founder then organizer with Local 925, and a director of District 925 until 1988. She has worked as an attorney in both the public and private sectors.WPR 0853
Debbie Schneider Oral HistoryDebbie Schneider was an active member and organizer with 9 to 5 in Boston and New York, and was an organizer for District 925 in Chicago and Cincinnati until she became president of District 925 in 1993. She is director of global organizing partnerships at SEIU.WPR 0850
Andy Stern Oral HistoryAndrew Stern has been president of the Service Employees International Union(SEIU)since 1996.WPR 0851
Barbara Rahke Oral HistoryBarbara Rahke became one of the early organizers of 9 to 5-National Association of Working Women while working at Boston University in the 1970’s. After the winning the union contract at BU Rahke went on to work for the UAW-United Auto Workers organizing at Cornell. Rahke concludes the interview by discussing the impact of District 925 on the labor movement.WPR 0854
John Sweeney Oral HistoryJohn Sweeney is president of the American Federal of Labor-Congress of Industrial Organizations (AFL-CIO). As president of SEIU in the 1980’s he expanded 925 from a local in Boston to District 925, a union with a national jurisdiction.WPR 0852
Chris Hartmire and Cesar Chavez Oral HistoryThe transcript of this oral history begins with the interview already in progress. In the first part of this interview Hartmire discusses the outline of shared qualities between himself and Chavez. Chavez joins the interview and they share their perceptions of the migrant ministry and relationship with it. They discuss the roles that different religious groups played in the boycotts and reflect on the influence of Ghandi on fasting and non-violent protests. This interview includes an outline of shared qualities of leadership between Chavez and Hartmire.WPR 0877
Elaine Crawford Oral HistoryElaine Crawford was the first women hired at the Ford Motor Co. Rouge engine plant since the Korean War. She was encouraged by a coworker to take the skilled trades test and after scoring very high decided to become an electrician until the oil crisis of 1973. After the setback with the skilled trades Crawford took a job with the City of Detroit at the Waste Water plant and soon was able to fill a vacancy as an electrical repair woman. Crawford recalls what it was like to be one of two women working on a job and the adjustment it took to work in such an environment. Crawford became active in the IBEW Local 58 as an officer and committee member. She discusses her experience as a woman in Local 58, as an officer, and the locals’ attitude toward women. She concludes the interview by considering the future of women in trade unions.WPR 0856
Cathy Dawson Oral HistoryCathy Dawson was born in Highland Park MI attended Michigan State University for three years before dropping out for financial reasons. After Dawson returned to the area she worked at Detroit Edison as a clerk for a few years but wanted a union job she that she could have more control over. Dawson apprenticed at Edison as a metal fabricator but realized that the physical demand was too much and found a new apprenticeship in the Edison machine shop. She discusses how she was (and remains) the only female worker there and explains the adjustment period that she and her male co-workers went through. Dawson explains that the apprenticeship program at Edison is no longer in existence and the problems this will cause the next generation of machinists. Dawson is currently Women's director of the local she describes that position. She concludes the interview by discussing the future of women at UWUA Local 223.WPR 0857
S.E. Oral HistoryS.E., a journeyperson pipefitter with Consumers Energy and member of UWUA- Utility Workers Union of America grew up in Detroit and graduated from Marygrove College. S.E. started working for Consumers as a part-time dispatcher and then worked as a meter reader for 4.5 years. S. E. describes her training and recalls that as a woman she was not given the full amount of training that the men received. S.E. discusses the shortage of pipefitters and how this had led to their schooling being cut short. S. E. became a union rep in 1990. She attended the Latino Workers Leadership Institute and has since volunteered at a variety of conferences, has become involved in committees, and organized for the union on the national level. S.E. concludes the interview with a discussion of her current union involvement, why so few women are in the trades, and the changes in working conditions in her trade.WPR 0858
Ann Francis Oral HistoryAnn Francis, a member of UAW Local 652, was a pipefitter, recruiter and instructor for the UAW-GM apprentice program at Oldsmobile plant in Lansing until her retirement. Francis joined the Peace Corps after college and taught English in Malaysia. After her service ended she taught in Tennessee then earned a Masters and took a teaching job outside of Lansing, MI. Francis taught in alternative education program where she was introduced to the skilled trades. She became interested in vocational education and realized that in order to teach the trades she needed to become a tradeswomen. She left her teaching position to work on the line at Oldsmobile and became an apprentice pipefitter in 1979. After working as a pipefitter for a few years Francis took a newly created position at the plant which required both a journeyman’s card and a college degree. After two years Francis began to work in a joint program with GM/UAW recruiting women and minorities. Francis retired in1998 and at same time started interviewing for her oral history “Journeys of the Uninvited: a Feminist Oral History of Tradeswomen in the Auto Industry”. Francis completes the interview with discussion of her oral history experience and her feelings on the role of affirmative action in the trades.WPR 0859
M.G. Oral HistoryM.G. is a member of Local 659 and is an Electrician at Flint Engine South. M.G began working at GM and after spending several years on the production line she began to seek a more demanding position. She tested for the skilled trades and was accepted into the apprenticeship program in 1977, the second female and the first to complete the apprenticeship. M.G discusses the difference in treatment she received from the varying generations in the plant; the younger were much more accepting of a woman in the trades than were the older generation. In 1999 she was accepted into a position in the facilities group at the new engine facility, and few years later was moved into a quality network processing position. M.G. discusses her union activities and is involved with the Coalition of Labor Union Women, Region 1C Women's Council, and the United Way. A letter from the interviewee to Margaret Roucher is included at the end of this oral history.WPR 0860
Denise Greer Oral HistoryDenise Greer of Local 898 is a millwright at the Ford Rawsonville plant. Greer attended college for music but found fulltime work with Ford in 1998. She describes the problems she has had with supervisors and harassment as she is only one of five women millwrights. Greer feels that she cannot rise politically in the union but would stay on in the plant if she could and cites the “Old Boys Club” mentality as one cause of her lack of political mobility. She discusses the lack of racial diversity in the trades and feels that there is very little encouragement to recruit women into the trades at Ford. At the time of the interview Greer was enrolled as a pre-law student at Eastern Michigan University and hopes to have a future in labor law.WPR 0861
Carrie Harding Oral HistoryCarrie Harding of Saginaw, MI is an Operating Engineer with Local 3241 and an instructor of MIOSHA, hazardous waste removal, and mine safety courses. While working as a traffic flagger she had an opportunity to train as an equipment operator. Harding explains that she was the only woman in the training program and describes the training and equipment. She recalls the sexist treatment she received by a foreman and compares that to the mentoring and friendships she had with her co-workers. Harding discusses how she stayed with her first company for nine years, worked for other companies and eventually became certified as a HAZMAT instructor, an OSHA outreach instructor and how she got a part-time job teaching at the local. At the time of the interview the Michigan Civil Rights Initiative was on the November ballot, Harding recalls the role it played in her entering the field and the possible ramifications if the initiative is ended. Harding closes the interview with a discussion of her feelings on why there are no women officers in her local, why there have never been and if there will be any in the future. An afterward by Harding is included at the end of this oral history.WPR 0862
Renee Holbrook Oral HistoryRenee Holbrook is a mechanic with the National Conference of Firemen and Oilers Local 1219 under SEIU. Holbrook was born raised in Owosso, MI and attended technical school at Universal Technical Institute in Illinois and completed a certificate program in mechanics. After she completed the technical school program Holbrook moved to southern Illinois and took as job as a mechanic at a truck stop. The birth of her second nephew brought Holbrook back to Owosso in search of employment. An aunt who was employed at the Ann Arbor Railroad encouraged Holbrook to submit an application and soon she took a temp job doing miscellaneous work, she eventually progressed to mechanical work on the locomotives. That Fall Holbrook was hired as a full time employee in the union shop of the railroad, she was the first female employee to work outside of the office for the railroad. Holbrook describes the railroad shop, the different levels of job classification, the role of the mechanics, and the work on the engine itself. At the time of the interview Holbrook was active in her union. She recalls how she became the union secretary- treasurer and describes her duties in that office and union meetings. Holbrook was informed the week prior to her oral history interview that the railroad was being sold; at the recording she still had no news on the state of her job.WPR 0863
S.H. Oral HistoryIn this interview S.H., a sheet metal worker with Local 80 recalls growing up in Taylor, MI and attending college in Kentucky and Lawrence Technical University before having to drop out for financial reasons. A sheet metal worker friend encouraged S.H. to take a placement test at Local 80; she passed and was offered a position. S.H. describes apprentice school, the sheet metal trade, and recalls that she was only the fourth female in her trade. She describes the transition from working in the shop to gaining hands on experience in the field where she first worked with local 80 members. This led to her interest in union activities. After experiencing and witnessing the unfair treatment of women in her field, S.H. ran and was elected an executive board member with the determination to make a change. S.H. describes the duties and functions of the executive board and its members. S.H. closes with her thoughts on the future of the trades, and how the economic conditions will affect the future of women in the trades.WPR 0864
Sue Jantschak Oral HistorySue Jantschak is a business agent with the Michigan Regional Council of Carpenters and Millwrights. After graduating from Michigan State University with a degree in veterinary technology and working in that field for thirteen years Sue developed allergies to the animals and had to leave the profession. Jantschak worked briefly in a bank but soon applied for the Carpenters apprenticeship after learning of the program. Jantschak recalls the difficulties she had during her apprenticeship and the general bias against women in the trades. Sue explains how she started attending union meetings to see where her dues were going and discusses the volunteer work she has done with the union. Jantschak completes the interview by discussing how and why she transitioned into a business agent, mentions that she was the first female business agent in Michigan and in the Carpenters, describes the job process and the danger the job poses.WPR 0865
T.M. Oral HistoryT.M., a non-union roofer and general contractor, was born and raised in Trenton, MI. T.M. got into the construction trade at age 18 after buying a house, realizing she could not afford to hire help she learned how to do the repair work herself. At the same time she became involved in drag racing and raced cars with her husband in the professional circuit for twelve years. T.M. returned to Michigan after her divorce and worked for her brothers roofing company until she remarried and started a company of her own. T.M. explains some of the roofing work she has done, the roofing process and the various materials involved. She discusses being a licensed business owner and what it entails to get a license. T.M. stresses that her position as the boss and business owner were important factors in her being treated as an equal as compared to most women in the trades. At the time of the interview T.M. had just begun teaching in the building trades program at Lincoln Park High School and hopes to continue teacher in the program.WPR 0866
Pat Nuznov Oral HistoryPat Nuznov is an electrician with IBEW-International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers Local 58 Detroit. In 1978, thanks to President Carter and affirmative action, Nuznov applied for and was accepted into IBEW Local 58’s apprenticeship program. Nuznov recalls her apprentice schooling and the sexist treatment she and the other female apprentices had to tolerate from their teacher. She describes her experiences in the field, the working conditions, and the lack of accommodation on the job site for women. Nuznov was appointed steward and explains that duties that position entails. She discusses the difficulties she has had in becoming active with her union and explains the problems she and other tradeswomen have had forming the Detroit tradeswomen group. Nuznov discusses why she feels there are so few women in the trades, why they are not being recruited, and why so few female union members are active in their unions. Nuznov closes the interview with her thoughts on the role of affirmative action in the trades and her hopes for the futureWPR 0867
Terri Patterson Oral HistoryTerri Patterson is a structural ironworker with Ironworkers Local 25 and a third generation Native American ironworker. In this interview Terri describes the apprentice program and the classes. Many of her male relatives are in the field and she describes some of her experiences working with them. Patterson emphasizes that feminism and women’s rights never played a role or affected her desire to work in the iron field and that her relatives in the trade, her tomboy nature, and appearance probably factored into her success. Patterson questions her future in the profession as she is not sure how much longer she wants to work in the field because of the physical abuse the work inflicts on her body. Patterson mentions her activity in the union and closes the interview with her hopes for the future including plans to run for sergeant at arms, get involved as a mentor to female apprentices, and to form a support group for women ironworkers.WPR 0868
Jola Stone Oral HistoryJola Stone attended art school and worked in the engineering and drafting departments of Consumers Power in Grand Rapids, MI before a friend referred her to an opening at MichCon (now DTE). Stone was the first women hired into the drafting department. Stone discusses the technical aspects of drafting and compares the way drafting was done by hand when she entered the field in 1975 to the current practice of drafting on computers. A year into her employment the drafting department joined the International Chemical Workers Union (currently under the United Food and Commercial Workers) and Jola became active in the union. Stone was vice president of her union until 1987 when she became president. She is the only female officer in her union and she discusses the underrepresentation of women in the union and the lack of encouragement for women to advance in the union. Stone ends the interview with a discussion on the benefits of being in a union and her hopes for more women to become involved in union activities.WPR 0869
Carrie Wells Oral HistoryIn this interview Carrie Wells, a tile setter from Detroit recalls how she entered the tile setting trade after attending college and working in a radio station. Wells explains the apprenticeship program’s mandate to accept women and minorities and the high turnover of these minorities upon completion of their training. Wells cites the multiple generations and the persistence of racism, sexism, and nepotism in the trade as factors in the high turnover. Wells sustained a herniated disc on the job and at the time of the interview was out on disability. She discusses the physical toll the tile setting profession can put on the body, the high rate of injury to tile setters, and job safety issues. Wells discusses her union, its membership policy, and her feelings of dissatisfaction about the union’s policies and politics. At the time of the interview Wells was out on disability and was using the time to complete her degree at Wayne State University, she was unsure if she would return to work after her injury has heeled.WPR 0870
J.W. Oral HistoryJ.W. is a metal model maker and a trainer with the UAW. Born and raised in Flint, MI J.W. went to work on the line at Delphi East in the mid 1970’s. She worked on the line for 10 years, took the skilled trades test and scored very high. J.W. chose to be model maker because she was afraid of the heights involved with electrical work. J.W. describes her apprenticeship and the mistreatment she had to endure not only because she was not only a woman but because she was African American. J.W. decided to get involved in the union increase the representation of women and minorities. She won the position of recording secretary and in 1997 she was appointed to International staff for the UAW, the first African American woman in the history of the UAW to come out of her region to the International staff. J.W. closes the interview with her thoughts on what the union can do to get more women into the trades, the future of the trades at GM, Chrysler and Ford, and the impact that new technology has made on the trades.WPR 0871
Sara Willis Oral HistorySara Willis is an electrician at the Chrysler Sterling Heights Assembly Plant. Willis grew up in Grand Rapids and moved to Detroit in the early 1980’s to care for her ailing grandmother. She applied for the Local 58 electrical apprenticeship at the urging of a friend and after two years was called to start the program. Willis describes the apprenticeship schooling and work experience, she did not recall any mistreatment caused by her sex or race. Willis started working at Chrysler after 8 year of working at Local 58 and she compares and contrasts her experiences with both. Willis joined the UAW Local 1700 when she started working for Chrysler and is a member of CBTU-Coalition of Black Trade Unionists, CLUW-Coalition of Labor Union Women, co-chair of Women's Council Region 1, and chair of her Women's Committee. Willis explains what her official duties and activities with the groups are. At the time of this interview Willis was working towards a Bachelors degree in Management at Cornerstone College and did not plan on retiring from Chrysler. Willis closes by discussing the changes she would like to make in the local and the trades and how to make them more inclusive for women.WPR 0872
Al Church Oral HistoryThis interview covers Al Church’s early years with the AFSCME. Church entered the service in 1942 and was discharged in 1946. He returned to Hibbing, MN and took a managerial position with a construction company until he found employment with the UPW-United Public Workers at the referral of a friend. Church discusses the UPW, its jurisdiction, and affiliation with the CIO. In 1950 the UPW was expelled from the CIO and Church eventually transitioned to work with the Government and Civic Employees Organizing Committee (GCEOC). The GCEOC merged with the AFSCME in 1956 and Church recalls the events after the merger and the formation of Council 65 which was chartered in 1959.WPR 0874
Gordon Chapman Oral HistoryThis interview is conducted in two parts. Part I discusses Chapman’s early years in Wisconsin, graduating from the University of Wisconsin in 1931 during the Depression. In 1934 a college fraternity brother asked Chapman to help him out with the Wisconsin Emergency Relief Administration, distributing surplus commodities to relief clients. Chapman recalls the origins of the AFSCME and how he became involved with the organization. He explains the missions on which the union was built and discusses his relationship with Arnold Zander, the first International president. In part II Chapman continues the discussion on the impact of WWII on the union. He recalls Zander’s interest in international affairs and how this concerned the union. The opposition to Zander and the origins of the opposition are mentioned as well as the 1964 conventions and the defeat of Zander. Chapman stepped down from his official union duties in 1966 but continued to attend conventions. He discusses his feelings on the events of the last ten years and closes with his views on Zander as a person and his feelings on collective bargaining.WPR 0873
Mr. & Mrs. Joseph Billups Oral HistoryJoseph Billups was one of the first members of Local 600. He worked at Ford and was fired numerous times for his union association. Mr. and Mrs. Billups discuss their roles with the Ford Hunger March of 1932, their participation with the Detroit Unemployment Council and Soup Kitchens, and the assistance they provided for evicted persons before the founding of the welfare department. Billups describes the Nat Turner Club, a progressive group that influenced the advancement of Civil Rights. He recalls his involvement striking various auto plants and Henry Fords’ recognition of the union. Billups recalls how he became pro-union and explains the reasons that other black auto workers did not participate in union activities.WPR 0878
Jack T. Conway Oral HistoryOral history interview with Jack Conway and Alice M. Hoffman (AFL-CIO Oral History Project)WPR 0879
Jack T. Conway Oral HistoryOral history interview with Jack Conway and Michael L. Gillette. (Lyndon B. Johnson Presidential Library)WPR 0880
Betty Lou Bailey Oral HistoryThere were few other women studying engineering at the University of Illinois when Betty Lou Bailey entered its undergraduate mechanical engineering program. When she received her degree in 1950 she was the only woman in a graduating class of 700 engineers. Following her graduation, she began what would become a long and successful career at General Electric. Bailey originally planned on focusing her engineering talents on household appliances, however she discovered that she liked turbines more than refrigerators while working as a testing engineer for GE. During her career she held positions as a testing, design, and systems engineer in GE's Large Jet Engine Department, Gas Turbine Department, and in its Valley Forge Space Technology Center, where she worked on the NASA Nimbus weather satellite project. She received a Master of Engineering from Penn State in 1967 and became a registered Professional Engineer in Ohio and New York. She holds a patent for a variable exhaust nozzle. A member of the Society of Women Engineers since 1951, Bailey has been an officer of the Philadelphia Section and served on the SWE Executive Committee. Bailey's contributions to SWE were recognized in 1985 when she was elected to the College of Fellows. She was the first woman member of the Engineering Society of Cincinnati, and eventually became the chair of its Guidance Committee. She has also served on national committees for the National Society of Professional Engineers, the Engineers Joint Council, and the American Society for Engineering Education.WPR 0881
Yvonne Brill Oral HistoryYvonne Brill's high school principal encouraged her to become a teacher, her parents remained neutral, and her physics teacher believed that, as a woman, she would not become anything at all. Nevertheless, Brill pushed to receive a Bachelor of Science in Mathematics from the University of Manitoba in 1945, and a Master of Science in Physical Chemistry in 1951 from the University of Southern California. Since then, Brill has received numerous honors and awards and is known internationally for her work on rocket and jet propulsion systems. Brill began her career as a mathematician at Douglas Aircraft Company but switched careers in 1946 when she became a research analyst on rocket propellant systems project for RAND Corporation. Since that time, Brill has held numerous positions as an engineer or manager at Marquardt Corporation, United Aircraft Corporation, Curtiss Wright, FMC Corporation, RCA Astro-Electronics, NASA, and the International Maritime Satellite Organization. Since 1991 she has been an aerospace consultant for such clients as Telespace, Ltd. in Norway and has served on the NASA Aerospace Safety Advisory Panel and numerous U.S. National Research Council Study Committees. A member of the Society of Women Engineers since 1975, Brill is a past president of the New Jersey Section, chaired numerous national committees, served as the counselor for two collegiate sections, and has served on the National Executive Committee as both Treasurer and Director of Student Affairs. She is a Fellow of SWE and the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics, and is a member of National Academy of Engineering and the International Academy of Astronautics. Among the many honors and awards Brill has received are the SWE Achievement Award, the SWE Resnik Challenger Medal, the NASA Public Service Medal, and the IEEE Judith A. Resnik Award.WPR 0882
Lois Cooper Oral HistoryThe first person in her family to graduate from high school, Lois Cooper originally went to Tougaloo College in Mississippi to study law. She discovered that she preferred working with numbers and eventually graduated in 1954 with a degree in Mathematics from Los Angeles State College. In 1953 she became the first African-American woman to work for the California Department of Transportation (CALTRAN), where she began as an engineering aide. She progressed in her career, eventually becoming a Transportation Engineer and Project Manager for major transportation projects including the I-105 Century Freeway, as well as heading the Public Information department and the newly minted Civil Rights department in the 1970s. During her time at CALTRAN, Cooper visited over 100 classrooms to promote engineering to all young people. Cooper became a student member of the Society of Women Engineers in 1978 while taking post-graduate classes at California State University in Los Angeles. She went on to serve as the counselor for that section, co-chaired the Los Angeles Section's career guidance committee, and was elected the SWE College of Fellows in 1990. The only female member when she joined in 1971, Cooper became the first woman president of the LA Council of Black Professional Engineers. She works with the Council to encourage African-Americans to pursue engineering and continues to offer math and science tutoring on the weekends. She is also a Fellow of the Institute for the Advancement of Engineering.WPR 0883
Bonnie Dunbar Oral HistoryA ceramic engineer and former NASA astronaut, Dr. Bonnie Dunbar is currently President & CEO of the Museum of Flight in Seattle, WA. Dunbar received her M.S. in ceramic engineering from the University of Washington in 1975. Upon graduation she joined Rockwell International Space Division as a Senior Research Engineer, where she worked on the original ceramic tiles of the space shuttle. In 1978, Dunbar began her 27-year career at NASA when she was hired as a flight controller at Johnson Space Flight Center. In just two short years she was made a mission specialist astronaut, where she logged 1,208 hours in orbit on five space missions aboard the shuttles Atlantis, Challenger, Columbia and Endeavour. She was a member of the first mission to dock with the Russian Mir Space Station in 1995. Early in her career as an astronaut, Dunbar also earned her Ph.D. in mechanical/biomedical engineering from the University of Houston. On her last mission in 1998, serving as Payload Commander, Dunbar was responsible for more than four tons of scientific equipment, supplies and water for delivery to Mir, as well as 23 scientific experiments aboard the shuttle. Dunbar became the Assistant Director for University Research and Affairs at Johnson Space Center in 1998. In this capacity, for the next five years, she was actively involved in the center's educational and grant programs, as well as its extensive collaborative efforts with colleges, universities and scientific and engineering organizations. Her final position with NASA was as Associate Director of Technology Integration and Risk Management at the Johnson Space Center's Space and Life Science Directorate. Dunbar's space experience and scientific accomplishments have garnered her many honors and distinctions, including SWE's Resnik Challenger Medal (1992) and 2005 Achievement Award. She is a member of several engineering, scientific and medical organizations and serves on a number of boards. She has published extensively, holds one patent, and has given countless presentations on behalf of the engineering community many to school age children and college engineering students.WPR 0884
Thelma Estrin Oral HistoryThelma Estrin originally intended to become an accountant but became interested in engineering after taking a three-month training course at Stevens Institute of Technology in 1943 and working as a machinist at the Radio Receptor Company. When her husband returned from from the Second World War they both enrolled in undergraduate programs in electrical engineering at the University of Wisconsin. By 1951 Estrin had completed her doctorate. Estrin was a pioneer in the application of engineering and computer electronics to medicine and established the first integrated electronics and computer laboratory for neuroscientists. She developed an interest in biomedical engineering in 1951 while working as a research assistant at the Electroencephalography Department at New York's Columbia Presbyterian Hospital Neurological Institute. In 1955 the Estrins settled in Los Angeles, where Thelma Estrin taught engineering courses at Valley College. She joined the the Brain Research Institute in 1960 and was named the director of its Data Processing Laboratory ten years later. Beginning in 1982 Estrin was appointed to a two-year term as the Director of Electrical, Computer and Systems Engineering at the National Science Foundation. In 1980 Estrin returned to the classroom as a professor in residence at the UCLA Computer Science Department, from from which she retired in 1991. Estrin is a Fellow of the Society of Women Engineers and received the SWE Achievement Award in 1981 for her contributions to biomedical engineering. She is a IEEE Fellow and was the first woman to serve on the IEEE Board of Directors. She also served as President of the Biomedical Engineering Society.WPR 0885
Ruth Gordon Oral HistoryRealizing that her dream of becoming a concert pianist would not materialize, Ruth Gordon instead decided to pursue a degree in civil engineering at Stanford University. She completed a master's degree in structural engineering in 1950 and has since become regarded as an icon of earthquake safety. Gordon was turned down for several jobs because of her gender but was eventually hired by Isadore Thompson to oversee the construction of a hospital in southern California. She became the first female member of the Structural Engineers Association of Northern California in 1953 and the first female state-certified structural engineer in 1959. Gordon worked for the Structural Safety Section of the California Office of the State Architect from 1959 to 1984 , primarily overseeing the construction and renovation of hospitals and schools. In 1984 she founded her own company, Pegasus Engineering, Inc., and conducted safety and earthquake survivability studies and post-earthquake evaluations on hospitals and schools. Gordon retired in 2001. Although Gordon has resigned from the Society of Women Engineers national organization twice in political protest, she remains very active with the Golden Gate Section. In addition to her numerous professional speaking engagements, she works with the Math Science Network to encourage a new generation of girls to pursue engineering. She served as the first woman president of the Bay Area Engineering Council from 1982-1983.WPR 0886
Mary McCarthy Oral HistoryMary McCarthy was a freshman studying communications technology at an Oklahoma junior college when the United States entered the Second World War. She joined the Civil Service shortly after and spent the war years repairing damaged planes and testing aviation communications equipment in San Antonio and Hawaii. After the war ended she got married, adopted a child, and did not return to school or work for another 20 years. In 1968, at the age of 45, McCarthy began the transition from “kitcheneering to engineering.” She originally enrolled in San Francisco City College so that she could help her daughter with her homework, but in 1973 McCarthy transferred to the University of California, Berkley to pursue engineering. She completed her degrees in electrical engineering and material science in 1976 and was hired by Lockheed as a reliability engineer to work on parts control and standardization. During her career at Lockheed she worked on military and aerospace projects such as the Hubble Space Telescope and became the chairperson of the Parts Control Board. She retired from Lockheed in 2005. McCarthy is a Fellow of the Society of Women Engineers. She has served as the president of the Texas and the Santa Clara Valley sections and as the national Vice President of Student Services. In addition to her professional achievements she has contributed to the success of others by giving presentations and developing career guidance programs with SWE, the American Association of University Women, the International Conference of Women Engineers and Scientists, the Girl Scouts, and 4-H.WPR 0887